shemagh


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she·magh

 (shə-mäg′, shmäg)
n.

[Colloquial Arabic šimāġ, probably from Turkish yaşmak, yaşmağ-, yashmak; see yashmak.]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mamdouh Ali helped men put on traditional Saudi thobes, a keffiyeh, or what Ali called the shemagh, or headdress, and the igal, the black rope-like cord that holds the keffiyeh in place.
It is almost always of white cotton but many have a checkered pattern in red, stitched into them, which is most desired in Bahrain and is made of a thicker cloth called a shemagh.
Neither does he flaunt a shemagh as a head dress like his King does.
I noticed movement through the fabric of my tan shemagh, and pulled back the veil.
25 000 17 000 shemagh handkerchiefs and scarves in various colors,
Successfully showcasing the local produce of the UAE, the Emirati pavilion usually sees a rush of shoppers, cruising for traditional products such as Abayas (cloaks for women), Jellabiyas (traditional wide-cut garmets), Shemagh (square Arab headdress), Sheila (headcover for both men and women), besides other Emirati specialties like Khous baskets, made from palm fronds.
The broadcaster who read the announcement of his death wearing a dark robe and traditional shemagh head covering Abdullah Al Shihri said on Twitter it had pained him to break the news.
El unico tono que varia es el del shemagh o kufiya, la prenda que se pone entre la cabeza y el pecho que se usa en el Medio Oriente contra el clima desertico y es caracteristica de los guerrilleros palestinos.
Television pictures showed Abdullah's covered body borne on a simple litter carried by members of the royal family wearing traditional red-and-white checked shemagh headgear, following prayers.
Abdullah's shrouded body was borne on a simple litter by members of the royal family wearing traditional red-and-white checked shemagh head gear.
The shemagh is a square piece of fabric, usually around three feet on a side.
The traditional shemagh makes a great headcover, sunshade, dust mask, even a sling or tourniquet, and the troops love 'em.