shingles


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shin·gles

 (shĭng′gəlz)
pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
An acute viral infection characterized by inflammation of the sensory ganglia of certain spinal or cranial nerves and the eruption of vesicles along the affected nerve path. It usually strikes only one side of the body and is often accompanied by severe neuralgia. Also called herpes zoster.

[Middle English, alteration (influenced by Old French cengles, pl. of cengle, shingles, and by Old French sengle, single, chingle, belt) of Medieval Latin cingulus (translation of Greek zōstēr, girdle, shingles, from the fact that the inflammation often extends around the middle of the body), variant of Latin cingulum, girdle, from cingere, to gird; see kenk- in Indo-European roots.]

shingles

(ˈʃɪŋɡəlz)
n
(Pathology) (functioning as singular) an acute viral disease affecting the ganglia of certain nerves, characterized by inflammation, pain, and skin eruptions along the course of the affected nerve. Technical names: herpes zoster or zoster
[C14: from Medieval Latin cingulum girdle, rendering Greek zōnē zone]

shin•gles

(ˈʃɪŋ gəlz)

n. (used with a sing. or pl. v.)
a disease caused by the herpes zoster virus, characterized by skin eruptions and pain along the course of involved sensory nerves.
[1350–1400; < Medieval Latin cingulum (Latin: girdle; compare cincture)]

shingles

A severe and painful form of chicken pox suffered mostly by adults aged over 50. It demands a lengthy convalescence.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shingles - eruptions along a nerve path often accompanied by severe neuralgiashingles - eruptions along a nerve path often accompanied by severe neuralgia
herpes - viral diseases causing eruptions of the skin or mucous membrane
Translations
داء الحَصْبَه ،الحَصْباء، القوباء
opar
helvedesild
vyöruusu
övsömör
ristill
fuoco di s. Antoniofuoco di Sant'Antonio
dedervinė
jostas roze
cobrãoherpes-zósterzona
pasovec
bältros
su çiçeğizona

shingles

[ˈʃɪŋglz] NPL (Med) → herpes msing (zoster)

shingles

[ˈʃɪŋgəlz] n (MEDICINE)zona mshin guard shin pad nprotège-tibia m

shingles

n sing (Med) → Gürtelrose f

shingles

[ˈʃɪŋglz] nsg (Med) → fuoco di Sant'Antonio

shingles

(ˈʃiŋglz) noun singular
a kind of infectious disease causing a rash of painful blisters.

shin·gles

n. pop. culebrilla, herpes zóster, erupción inflamatoria de la piel con vesículas o ampollas gen. localizadas en el tronco.

shingles

n herpes zóster, culebrilla (fam), zona m (fam)
References in classic literature ?
A NEGRO in a boat, gathering driftwood, saw a sleeping Alligator, and, thinking it was a log, fell to estimating the number of shingles it would make for his new cabin.
North Shingles Villa, Aldborough, Suffolk, July 22d.
Bygrave, Miss Bygrave; North Shingles Villa, Aldborough.
In such a neighborhood as this, boards and shingles, lime and bricks, are cheaper and more easily obtained than suitable caves, or whole logs, or bark in sufficient quantities, or even well-tempered clay or flat stones.
Before winter I built a chimney, and shingled the sides of my house, which were already impervious to rain, with imperfect and sappy shingles made of the first slice of the log, whose edges I was obliged to straighten with a plane.
He took it up and disclosed a shapely little treasure-house whose bottom and sides were of shingles.
Ogg's, he saw the distant future before him as he might have seen a tempting stretch of smooth sandy beach beyond a belt of flinty shingles; he was on the grassy bank then, and thought the shingles might soon be passed.
When I dived for him, the poor little man was lying quietly coiled up at the bottom, in a hollow of shingle, looking by many degrees smaller than I had ever seen him look before.
All the main valleys in the Cordillera are characterized by having, on both sides, a fringe or terrace of shingle and sand, rudely stratified, and generally of considerable thickness.
Then the duke took and wrote out a sign on a shingle so:
Beyond the sea-wall there curves for miles in a vast and regular sweep the barren beach of shingle, with the village of Brenzett standing out darkly across the water, a spire in a clump of trees; and still further out the perpendicular column of a lighthouse, look- ing in the distance no bigger than a lead pencil, marks the vanishing-point of the land.
Its windows are without glass, its doorways without doors; there are wide breaches in the shingle roof, and for lack of paint the weatherboarding is a dun gray.