shalt


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shalt

 (shălt)
aux.v. Archaic
A second person singular present tense of shall.

shalt

(ʃælt)
vb
archaic or dialect (used with the pronoun: thou or its relative equivalent) a singular form of the present tense (indicative mood) of shall

shalt

(ʃælt)

v.
Archaic. 2nd pers. sing. of shall.
References in classic literature ?
Well go thy way: thou shalt not from this grove Till I torment thee for this injury.
Thou shalt see it shining in the arm that wields a pick or drives a spike; that democratic dignity which, on all hands, radiates without end from God; Himself
Thou shalt see my back parts, my tail, he seems to say, but my face shall not be seen.
Thou shalt be rich'; and there are a good many curious things said in the New Testament about rich men that I think would make me feel rather queer if I was one of them.
As a dream when one awaketh, so, oh Lord, when thou awakest, thou shalt despise their image.
Thou shalt be a dog in my hut, and feed from my hand.
Go to him, brave Bumpo, secretly, when the sun has set; and behold, thou shalt be made the whitest prince that ever won fair lady
Thou at the sight Pleas'd, out of Heaven shalt look down and smile, While by thee rais'd I ruin all my Foes, Death last, and with his Carcass glut the Grave: Then with the multitude of my redeemd Shall enter Heaven long absent, and returne, Father, to see thy face, wherein no cloud Of anger shall remain, but peace assur'd, And reconcilement; wrauth shall be no more Thenceforth, but in thy presence Joy entire.
Thou shalt have both thanks and reward, my friend,'' said the Prior, ``if thou wilt bring us to Cedric's in safety.
At the entrance of the village, so says Cide Hamete, Don Quixote saw two boys quarrelling on the village threshing-floor one of whom said to the other, "Take it easy, Periquillo; thou shalt never see it again as long as thou livest.
On the trail that thou must tread To the thresholds of our dread, Where the Flower blossoms red; Through the nights when thou shalt lie Prisoned from our Mother-sky, Hearing us, thy loves, go by; In the dawns when thou shalt wake To the toil thou canst not break, Heartsick for the Jungle's sake: Wood and Water, Wind and Tree, Wisdom, Strength, and Courtesy, Jungle-Favour go with thee!
Thou shalt have a hundred such set phrases, and five hundred to the boot of them.