shellshock


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shellshock

(ˈʃɛlˌʃɒk)
n
(Psychiatry) loss of sight, memory, etc, resulting from psychological strain during prolonged engagement in warfare. Also called: combat neurosis
References in periodicals archive ?
SHELLSHOCK Staff are worried as Huck needs special lamps to survive
But he redeemed himself by providing a shellshock for groom, brother Alex Broughton at the Buckminster Church last month, near Melton Mowbray.
What happens if Verizon customers come out of shellshock and start using data on par with T-Mobile customers of today?
It will also alert banks to techniques aimed at bypassing security controls or exploitation of a security vulnerability - such as through the use of Heartbleed or Shellshock bugs or via DNS tunnelling or domain fronting - while providing them with all relevant details of software security vulnerabilities including how the vulnerability was discovered and what would be its potential impact.
Thanks to the timely intervention of friend and fellow poet Robert Graves, who successfully argued that Sassoon was mentally ill from shellshock, today called posttraumatic stress, it was decided he should instead be sent to hospital.
It also automates provisioning of workload- aware security for rapid protection of virtual machines from software vulnerabilities, including Shellshock and Heartbleed.
Our rows get so explosive it's a wonder I'm not being treated for shellshock on a twice-daily basis when, at bedtime, we do the whole thing again in reverse.
There's a World War II pensioner still recovering from shellshock to the notso-holy priest on a mission to find out exactly who desecrated his garden.
Indeed, his grandad went on to survive another big battle in Anzio, Italy, but suffered from shellshock for the rest of his life.
Security maturity should also benefit, due to some hard-taught lessons: Heartbleed and shellshock taught us that nothing is sacred, and nothing can be taken for granted; Dragonfly and Black Energy taught us that targeted attacks are not only possible but increasingly common; and the unfortunate steel mill incident has taught us that Stuxnet-class sabotage can and will happen again.
Security: Unlike organizations that fell prey to Heartbleed, man-in-the-middle (MITM), Shellshock and other recent OpenSSL-related vulnerabilities, customers using Array's purpose-built SSL solutions were not exposed and did not require remediation.