sheaf


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sheaf

 (shēf)
n. pl. sheaves (shēvz)
1. A bundle of cut stalks of grain or similar plants bound with straw or twine.
2. A collection of items held or bound together: a sheaf of printouts.
3. An archer's quiver.
tr.v. sheafed, sheaf·ing, sheafs
To gather and bind into a bundle.

[Middle English sheef, from Old English scēaf.]

sheaf

(ʃiːf)
n, pl sheaves (ʃiːvz)
1. (Agriculture) a bundle of reaped but unthreshed corn tied with one or two bonds
2. a bundle of objects tied together
3. (Archery) the arrows contained in a quiver
vb
(tr) to bind or tie into a sheaf
[Old English sceaf, related to Old High German skoub sheaf, Old Norse skauf tail, Gothic skuft tuft of hair]

sheaf

(ʃif)

n., pl. sheaves.
1. one of the bundles in which cereal plants are bound after reaping.
2. any bundle, cluster, or collection: a sheaf of papers.
[before 900; Middle English shefe (n.), Old English schēaf, c. Old Saxon skōf, Old High German scoub sheaf, wisp of straw, Old Norse skauf tail of a fox]
sheaf′like`, adj.

Sheaf

 a collection of things bound together; a large bundle; a cluster of flowers; leaves. See also garb, gavel.
Examples: sheaf of arrows, 1318; of banners, 1863; of barley, 1796; of beans, 1862; of blooms, 1882; of painting brushes, 1855; of columns (of liquid), 1857; of corn, 1717; of fire, 1811; of telegraph forms, 1888; of glass (bundle of six plates), 1402; of grain; of hemp; of jets of flame; of jets of water; of letters, 1865; of librarians; of lines (geometry); of rain, 1888; of rays (light rays); of reeds, 1846; of rye; of snakes, 1631; of spears, 1805; of steel (30 pieces), 1495; of timber, 1534.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sheaf - a package of several things tied together for carrying or storingsheaf - a package of several things tied together for carrying or storing
bale - a large bundle bound for storage or transport
faggot, fagot - a bundle of sticks and branches bound together
pack - a bundle (especially one carried on the back)
parcel, package - a wrapped container
swag - a bundle containing the personal belongings of a swagman

sheaf

noun bundle, mass, pile, bunch, stack, heap, wodge (informal) He took out a sheaf of papers and leafed through them.
Translations
حُزْمَه، غُمْر
snopsvazek
negstak
kéve
knippi
pėdas
kūlissainītissaišķis
snop

sheaf

[ʃiːf] N (sheaves (pl)) (Agr) → gavilla f; [of arrows] → haz m; [of papers] → fajo m, manojo m

sheaf

[ˈʃiːf] [sheaves] (pl) ngerbe f

sheaf

n pl <sheaves> (of wheat, corn)Garbe f; (of arrows etc, papers, notes)Bündel nt

sheaf

[ʃiːf] n (sheaves (pl)) (Agr) → covone m; (of papers) → fascio

sheaf

(ʃiːf) plural sheaves (ʃiːvz) noun
a bundle usually tied or held together. a sheaf of corn/notes.
References in classic literature ?
A large sheaf, but I know there's room in your heart for it, Marmee dear," added Meg's tender voice.
Thus, a blazing spear, a sword of flame, a bow, or a sheaf of arrows seen in the midnight sky, prefigured Indian warfare.
We knocked the head out of an empty hogshead and hoisted this hogshead to the flat roof of the chapel, where we clamped it down fast, poured in gunpowder till it lay loosely an inch deep on the bottom, then we stood up rockets in the hogshead as thick as they could loosely stand, all the different breeds of rockets there are; and they made a portly and imposing sheaf, I can tell you.
Here in my hand is a sheaf of messages from every quarter of my kingdom.
His eyes he op'nd, and beheld a field, Part arable and tilth, whereon were Sheaves New reapt, the other part sheep-walks and foulds; Ith' midst an Altar as the Land-mark stood Rustic, of grassie sord; thither anon A sweatie Reaper from his Tillage brought First Fruits, the green Eare, and the yellow Sheaf, Uncull'd, as came to hand; a Shepherd next More meek came with the Firstlings of his Flock Choicest and best; then sacrificing, laid The Inwards and thir Fat, with Incense strew'd, On the cleft Wood, and all due Rites perform'd.
Instead of the solitary telephone of Cleveland-Harrison days, the White House has now a branch exchange of its own--Main 6-- with a sheaf of wires that branch out into every room as well as to the nearest central.
But he also took with him his stout yew bow and a sheaf of chosen arrows.
To tell you the truth, his three-headed mastiff would never let me pass the gateway; for I should be compelled to take a sheaf of sunbeams along with me, and those, you know, are forbidden things in Pluto's kingdom.
Accordingly, I caught up my pile of gold, stuffed it into my pocket, and, grasping my sheaf of bank-notes, moved to the table in an adjoining salon where a second game of roulette was in progress.
Bobby made no answer, but had Revere looked into the breast-pocket of his coat he might have seen there a sheaf of badly-written letters which perhaps accounted for the power that possessed the boy.
The subordinate he had summoned immediately appeared with a sheaf of papers in his hand.
From the sheaf last finished she draws a handful of ears, patting their tips with her left palm to bring them even.