ship


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ship

 (shĭp)
n.
1.
a. A vessel of considerable size for deep-water navigation.
b. A sailing vessel having three or more square-rigged masts.
2. An aircraft or spacecraft.
3. The crew of one of these vessels.
4. One's fortune: When my ship comes in, I'll move to a larger house.
v. shipped, ship·ping, ships
v.tr.
1. To place or receive on board a ship: shipped the cargo in the hold.
2. To cause to be transported; send. See Synonyms at send1.
3. To place (a ship's mast or rudder, for example) in its working position.
4.
a. To bring into a ship or boat: ship an anchor.
b. To place (an oar) in a resting position inside a boat without removing it from the oarlock.
5. To hire (a person) for work on a ship.
6. To take in (water) over the side of a ship.
v.intr.
1. To go aboard a ship; embark.
2. To be sent as a delivery: The books that we ordered shipped from warehouse yesterday.
3. To travel by ship.
4. To hire oneself out or enlist for service on a ship.
Phrasal Verb:
ship out
1. To accept a position on board a ship and serve as a crew member: shipped out on a tanker.
2. To leave, as for a distant place: troops shipping out to the war zone.
3. To send, as to a distant place.
4. Informal To quit, resign from, or otherwise vacate a position: Shape up or ship out.
Idiom:
tight ship
A well-managed and efficient business, household, or organization: We run a tight ship.

[Middle English, from Old English scip.]

ship′pa·ble adj.

ship

(ʃɪp)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a vessel propelled by engines or sails for navigating on the water, esp a large vessel that cannot be carried aboard another, as distinguished from a boat
2. (Nautical Terms) nautical a large sailing vessel with three or more square-rigged masts
3. (Nautical Terms) the crew of a ship
4. (Aeronautics) short for airship, spaceship
5. (Astronautics) short for airship, spaceship
6. informal any vehicle or conveyance
7. when one's ship comes in when one has become successful or wealthy
vb, ships, shipping or shipped
8. to place, transport, or travel on any conveyance, esp aboard a ship: ship the microscopes by aeroplane; can we ship tomorrow?.
9. (Nautical Terms) (tr) nautical to take (water) over the side
10. (Nautical Terms) to bring or go aboard a vessel: to ship oars.
11. informal (often foll by: off) to send away, often in order to be rid of: they shipped the children off to boarding school.
12. (Nautical Terms) (intr) to engage to serve aboard a ship: I shipped aboard a Liverpool liner.
13. (General Sporting Terms) informal (tr) to concede (a goal): Celtic have shipped eight goals in three away matches.
[Old English scip; related to Old Norse skip, Old High German skif ship, scipfī cup]
ˈshippable adj

ship

(ʃɪp)

n., v. shipped, ship•ping. n.
1. a vessel, esp. a large oceangoing one propelled by sails or engines.
2. a sailing vessel square-rigged on all of three or more masts, having jibs, staysails, and a spanker on the aftermost mast.
3. the crew and passengers of a vessel.
4. an airship, airplane, or spacecraft.
v.t.
5. to send or transport by ship, rail, truck, plane, etc.
6. to take in (water) over the side, as a vessel does when waves break over it.
7. to bring into a ship or boat: Ship the anchor.
8. to engage (a person) for service on a ship.
9. to fix in a ship or boat in the proper place for use: Ship the oars.
10. to send away: We shipped the kids off to camp.
v.i.
11. to go on board or travel by ship; embark.
12. to engage to serve on a ship.
13. ship out,
a. to leave, esp. for another country or assignment.
b. to send away, esp. to another country or assignment.
c. to quit, resign, or be fired from a job: Shape up or ship out!
14. ship over, to reenlist, esp. in the navy.
Idioms:
1. run a tight ship, to exercise strict control over a company, organization, or the like.
2. when or if one's ship comes in or home, when or if one finally becomes wealthy.
[before 900; (n.) Middle English; Old English scip, c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Old Norse, Gothic skip, Old High German scif]
ship′less, adj.

-ship

a noun-forming suffix denoting state or condition, usu. added to personal nouns: friendship; kinship; statesmanship.
[Middle English, Old English -scipe; akin to shape; c. dial. Frisian, dial. Dutch schip]

boat

ship
1. 'boat'

A boat is a small vessel for travelling on water, especially one that carries only a few people.

John took me down the river in the old boat.
...a fishing boat.
2. 'ship'

A larger vessel is usually referred to as a ship.

The ship was due to sail the following morning.

However, in conversation large passenger ships which travel short distances are sometimes called boats.

She was getting off at Hamburg to take the boat to Stockholm.

Be Careful!
When you are describing the way in which someone travels, you do not say that they travel 'by the boat' or 'by the ship'. You say that they travel by boat or by ship.

We are going by boat.
They were sent home by ship.

ship


Past participle: shipped
Gerund: shipping

Imperative
ship
ship
Present
I ship
you ship
he/she/it ships
we ship
you ship
they ship
Preterite
I shipped
you shipped
he/she/it shipped
we shipped
you shipped
they shipped
Present Continuous
I am shipping
you are shipping
he/she/it is shipping
we are shipping
you are shipping
they are shipping
Present Perfect
I have shipped
you have shipped
he/she/it has shipped
we have shipped
you have shipped
they have shipped
Past Continuous
I was shipping
you were shipping
he/she/it was shipping
we were shipping
you were shipping
they were shipping
Past Perfect
I had shipped
you had shipped
he/she/it had shipped
we had shipped
you had shipped
they had shipped
Future
I will ship
you will ship
he/she/it will ship
we will ship
you will ship
they will ship
Future Perfect
I will have shipped
you will have shipped
he/she/it will have shipped
we will have shipped
you will have shipped
they will have shipped
Future Continuous
I will be shipping
you will be shipping
he/she/it will be shipping
we will be shipping
you will be shipping
they will be shipping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been shipping
you have been shipping
he/she/it has been shipping
we have been shipping
you have been shipping
they have been shipping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been shipping
you will have been shipping
he/she/it will have been shipping
we will have been shipping
you will have been shipping
they will have been shipping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been shipping
you had been shipping
he/she/it had been shipping
we had been shipping
you had been shipping
they had been shipping
Conditional
I would ship
you would ship
he/she/it would ship
we would ship
you would ship
they would ship
Past Conditional
I would have shipped
you would have shipped
he/she/it would have shipped
we would have shipped
you would have shipped
they would have shipped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freightship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
pitching, lurch, pitch - abrupt up-and-down motion (as caused by a ship or other conveyance); "the pitching and tossing was quite exciting"
abandoned ship, derelict - a ship abandoned on the high seas
auxiliary boiler, donkey boiler - (nautical) an extra boiler (as a ship's boiler that is used while the ship is in port)
auxiliary engine, donkey engine - (nautical) a small engine (as one used on board ships to operate a windlass)
bay - a compartment on a ship between decks; often used as a hospital; "they put him in the sick bay"
belaying pin - a wood or metal bar to which a rope can be secured (as on a ship or in mountain climbing)
bilge pump - a pump to remove bilgewater
bilge well - (nautical) a well where seepage drains to be pumped away
blockade-runner - a ship that runs through or around a naval blockade
bitt, bollard - a strong post (as on a wharf or quay or ship for attaching mooring lines); "the road was closed to vehicular traffic with bollards"
brig - a penal institution (especially on board a ship)
bulkhead - a partition that divides a ship or plane into compartments
bulwark - a fencelike structure around a deck (usually plural)
cargo area, cargo deck, cargo hold, storage area, hold - the space in a ship or aircraft for storing cargo
cargo ship, cargo vessel - a ship designed to carry cargo
crow's nest - platform for a lookout at or near the top of a mast
davit - a crane-like device (usually one of a pair) for suspending or lowering equipment (as a lifeboat)
deck - any of various platforms built into a vessel
engine room, engineering - a room (as on a ship) in which the engine is located
fin - a stabilizer on a ship that resembles the fin of a fish
flagship - the ship that carries the commander of a fleet and flies his flag
fo'c'sle, forecastle - living quarters consisting of a superstructure in the bow of a merchant ship where the crew is housed
funnel - (nautical) smokestack consisting of a shaft for ventilation or the passage of smoke (especially the smokestack of a ship)
caboose, cookhouse, ship's galley, galley - the area for food preparation on a ship
gas-turbine ship - a ship powered by a gas turbine
gyrostabiliser, gyrostabilizer - a stabilizer consisting of a heavy gyroscope that spins on a vertical axis; reduces side-to-side rolling of a ship or plane
helm - steering mechanism for a vessel; a mechanical device by which a vessel is steered
hospital ship - a ship built to serve as a hospital; used for wounded in wartime
hulk - a ship that has been wrecked and abandoned
iceboat, icebreaker - a ship with a reinforced bow to break up ice and keep channels open for navigation
lightship - a ship equipped like a lighthouse and anchored where a permanent lighthouse would be impracticable
log - measuring instrument that consists of a float that trails from a ship by a knotted line in order to measure the ship's speed through the water
lubber's hole - hole in a platform on a mast through which a sailor can climb without going out on the shrouds
magnetic mine - (nautical) a marine mine that is detonated by a mechanism that responds to magnetic material (as the steel hull of a ship)
minelayer - ship equipped for laying marine mines
minesweeper - ship equipped to detect and then destroy or neutralize or remove marine mines
nuclear-powered ship - ship whose motive power comes from the energy of a nuclear reactor
passenger ship - a ship built to carry passengers
pirate ship, pirate - a ship that is manned by pirates
planking - (nautical) a covering or flooring constructed of planks (as on a ship)
embrasure, porthole, port - an opening (in a wall or ship or armored vehicle) for firing through
porthole - a window in a ship or airplane
ratlin, ratline - (nautical) a small horizontal rope between the shrouds of a sailing ship; they form a ladder for climbing aloft
ridge rope - either of a pair of lifelines running alongside the bowsprit of a ship
riding bitt - one of the large bitts used to secure the cable of a dropped anchor
school ship, training ship - a ship used to train students as sailors
screw propeller, screw - a propeller with several angled blades that rotates to push against water or air
sea anchor, drogue - restraint consisting of a canvas covered frame that floats behind a vessel; prevents drifting or maintains the heading into a wind
Verb1.ship - transport commerciallyship - transport commercially    
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
barge - transport by barge on a body of water
railroad - transport by railroad
despatch, dispatch, send off - send away towards a designated goal
forward, send on - send or ship onward from an intermediate post or station in transit; "forward my mail"
2.ship - hire for work on a ship
hire, employ, engage - engage or hire for work; "They hired two new secretaries in the department"; "How many people has she employed?"
3.ship - go on board
board, get on - get on board of (trains, buses, ships, aircraft, etc.)
emplane, enplane - board a plane
4.ship - travel by ship
journey, travel - travel upon or across; "travel the oceans"
5.ship - place on board a ship; "ship the cargo in the hold of the vessel"
lay, place, put, set, position, pose - put into a certain place or abstract location; "Put your things here"; "Set the tray down"; "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children"; "Place emphasis on a certain point"
reship - place on a ship again or transfer to another ship; "reship the cargo"

ship

noun
1. vessel, boat, craft, liner We went by ship over to America.
verb
1. send, take, run, bring, carry, bear, transfer, ferry, convey Food is being shipped to drought-stricken countries. see boats and ships
Quotations
"Ships that pass in the night, and speak each other in passing;"
"Only a signal shown and a distant voice in the darkness" [Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Tales of a Wayside Inn]

ship

verb
To cause (something) to be conveyed to a destination:
Translations
سَفِينَةسَفينَة فَضائِيَّهسَفينَهيُرْسِل او يَشْحَن بالسَّفينَه
корабпараход
loďplavidlodopravit lodí
skibsende
جهازکشتی
laivalaivatatoimittaaaluslähettää
जहाज़पोत
brodlađa
hajóhajón szállítszállít
kapal
geimskipsenda/flytja meî skipiskip
船舶出荷する海上輸送する発送する
선박
navis
ekspeditoriusišgabentilaivailaivaslaivo savininkas
kosmosa kuģiskuģisnogādāt/transportēt ar kuģi
schipverschepen
dopraviť loďou
ladjaposlati tovor
brodlađaбродлађа
fartygfraktaskeppa
เรือ
gemigemiyle göndermekhava aracıvapur
جہاز
con tàu

ship

[ʃɪp]
A. N
1. (= sea-going vessel) (gen) → barco m; (for carrying cargo) (also Mil) → buque m, navío m
Her or His Majesty's Ship Victoryel buque or navío Victory de la Marina Real Británica
to abandon shipabandonar el barco
on board shipa bordo
by shipen barco, por barco
the good ship Beagleel buque Beagle, el Beagle
to jump shipabandonar el barco, desertar
to take ship forembarcarse para
when my ship comes in (fig) → cuando lleguen las vacas gordas
ships that pass in the nightpersonas que pasan por la vida y desaparecen
the ship of the desert (= the camel) → el camello
2. (= aircraft, spacecraft) → nave f
B. VT
1. (= transport) → enviar, consignar
to ship sth/sb intraer algo/a algn
to ship sth/sb off (lit) → enviar algo/a algn
he shipped all his sons off to boarding school (fig) → mandó a todos sus hijos a un internado
to ship sth/sb outenviar algo/a algn
a new engine had to be shipped out to themhubo que enviarles un nuevo motor
2. (Naut)
we are shipping waterestamos haciendo agua, nos está entrando agua
3. [+ oars] → desarmar
C. CPD ship broker Nagente mf marítimo/a
ship canal Ncanal m de navegación
ship chandler, ship's chandler Nproveedor m de efectos navales, abastecedor m de buques
ship's company Ntripulación f
ship's doctor Nmédico m de a bordo
ship's manifest Nmanifiesto m del buque
ship-to-shore radio Nradio f de barco a costa

ship

[ˈʃɪp]
n (= large boat) → navire m; (smaller)bateau m
to go by ship → prendre le bateau
to go by ship to New York → prendre le bateau pour New York
to send sth by ship → envoyer qch par bateau
on board ship → à bord sailing ship, cargo ship, passenger ship, merchant ship
vt
(= send) (gen)expédier; (by sea)expédier par bateau
(= load) → charger, embarquer
to ship water → embarquer de l'eau
ship off
vt sep (= send away) → expédier
ship out
vt sep (= send) (gen)expédier; (by sea)expédier par bateau
vi (= leave) → prendre la mer

ship

n
Schiff nt; the good ship Venusdie gute Venus; on board shipan Bord; to take ship (for) (liter)sich einschiffen (nach); when my ship comes home or in (fig)wenn ich das große Los ziehe; ship of the lineKriegsschiff nt; ship of the desertWüstenschiff nt; the great ship of statedas Staatsschiff
(US inf: = plane) → Maschine f; (= spaceship)(Raum)schiff nt
vt
(= take on board)an Bord nehmen; mastsetzen; to ship oarsdie Riemen einlegen; to ship waterleck sein; we’re shipping waterunser Boot leckt or ist leck
(= transport)versenden; coal, grain etcverfrachten; (esp by sea) → verschiffen
vi (= take employment)anheuern

ship

:
ship biscuit
n (US) → Schiffszwieback m
shipboard
n on shipan Bord (eines/des Schiffes)
adjan Bord (eines/des Schiffes); a ship romanceeine Romanze auf See
shipborne aircraft
n (Naut, Aviat) → Bordflugzeug nt
shipbreaker
nSchiffsverschrotter m
shipbuilder
nSchiffbauer(in) m(f); a firm of shipseine Schiffbaufirma
shipbuilding
nSchiffbau m
ship canal
n(See)kanal m
ship chandler
nSchiffsausrüster(in) m(f)
shipload
nSchiffsladung f; the tourists were arriving by the ship (inf)ganze Schiffsladungen von Touristen kamen an
shipmaster
n (Naut) → (Handels)kapitän m
shipmate
nSchiffskamerad(in) m(f)

ship

:
ship-to-shore radio
nSeefunk m
shipway
n (= support)Stapel m; (= ship canal)(See)kanal m, → Schifffahrtsweg m
shipwreck
n (lit, fig)Schiffbruch m; (fig also)Scheitern nt; in the shipbei dem Schiffbruch
vt (lit)schiffbrüchig werden lassen; (fig)zum Scheitern bringen, scheitern lassen; to be shiped (lit)schiffbrüchig sein; (fig)Schiffbruch erleiden, scheitern
shipwright
nSchiffbauer(in) m(f)
shipyard
n(Schiffs)werft f

ship

[ʃɪp]
1. nnave f
Her (or His) Majesty's Ship Ark Royal → l'Ark Royal f
on board ship → a bordo
ship's company → equipaggio
ship's papers → carte fpl di bordo
ship's stores → riserve fpl di bordo
2. vt
a. (take on board, goods, water) → imbarcare; (oars) → tirare in barca
b. (transport, usu by ship) → spedire (via mare)
a new engine had to be shipped out to them → hanno dovuto spedire loro un motore nuovo

ship

(ʃip) noun
1. a large boat. The ship sank and all the passengers and crew were drowned.
2. any of certain types of transport that fly. a spaceship.
verbpast tense, past participle shipped
to send or transport by ship. The books were shipped to Australia.
ˈshipment noun
1. a load of goods sent by sea. a shipment of wine from Portugal.
2. the sending of goods by sea.
ˈshipper noun
a person who arranges for goods to be shipped. a firm of shippers.
ˈshipping noun
ships taken as a whole. The harbour was full of shipping.
ˈship-broker noun
1. an agent whose job is to buy or sell ships.
2. an insurance agent for ships.
ˈshipbuilder noun
a person whose business is the construction of ships. a firm of shipbuilders.
ˈshipbuilding noun
ˈshipowner noun
a person or company that owns a ship or ships.
ˌshipˈshape adjective
in good order. She left everything shipshape in her room when she left.
ˈshipwreck noun
1. the accidental sinking or destruction of a ship. There were many shipwrecks on the rocky coast.
2. a wrecked ship. an old shipwreck on the shore.
verb
We were shipwrecked off the coast of Africa.
ˈshipyard noun
a place where ships are built or repaired.
ship water
(of a boat) to let water in over the side. The boat shipped water and nearly capsized.

ship

سَفِينَة loď skib Schiff πλοίο embarcación laiva navire brod nave 선박 schip skip statek navio корабль fartyg เรือ gemi con tàu
References in classic literature ?
Don't laugh, Jo, gentlemen really are very necessary aboard ship, to hold on to, or to wait upon one, and as they have nothing to do, it's a mercy to make them useful, otherwise they would smoke themselves to death, I'm afraid.
That is not my object in coming here and forcing my acquaintance- ship upon you.
They ship so much grain, they have influence with the railroad people.
No; it was a big, ugly, antique, but convenient house, embodying a few features of a building still older, half-replaced and half-utilized, in which I had the fancy of our being almost as lost as a handful of passengers in a great drifting ship.
With a philosophical flourish Cato throws himself upon his sword; I quietly take to the ship.
Hand in hand, ship and breeze blew on; but the breeze came faster than the ship, and soon the Pequod began to rock.
NOW for six whole weeks they went sailing on and on, over the rolling sea, following the swallow who flew before the ship to show them the way.
Now, one day it was announced in the village that the King had issued a decree, offering his daughter, the Princess, in marriage to whoever should build a ship that could fly.
76} So long as the day waxed and it was still morning, we held our own against them, though they were more in number than we; but as the sun went down, towards the time when men loose their oxen, the Cicons got the better of us, and we lost half a dozen men from every ship we had; so we got away with those that were left.
A ship may have left her port some time before; she may have been at sea, in the fullest sense of the phrase, for days; but, for all that, as long as the coast she was about to leave remained in sight, a southern-going ship of yesterday had not in the sailor's sense begun the enterprise of a passage.
But first he summoned a meeting of the elders at the ship of Nestor king of Pylos, and when they were assembled he laid a cunning counsel before them.
The wind was fresh and fair from the southwest, and the ship was soon out of sight of land and free from the apprehended danger of interruption.

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