she-oak


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she-oak

(shē′ōk′)
n.
1. Any of various Australian trees in the genera Casuarina or Allocasuarina.
2. The wood of one of these trees.

[From she (probably originally applied in a disparaging sense, because its wood resembles true oak when finished but was sometimes considered more difficult to work).]

she-oak

n
(Plants) any of various Australian trees of the genus Casuarina. See casuarina
[C18 she (in the sense: inferior) + oak]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.she-oak - any of several Australian trees of the genus Casuarina
genus Casuarina - genus of trees and shrubs widely naturalized in southern United States and West Indies; coextensive with the family Casuarinaceae and order Casuarinales
casuarina - any of various trees and shrubs of the genus Casuarina having jointed stems and whorls of scalelike leaves; some yield heavy hardwood
References in periodicals archive ?
5 million Fighting Extinction Fund helps Zoos Victoria step up their interventions in endangered species such as the Baw Baw Frog, Alpine and She-Oak Skinks, the Grassland Earless Dragon and Spotted Tree Frog.
Dendrobium boosii was first found on the central Visayan island of Leyte, in 2011, growing on the trunks and underside of branches on she-oak (Casuarina sp.
The Alpine She-oak Skink Cyclodomorphus praealtus (Shea 1995) is confined to high altitude plateaux on the south-eastern Australian mainland in two Australian states (Victoria and New South Wales) (Koumoundouros et al.
Within Victoria, the Alpine She-oak Skink has been recorded from (north-to-south) the Bogong High Plains and Falls Creek Alpine Resort, Mt Hotham to Mt Loch and Mt Higginbotham, and on the Lankey and Omeo Plains in the broader Dargo High Plains (Schulz et al.
2A-9, 14-21 (Ulmus x 'Accolade') Beefwood, or she-oak 20-35 ft.
He claims tests in Australia using She-oak have produced remarkable results in combating female infertility.
This important fund will assist Zoos Victoria to step up their interventions in endangered species such as the Baw Baw Frog, Alpine and She-Oak Skinks, the Grassland Earless Dragon and Spotted Tree Frog.
River red gums and she-oaks have declined to extremely low numbers on the Murrumbidgee River upstream of Wagga Wagga.