sheriff


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sher·iff

 (shĕr′ĭf)
n.
1. A public officer in the United States with responsibility for certain law enforcement and administrative legal duties, such as making arrests and serving processes, usually for a particular county.
2. A public officer in various other countries performing certain law enforcement, judicial, or ceremonial functions.

[Middle English, the representative of royal authority in a shire, from Old English scīrgerēfa : scīr, shire + gerēfa, reeve.]

sheriff

(ˈʃɛrɪf)
n
1. (Law) (in the US) the chief law-enforcement officer in a county: popularly elected, except in Rhode Island
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in England and Wales) the chief executive officer of the Crown in a county, having chiefly ceremonial duties.
3. (Professions) (in Scotland) a judge in any of the sheriff courts
4. (Law) (in Scotland) a judge in any of the sheriff courts
5. (Professions) (in Australia) an administrative officer of the Supreme Court, who enforces judgments and the execution of writs, empanels juries, etc
6. (Law) (in Australia) an administrative officer of the Supreme Court, who enforces judgments and the execution of writs, empanels juries, etc
7. (Professions) (in New Zealand) an officer of the High Court
8. (Law) (in New Zealand) an officer of the High Court
[Old English scīrgerēfa, from scīr shire1 + gerēfa reeve1]
ˈsheriffdom n

sher•iff

(ˈʃɛr ɪf)

n.
1. the law-enforcement officer of a county or other civil subdivision of a state.
2. (formerly) an important civil officer in an English shire.
[before 1050; Old English scīrgerēfa. See shire, reeve1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sheriff - the principal law-enforcement officer in a countysheriff - the principal law-enforcement officer in a county
law officer, lawman, peace officer - an officer of the law

sheriff

noun
Related words
adjective shrieval
Translations
الشَّريف
šerif
sherif
seriff
lögreglustjóri
šerifas
šerifs
šerif
šerif
şerif

sheriff

[ˈʃerɪf]
A. N (in US) → alguacil m, sheriff m; (in England) → gobernador m civil; (in Scotland) → juez mf
B. CPD sheriff court N (Scot) → tribunal m de distrito

sheriff

[ˈʃɛrɪf] nshérif m

sheriff

nSheriff m; (Scot) → Friedensrichter(in) m(f)

sheriff

[ˈʃɛrɪf] nsceriffo

sheriff

(ˈʃerif) noun
in the United States, the chief law officer of a county, concerned with maintaining peace and order.
References in classic literature ?
These forests were guarded by the King's Foresters, the chief of whom, in each wood, was no mean man but equal in authority to the Sheriff in his walled town, or even to my lord Bishop in his abbey.
Rob's father had two other enemies besides Fitzwalter, in the persons of the lean Sheriff of Nottingham and the fat Bishop of Hereford.
The Fair is on at Nottingham, and the Sheriff proclaims an archer's tournament.
Such was the aspect under which the place presented itself to Sheriff Adams and two other men who had come out from Marshall to look at it.
Carelessly opening the front door, which to his surprise was not locked, the sheriff was amazed to see, lying on the floor of the passage into which it opened, a confused heap of men's apparel.
The sheriff grasped one of the outthrown arms; it was as rigid as iron, and the application of a gentle force rocked the entire body without altering the relation of its parts.
Now it was told before how two hundred pounds were set upon Robin Hood's head, and how the Sheriff of Nottingham swore that he himself would seize Robin, both because he would fain have the two hundred pounds and because the slain man was a kinsman of his own.
Then one of his men who was near him said, "Good master, thou wottest not the force that Robin Hood has about him and how little he cares for warrant of king or sheriff.
Then I hold all Nottingham men to be cowards," said the Sheriff.
The door was unfastened, and Richard entered, with the freedom that characterized not only the intercourse between the cousins, but the ordinary manners of the sheriff.
The sheriff took the letter, but without turning his eyes on the writing, for he was examining the appearance of the other with astonishment.
No, no, ‘Duke,” cried the sheriff, squeezing his hand, “ I am your man, just now; we are sister’s children, and blood, after all, is the best cement to make friendship stick together.