shanty


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Related to shanty: Sea shanty

shan·ty 1

 (shăn′tē)
n. pl. shan·ties
A roughly built, often ramshackle building; a shack.

[Probably from Canadian French chantier, hut in a lumber camp, from French, timberyard, from Old French, gantry, from Latin canthērius, rafter, nag, from Greek kanthēlios, pack ass.]

shan·ty 2

 (shăn′tē)
n.
Variant of chantey.

shanty

(ˈʃæntɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. (Architecture) a ramshackle hut; crude dwelling
2. Austral and NZ a public house, esp an unlicensed one
3. (Forestry) (formerly, in Canada)
a. a log bunkhouse at a lumber camp
b. the camp itself
[C19: from Canadian French chantier cabin built in a lumber camp, from Old French gantier gantry]

shanty

(ˈʃæntɪ) or

shantey

;

chanty

(ˈʃæntɪ; ˈtʃæn-) or

chantey

n, pl -ties or -teys
(Music, other) a song originally sung by sailors, esp a rhythmic one forming an accompaniment to work
[C19: from French chanter to sing; see chant]

shan•ty1

(ˈʃæn ti)

n., pl. -ties.
a crudely built hut, cabin, or house.
[1810–20]

shan•ty2

(ˈʃæn ti)

n., pl. -ties.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shanty - small crude shelter used as a dwellingshanty - small crude shelter used as a dwelling
igloo, iglu - an Eskimo hut; usually built of blocks (of sod or snow) in the shape of a dome
mudhif - a reed hut in the marshlands of Iraq; rare since the marshes were drained
shelter - a structure that provides privacy and protection from danger
2.shanty - a rhythmical work song originally sung by sailors
work song - a usually rhythmical song to accompany repetitious work

shanty

noun
1. shack, shed, cabin, hut, lean-to, hovel, shiel (Scot.), bothy (Scot.), shieling (Scot.) a young population in urban slums and shanties
2. song, song, air, tune, chant, ballad, hymn, ditty one of my father's favourite sea shanties

shanty

noun
An ugly, squalid dwelling:
Translations
أُغْنِيَة بَحّارَهكوخ خَشَب
chatrčnámořnický popěvek
hytteskursømandssang
tengerészdal
kofi, hreysi
jūreivių darbo dainalūšnelė
būdajurnieku darba dziesmamājele
námornícka pieseň
derme çatma yapıgecekonduheyamola

shanty

1 [ˈʃæntɪ] N (Brit) (also sea shanty) → saloma f

shanty

2 [ˈʃæntɪ] Nchabola f, jacal m (Mex), bohío m (CAm), callampa f (Chile)

shanty

[ˈʃænti] n
(= hut) → baraque f
(= song) → chanson f de marinsshanty town shantytown [ˈʃæntitaʊn] nbidonville m

shanty

1
n (= hut)Baracke f, → Hütte f

shanty

2
n (Mus) → Seemannslied nt, → Shanty nt

shanty

1 [ˈʃæntɪ] n (also sea shanty) → canzone f marinaresca

shanty

2 [ˈʃæntɪ] nbaracca

shanty

(ˈʃӕnti) plural ˈshanties noun
1. a roughly-built hut or shack.
2. (also sea shanty) a song that sailors used to sing while working.
References in classic literature ?
You know the saloon is one of them patent houses you can take to pieces, and I've been reckoning you boys will have to pitch in and help me to take the whole shanty over to the laurel bushes, and put it up agin Kearney's cabin.
Once upon a time old Lafferty had been caught with a gang that had stolen cows from several of the poor people of the neighborhood and butchered them in an old shanty back of the yards and sold them.
It was pretty close to the shanty, and I thought I heard the old man coming all the time; but I got her hid; and then I out and looked around a bunch of willows, and there was the old man down the path a piece just drawing a bead on a bird with his gun.
Writers there are who say the first adventure he met with was that of Puerto Lapice; others say it was that of the windmills; but what I have ascertained on this point, and what I have found written in the annals of La Mancha, is that he was on the road all day, and towards nightfall his hack and he found themselves dead tired and hungry, when, looking all around to see if he could discover any castle or shepherd's shanty where he might refresh himself and relieve his sore wants, he perceived not far out of his road an inn, which was as welcome as a star guiding him to the portals, if not the palaces, of his redemption; and quickening his pace he reached it just as night was setting in.
I dare say the lad never slept in anything better than a bark shanty in his life, unless it was some such hut as the cabin of Leather-Stocking.
Here in this dirty shanty you will enter into love's fulfillment.
Next day we went ashore, and I put up Sir Henry and Captain Good at the little shanty I have built on the Berea, and which I call my home.
I heard a man, going up a mountain in Switzerland, once say he would give worlds for a glass of beer, and, when he came to a little shanty where they kept it, he kicked up a most fearful row because they charged him five francs for a bottle of Bass.
After looking the town over with some care, the most suitable place that could be secured seemed to be a rather dilapidated shanty near the coloured Methodist church, together with the church itself as a sort of assembly-room.
And so he did not like Zdrzhinski's tale, nor did he like Zdrzhinski himself who, with his mustaches extending over his cheeks, bent low over the face of his hearer, as was his habit, and crowded Rostov in the narrow shanty.
There was an old shanty once in the gulch," Morgan resumed when the ruin wrought by my awkwardness had been repaired, "but just previously to my visit it had been blown down, or rather blown away, for its debris was scattered all about, the very floor being parted, plank from plank.
Abelwhite was a kind man, and he would often drop into my little shanty and smoke a pipe with me, for white folk out there feel their hearts warm to each other as they never do here at home.