sherbet


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Related to sherbet: sherbert

sher·bet

 (shûr′bĭt)
n.
1. also sher·bert (-bûrt′) A frozen dessert made mainly of fruit juice or fruit purée, usually with sugar and milk or cream.
2. Chiefly British A usually fruit-flavored effervescent powder, eaten as candy or made into a drink.
3. also sherbert Australian An alcoholic beverage, especially beer.

[Ottoman Turkish, sweet fruit drink, from Persian šarbat, from Arabic šarba, drink, from šariba, to drink; see śrb in Semitic roots.]
Word History: Although the word sherbet has been in English for several centuries, it has not always referred to what we now normally think of as sherbet. Sherbet came into English from Ottoman Turkish šerbet (Modern Turkish şerbet) and Persian šarbat, words referring to a traditional Middle Eastern beverage of sweetened, diluted fruit syrup or juice. The Turkish word is borrowed from Persian, and the Persian word comes from Arabic šarba, "drink." (The -t at the end of the Turkish and Persian words, by the way, comes from the non-pausal pronunciation of the Arabic word šarba. Before a pause or at the end of a sentence in Arabic, the feminine noun ending -t is dropped. When used within a sentence, or when a possessive suffix is added to a word, however, the final -t ending remains, as for example in šarbatī, "my drink.") The Middle Eastern drink began to be imitated in Western Europe in the 1500s, and the word sherbet is first attested in English at the very beginning of the 1600s and was probably known even earlier. In English, during the 1800s, sherbet came to be used to refer to a fizzy sweet drink made with an effervescent flavoring powder, and nowadays in British English, sherbet usually refers to a kind of candy, a fizzy flavored powder eaten by dipping a finger into a packet. Because the original Middle Eastern drink contained fruit and was often cooled with snow or shaved ice, sherbet also came to denote a kind of frozen dessert. Current American usage maintains a distinction in meaning between the words sherbet and sorbet—sherbets tend to contain milk or extra binding ingredients and closely resemble ice cream, while sorbets tend to be lighter, often consisting simply of ice and fruit juice or liqueur. This distinction, however, was not so clear-cut in the past, when sherbet covered a wider variety of cooling drinks and desserts than it most often does today. The word sorbet first appears in English in the 1500s and is a borrowing of French sorbet, itself a borrowing of Italian sorbetto. The Italian word comes from the same Ottoman Turkish šerbet that gave us sherbet.

sherbet

(ˈʃɜːbət)
n
1. (Cookery) a fruit-flavoured slightly effervescent powder, eaten as a sweet or used to make a drink: lemon sherbet.
2. (Cookery) US and Canadian a water ice made from fruit juice, egg whites, milk, etc. Also called (in Britain and certain other countries): sorbet
3. (Brewing) slang Austral beer
4. (Cookery) a cooling Oriental drink of sweetened fruit juice
5. informal South African a euphemistic word for shit
[C17: from Turkish şerbet, from Persian sharbat, from Arabic sharbah drink, from shariba to drink]

sher•bet

(ˈʃɜr bɪt)

n.
1. Also, sher′bert (-bərt) a frozen fruit-flavored ice with milk, egg white, or gelatin added.
2. Brit. a drink made of sweetened diluted fruit juice.
[1595–1605; < Turkish < Persian sharbat < Arabic sharbah a drink]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sherbet - a frozen dessert made primarily of fruit juice and sugar, but also containing milk or egg-white or gelatin
frozen dessert - any of various desserts prepared by freezing
Translations
sorbetti

sherbet

[ˈʃɜːbət] N
1. (Brit) (= powder) → polvos mpl azucarados
2. (US) (= water ice) → sorbete m

sherbet

[ˈʃɜːrbət] n
(British) (powder) sucrerie consistant en une poudre qui entre en effervescence au contact de la salive
(US) (= water ice) → sorbet m

sherbet

n (= powder)Brausepulver nt; (= drink)Brause f, → Sorbet m or nt; (US: = water ice) → Fruchteis nt

sherbet

[ˈʃɜːbət] n (Brit) (powder) polvere effervescente al gusto di frutta (Am) (water ice) → sorbetto
References in classic literature ?
The warmly cool, clear, ringing, perfumed, overflowing, redundant days, were as crystal goblets of Persian sherbet, heaped up --flaked up, with rose-water snow.
When the King handed an iced Sherbet to Chatillon, the Sultan said," It is thou that givest it to him, not I.
At this moment two women entered, bringing salvers filled with ices and sherbet, which they placed on two small tables appropriated to that purpose.
She caused fowls to be slain; she sent for vegetables, and the sober, slow- thinking gardener, nigh as old as she, sweated for it; she took spices, and milk, and onion, with little fish from the brooks - anon limes for sherbets, fat quails from the pits, then chicken-livers upon a skewer, with sliced ginger between.
With the summer heat hitting Delhi already, Sherbet Station was a refreshing stall to drop by at.
The Bank will provide a US$ 6 million loan, of which US$ 1 million will come from the International Cooperation and Development Fund (TaiwanICDF), to Datly Sherbet, one of the leading pastry producers in Turkmenistan.
Datly Sherbet is already offering families locally made bakery products.
When the sherbet dissolves and infuses into the fruit, fill the glass with tonic water and ice-cubes - voila
MUZAFFARGARH -- Utility Stores Corporation (USC) has further reduced the prices of already subsidized commodities and Sherbet by Rs 3 to 5, officials said on Friday.
SHERBET, DSc, FRSC, FRCPath, Institute for Molecular Medicine, Huntington Beach CA, USA and University of Newcastle upon Tyne UK.
So it is only relatively recently I realised it was because car drivers - and before them carriage drivers - are awful people who drive through puddles, and it is better that I get wet rather than my female walking buddy who, presumably, is made of sherbet and blotting paper.
Hosted by the Anchorage Economic Development Corporation (AEDC), the Pitchon-a-Train competition brought ideas that ranged from commercial Bitcoin applications to drone surveillance technology, but it was Marc Wheeler of the Juneau cafe Coppa who wooed the judges most with his rhubarb sherbet.