sharp-tailed grouse


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sharp-tailed grouse

 (shärp′tāld′)
n.
A grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) of northern North America, having a short pointed tail, mottled brown plumage, and dark V-shaped breast markings.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sharp-tailed grouse - large grouse of prairies and open forests of western North Americasharp-tailed grouse - large grouse of prairies and open forests of western North America
grouse - popular game bird having a plump body and feathered legs and feet
References in periodicals archive ?
The pair of scientists would often walk for a mile or so along the railroad tracks and discuss, among other things, I am sure, the hundreds of sharp-tailed grouse they would see and flush along the way.
Caption: These brushy draws are typical high-plains pheasant and sharp-tailed grouse habitat.
Factors influencing the survival of neonate sharp-tailed grouse Tympanuchus phasianel lus.
Using sharp-tailed grouse movement patterns to guide release-site selection.
Thorburn has held offices for the Spokane Audubon Society and Washington Ornithological Society and was the recipient of WDFW's 2010 Volunteer of the Year award for her efforts to help bring sage grouse and sharp-tailed grouse back to Lincoln County.
We believe that potential long-term benefits for species like sage-grouse and sharp-tailed grouse exist by taking sound, science-based steps to develop strategies improving habitat on reclamation and native grassland environments.
Since its creation in 1985, it has boosted populations of ducks, ring-necked pheasants, prairie chickens, Columbian sharp-tailed grouse and other wildlife by providing areas where they can feed and reproduce.
Excellent duck, goose and sharp-tailed grouse hunting on the creek and ponds or hunt Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge just a few miles away.
These pines, which can grow hundreds of feet high, make up the habitat for a large number of indigenous mammals, reptiles, and plants, plus many species of birds, including northern goshawks, sharp-tailed grouse, golden eagles and red-tail hawks.
During the springtime, sharp-tailed grouse in the colonies strut, ruffle their feathers, and inflate air sacs to impress potential mates.
The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is trading mountain quail from Douglas County to Idaho in exchange for some Columbia sharp-tailed grouse.