shingly


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shin·gle 1

 (shĭng′gəl)
n.
1. A thin oblong piece of material, such as wood or slate, that is laid in overlapping rows to cover the roof or sides of a house or other building.
2. Informal A small signboard, as one indicating a professional office: After passing the bar exam, she hung out her shingle.
3. A woman's close-cropped haircut.
v.tr. shin·gled, shin·gling, shin·gles
1. To cover (a roof or building) with shingles.
2. To cut (hair) short and close to the head.

[Middle English, from Old English scindel, scingal, from Late Latin scindula, alteration of Latin scandula (influenced by scindere, to split).]

shin′gler n.

shin·gle 2

 (shĭng′gəl)
n.
1. Beach gravel consisting of large smooth pebbles.
2. A stretch of shore or beach covered with such gravel.

[Middle English.]

shin′gly adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.shingly - abounding in small stones; "landed at a shingly little beach"
rough, unsmooth - having or caused by an irregular surface; "trees with rough bark"; "rough ground"; "rough skin"; "rough blankets"; "his unsmooth face"
Translations

shingly

[ˈʃɪŋglɪ] ADJguijarroso

shingly

adj beachsteinig, voller Kieselsteine

shingly

[ˈʃɪŋglɪ] adj (beach) → ciottoloso/a
References in classic literature ?
She came on till he could just see her -- a shadow ascending the shingly slope, and growing out of the blackness of the night.
In the old monastic days he remembered to have heard such a sound when he had walked out one windy night at Bucklershard, and had listened to the long waves breaking upon the shingly shore.
Even at night, the river was specked with lanterns, and lurid with fires; far-off creeks, into which the tide washed as it changed, had their knots of watchers, listening to the lapping of the stream, and looking out for any burden it might bear; remote shingly causeways near the sea, and lonely points off which there was a race of water, had their unwonted flaring cressets and rough-coated figures when the next day dawned; but no trace of Edwin Drood revisited the light of the sun.
With a threatening gesture of his hand, he turned from the door, and Ferrier heard his heavy step scrunching along the shingly path.
There they lay, here a man felled by an axe, there another struck down by a stone picked up then and there from the shingly beach; here a man battered to death with a club, there another burned to death with a brand from the fire.