shellfish


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

shell·fish

 (shĕl′fĭsh′)
n. pl. shellfish or shell·fish·es
1. Any of various edible aquatic invertebrate animals having a shell, especially mollusks such as clams and oysters, and crustaceans such as lobsters, crabs, and shrimp.
2. An edible mollusk, in contrast to a crustacean: regulations concerning fish, crustaceans, and shellfish.
3. The edible flesh of such animals.

shell′fish′ing n.

shellfish

(ˈʃɛlˌfɪʃ)
n, pl -fish or -fishes
(Animals) any aquatic invertebrate having a shell or shell-like carapace, esp such an animal used as human food. Examples are crustaceans such as crabs and lobsters and molluscs such as oysters

shell•fish

(ˈʃɛlˌfɪʃ)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) -fish, (esp. for kinds or species) -fish•es.
an aquatic animal having a shell, as the oyster or other mollusks or the lobster or other crustaceans.
[before 900]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shellfish - meat of edible aquatic invertebrate with a shell (especially a mollusk or crustacean)shellfish - meat of edible aquatic invertebrate with a shell (especially a mollusk or crustacean)
mollusc, mollusk, shellfish - invertebrate having a soft unsegmented body usually enclosed in a shell
seafood - edible fish (broadly including freshwater fish) or shellfish or roe etc
mussel - black marine bivalves usually steamed in wine
huitre, oyster - edible body of any of numerous oysters
clam - flesh of either hard-shell or soft-shell clams
cockle - common edible European bivalve
crabmeat, crab - the edible flesh of any of various crabs
crawdad, crawfish, ecrevisse, crayfish - tiny lobster-like crustaceans usually boiled briefly
limpet - mollusk with a low conical shell
lobster - flesh of a lobster
crayfish, langouste, rock lobster, spiny lobster - warm-water lobsters without claws; those from Australia and South Africa usually marketed as frozen tails; caught also in Florida and California
escallop, scollop, scallop - edible muscle of mollusks having fan-shaped shells; served broiled or poached or in salads or cream sauces
2.shellfish - invertebrate having a soft unsegmented body usually enclosed in a shellshellfish - invertebrate having a soft unsegmented body usually enclosed in a shell
carapace, cuticle, shell, shield - hard outer covering or case of certain organisms such as arthropods and turtles
invertebrate - any animal lacking a backbone or notochord; the term is not used as a scientific classification
Mollusca, phylum Mollusca - gastropods; bivalves; cephalopods; chitons
scaphopod - burrowing marine mollusk
gastropod, univalve - a class of mollusks typically having a one-piece coiled shell and flattened muscular foot with a head bearing stalked eyes
coat-of-mail shell, polyplacophore, sea cradle, chiton - primitive elongated bilaterally symmetrical marine mollusk having a mantle covered with eight calcareous plates
bivalve, lamellibranch, pelecypod - marine or freshwater mollusks having a soft body with platelike gills enclosed within two shells hinged together
cephalopod, cephalopod mollusk - marine mollusk characterized by well-developed head and eyes and sucker-bearing tentacles
shellfish - meat of edible aquatic invertebrate with a shell (especially a mollusk or crustacean)

shellfish

noun molluscs, crustacean, bivalve Fish and shellfish are the specialities.

Shellfish

clam, clappy-doo or clabby-doo (Scot.), cockle, crab, crayfish or crawfish, Dublin Bay prawn, freshwater shrimp, king prawn, langoustine, lobster, Moreton Bay bug, mussel, Norway lobster, oyster, prawn, scallop or scollop
Translations
سَمَكَه مَحاريَّه ، صَدَفَهمَحَار
korýšměkkýš
skaldyr
äyriäinen
školjke
kagylós állat
skeldÿr
조개
mäkkýš
lupinar
skaldjur
สัตว์น้ำประเภทมีเปลือก
trai sò

shellfish

[ˈʃelfɪʃ] N (shellfish (pl)) (Zool) → crustáceo m; (as food) → marisco(s) m(pl)

shellfish

[ˈʃɛlfɪʃ] [shellfish] (pl)
n (= crustacean) → crustacé m (= mollusc) → coquillage m
npl (to eat)fruits mpl de mershell game n (US)
(lit) tour de passe-passe qui se pratique avec des gobelets
(= fraud) → escroquerie f

shellfish

[ˈʃɛlˌfɪʃ] n pl inv (crab) → crostaceo; (mollusc) → mollusco (Culin) → frutti mpl di mare

shell

(ʃel) noun
1. the hard outer covering of a shellfish, egg, nut etc. an eggshell; A tortoise can pull its head and legs under its shell.
2. an outer covering or framework. After the fire, all that was left was the burned-out shell of the building.
3. a metal case filled with explosives and fired from a gun etc. A shell exploded right beside him.
verb
1. to remove from its shell or pod. You have to shell peas before eating them.
2. to fire explosive shells at. The army shelled the enemy mercilessly.
ˈshellfishplural ˈshellfish noun
any of several kinds of sea animal covered with a shell (eg oyster, crab).
come out of one's shell
to become more confident and less shy.
shell out
to pay out (money). I had to shell out twenty dollars.

shellfish

مَحَار korýš skaldyr Schalentier οστρακόδερμο crustáceo äyriäinen coquillages školjke crostaceo 조개 schelpdier skalldyr skorupiak mariscos моллюск skaldjur สัตว์น้ำประเภทมีเปลือก kabuklu deniz ürünü trai sò 贝类

shellfish

n. molusco; marisco.

shellfish

n (pl -fish o -fishes) marisco
References in classic literature ?
For food we subsisted upon shellfish and an occa-sional bird that I succeeded in knocking over with a rock, for long practice as a pitcher on prep-school and varsity nines had made me an excellent shot with a hand-thrown missile.
I was sitting some little distance away devouring shellfish, of which, by the way, I was becoming exceedingly tired.
The former was searching for a species of shellfish which was to be found in the mud close to the river bank.
The two before him, all ignorant of the near presence of that terrifying form, continued preoccupied in the search for shellfish, poking about in the mud with short sticks.
When the men returned, burdened with sacks of shellfish, Mark Hall, as high priest, commanded the due and solemn rite of the tribe.
A slimy, gobby shellfish which civilization gives men the
Peggotty, after looking at Ham, who stood smiling sheepishly over the shellfish, without making any attempt to help him, said:
I found some shellfish on the shore, and ate them raw, not daring to kindle a fire, for fear of being discovered by the natives.
Even I, who had the tide going out and in before me in the bay, and even watched for the ebbs, the better to get my shellfish -- even I (I say) if I had sat down to think, instead of raging at my fate, must have soon guessed the secret, and got free.
For two days, therefore, the poor weather-worn voyagers kept quiet, and either staid on board of their vessel, or merely crept along under the cliffs that bordered the shore; and to keep themselves alive, they dug shellfish out of the sand, and sought for any little rill of fresh water that might be running towards the sea.
Whenever it is low water, winter or summer, night or day, they must rise to pick shellfish from the rocks; and the women either dive to collect sea-eggs, or sit patiently in their canoes, and with a baited hair-line without any hook, jerk out little fish.
Not that all architectural ornament is to be neglected even in the rudest periods; but let our houses first be lined with beauty, where they come in contact with our lives, like the tenement of the shellfish, and not overlaid with it.