shaman


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sha·man

 (shä′mən, shā′-)
n. pl. sha·mans
A member of certain traditional societies, especially of northern Asia and of North and South America, who acts as a medium between the visible world and an invisible spirit world and who practices magic or sorcery for purposes of healing, divination, and control over natural events.

[Russian, from Evenki šaman, Buddhist monk, shaman, perhaps from Tocharian B ṣamāne, monk, from Prakrit (dialect of documents from the ancient city of Niya in the Taklimakan) ṣamana, from Sanskrit śramaṇaḥ, from śramaḥ, religious exercise, from śramati, he toils, practices austerity.]

sha·man′ic (shə-măn′ĭk) adj.

shaman

(ˈʃæmən)
n
1. (Other Non-Christian Religions) a priest of shamanism
2. (Other Non-Christian Religions) a medicine man of a similar religion, esp among certain tribes of North American Indians
[C17: from Russian shaman, from Tungusic s̆aman, from Pali samana Buddhist monk, ultimately from Sanskrit śrama religious exercise]
shamanic adj

sha•man

(ˈʃɑ mən, ˈʃeɪ-, ˈʃæm ən)

n.
(esp. among certain tribal peoples) a person who acts as intermediary between the natural and supernatural worlds, using magic to cure illness, foretell the future, control spiritual forces, etc.
[1690–1700; < German Schamane < Russian shamán, probably < Evenki šamān, samān]
sha•man•ic (ʃəˈmæn ɪk) adj.

shaman

Sometimes called a medicine man, these are people who have magic powers resulting from contact with the supernatural. Common in the religion of the Inuits, Maoris, Mongolians, Polynesians and Native Americans. In some cases, they may be female.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shaman - in societies practicing shamanism: one acting as a medium between the visible and spirit worldsshaman - in societies practicing shamanism: one acting as a medium between the visible and spirit worlds; practices sorcery for healing or divination
non-Christian priest, priest - a person who performs religious duties and ceremonies in a non-Christian religion
medicine man - a Native American shaman

shaman

noun witch doctor, medicine man, medicine woman, healer, sorcerer, spirit-raiser, voodooist the full control of a shaman
Translations
šaman
poppamiesshamaani
šaman
무당

shaman

[ˈʃæmən] Nchamán m

shaman

[ˈʃeɪmən] n (= holy man) → chaman m

shaman

[ˈʃæmən] nsciamano

shaman

n. curandero.

shaman

n chamán -mana mf, brujo -ja mf
References in classic literature ?
Then I heard the talk of the shamans and chiefs that the Russians had brought strange sicknesses upon the people, and killed our men, and stolen our women, and that the land must be made clean.
With unemployment growing, the barrier to becoming a shaman or fortune teller is lower than other areas where a degree or license is required.
Shaman Healer Heretic is a fun urban fantasy novel with a slightly different world structure.
Bentley Systems has announced that David Shaman has been promoted to the position of general counsel.
A kelonkap event is usually performed once a year and they are sponsored by a recovered patient, a shaman who wants to appease his tutelary with a gift, or someone who can afford to sponsor one for a purpose.
The Shaman and the Mafia presents one Marietta Collins, who finds herself unexpectedly immersed in two dilemmas: the murder of her close friend, and a torrid love affair.
Contract Awarded for support the Shaman shipborne maritime Communications Electronic Support Measures (CESM) system and infrastructure.
A shaman is a person regarded as having access to, and influence in, the world of benevolent and malevolent spirits, who typically enters into a trance state during a ritual, and practices divination and healing.
I plead my case; we need access to a shaman as soon as possible, even if it requires traveling a distance.
She analyzes the social processes constituting and contesting shaman's power, focusing on the contemporary Darhad shamans from the Shishget depression in the northernmost corner of Mongolia.
Their reimaginings occur among the sacred sites on Seoul's mountainous periphery and on mountainsides throughout Korea--spiritually potent rocks, springs, son'ang trees that harbor unquiet ghosts, and--for the last twenty years or so--a proliferation of commercial shaman shrines, or kuttang where shamans rent space to perform their rituals.
Morechand suggested I try a transcription in the Roman Catholic village of Huay Saek, under Father Zannoni then, with his first convert, a former shaman named Zam Nob.