shoal


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shoal 1

 (shōl)
n.
1. A shallow place in a body of water.
2. A sandy elevation of the bottom of a body of water, constituting a hazard to navigation; a sandbank or sandbar.
v. shoaled, shoal·ing, shoals
v.intr.
To become shallow: The river shoals suddenly here from eight to two fathoms.
v.tr.
1. To make shallow: The approach to the harbor was shoaled in the storm.
2. To come or sail into a shallower part of.
adj.
Having little depth; shallow.

[Middle English shold, shallow, shallows, from Old English sceald, shallow.]

shoal 2

 (shōl)
n.
1. A large school of fish or other aquatic animals.
2. A large group; a crowd: a shoal of advisers.
intr.v. shoaled, shoal·ing, shoals
To come together in large numbers: The fish were shoaling.

[Probably Middle Low German or Middle Dutch schōle; see skel- in Indo-European roots.]

shoal

(ʃəʊl)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a stretch of shallow water
2. (Physical Geography) a sandbank or rocky area in a stretch of water, esp one that is visible at low water
vb
3. to make or become shallow
4. (Nautical Terms) (intr) nautical to sail into shallower water
adj
5. a less common word for shallow
6. (Nautical Terms) nautical (of the draught of a vessel) drawing little water
[Old English sceald shallow]
ˈshoaliness n

shoal

(ʃəʊl)
n
1. (Zoology) a large group of certain aquatic animals, esp fish
2. a large group of people or things
vb
(intr) to collect together in such a group
[Old English scolu; related to Middle Low German, Middle Dutch schōle school2]

shoal1

(ʃoʊl)

n.
1. a place where a sea, river, or other body of water is shallow.
2. a sandbank or sand bar in the bed of a body of water, esp. one visible at low tide.
adj.
3. (of water) shallow.
v.i.
4. to become shallow or more shallow.
v.t.
5. to make shallow.
6. to sail so as to lessen the depth of (the water under a vessel).
[before 900; (adj.) Old English sceald shallow]

shoal2

(ʃoʊl)

n.
1. any large number of persons or things.
2. a school of fish.
v.i.
3. to collect in a shoal; throng.
[1570–80; earlier shole, probably < Middle Dutch, Middle Low German schōle]

shoal

(shōl)
A sandy elevation of the bottom of a body of water; a sandbar.

shoal

- A synonym for "school," referring to a large number of fish swimming together.
See also related terms for swimming.

shoal

A sandbank or bar that makes water shoal; i.e., a sand-bank that is not rocky and on which there is a water depth of 6 fathoms or less.

Shoal

 a great number; a crowd; a throng: especially of fish.
Examples: shoal of bass; of boats, 1839; of crows, 1759; of eagles, 1801; of fish, 1579; of frogs, 1692; of goslings, 1584; of herrings, 1774; of martyrs, 1610; of minnows; of miracles, 1639; of novelties, 1900; of injured people, 1901; of perch; of pilchards; of quails, 1659; of seals, 1835; of shepherds, 1579; of sticklebacks; of texts, 1688; of troubles; of whales, 1836; of small troubles, 1858; shoals of actors and actresses, 1749; of letters; of people, 1881; of Scotsmen, 1791.

shoal


Past participle: shoaled
Gerund: shoaling

Imperative
shoal
shoal
Present
I shoal
you shoal
he/she/it shoals
we shoal
you shoal
they shoal
Preterite
I shoaled
you shoaled
he/she/it shoaled
we shoaled
you shoaled
they shoaled
Present Continuous
I am shoaling
you are shoaling
he/she/it is shoaling
we are shoaling
you are shoaling
they are shoaling
Present Perfect
I have shoaled
you have shoaled
he/she/it has shoaled
we have shoaled
you have shoaled
they have shoaled
Past Continuous
I was shoaling
you were shoaling
he/she/it was shoaling
we were shoaling
you were shoaling
they were shoaling
Past Perfect
I had shoaled
you had shoaled
he/she/it had shoaled
we had shoaled
you had shoaled
they had shoaled
Future
I will shoal
you will shoal
he/she/it will shoal
we will shoal
you will shoal
they will shoal
Future Perfect
I will have shoaled
you will have shoaled
he/she/it will have shoaled
we will have shoaled
you will have shoaled
they will have shoaled
Future Continuous
I will be shoaling
you will be shoaling
he/she/it will be shoaling
we will be shoaling
you will be shoaling
they will be shoaling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been shoaling
you have been shoaling
he/she/it has been shoaling
we have been shoaling
you have been shoaling
they have been shoaling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been shoaling
you will have been shoaling
he/she/it will have been shoaling
we will have been shoaling
you will have been shoaling
they will have been shoaling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been shoaling
you had been shoaling
he/she/it had been shoaling
we had been shoaling
you had been shoaling
they had been shoaling
Conditional
I would shoal
you would shoal
he/she/it would shoal
we would shoal
you would shoal
they would shoal
Past Conditional
I would have shoaled
you would have shoaled
he/she/it would have shoaled
we would have shoaled
you would have shoaled
they would have shoaled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shoal - a sandbank in a stretch of water that is visible at low tide
sandbank - a submerged bank of sand near a shore or in a river; can be exposed at low tide
2.shoal - a stretch of shallow watershoal - a stretch of shallow water    
body of water, water - the part of the earth's surface covered with water (such as a river or lake or ocean); "they invaded our territorial waters"; "they were sitting by the water's edge"
3.shoal - a large group of fish; "a school of small glittering fish swam by"
fish - any of various mostly cold-blooded aquatic vertebrates usually having scales and breathing through gills; "the shark is a large fish"; "in the living room there was a tank of colorful fish"
animal group - a group of animals
Verb1.shoal - make shallow; "The silt shallowed the canal"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
2.shoal - become shallow; "the lake shallowed over time"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"

shoal

noun
A shallow part of a body of water:
shallow (often used in plural).
adjective
Measuring little from bottom to top or surface:
Translations
سِرْب أو فَوْج من الأسْماكمِياه ضَحْلَه
hejnomělčinapísčina
=-bankebankestime
grynningar; sandrifmergî, torfa
barssēklis
sığlık yersürü

shoal

1 [ʃəʊl] N [of fish] → banco m

shoal

2 [ʃəʊl] N (= sandbank etc) → banco m de arena, bajío m, bajo m

shoal

[ˈʃəʊl] n [fish] → banc m

shoal

1
n (= shallow place)Untiefe f; (= sandbank)Sandbank f

shoal

2
n (of fish)Schwarm m; in shoals (letters, applications etc) → massenweise, in Massen; (people) → in hellen Scharen; shoals of lettersUnmengen plvon Briefen, eine Briefflut

shoal

[ʃəʊl] n (of fish) → banco

shoal1

(ʃəul) noun
a great number of fish swimming together in one place. The fishing-boats were searching for large shoals of fish.

shoal2

(ʃəul) noun
a shallow place in the sea etc; a sandbank. The boat grounded on a shoal.
References in classic literature ?
It jolted her up like everything, of course; but I was over the shoal water now, so I went right along, her eyes a-blazing higher and higher all the time, and told her every blame thing, from where we first struck that young fool going up to the steamboat, clear through to where she flung herself on to the king's breast at the front door and he kissed her sixteen or seventeen times -- and then up she jumps, with her face afire like sunset, and says:
A FEW minutes later Tom was in the shoal water of the bar, wading toward the Illinois shore.
Yes,'' said the Templar, ``I am, Rebecca, as thou hast spoken me, untaught, untamed and proud, that, amidst a shoal of empty fools and crafty bigots, I have retained the preeminent fortitude that places me above them.
All told, we had scarce two miles to run; but the navigation was delicate, the entrance to this northern anchorage was not only narrow and shoal, but lay east and west, so that the schooner must be nicely handled to be got in.
This time he went westward, because he had fallen on the trail of a great shoal of halibut, and he needed at least one hundred pounds of fish a day to keep him in good condition.
AND a shoal of other little fishes put their heads out, and laughed at Mr.
And, indeed, unless this shoal had a machine in its stomach, how could it change its position with such astonishing rapidity?
At that hour my bark hung on the topmost curl of a wave of fate, and I knew not on what shoal the onward rush of the billow might hurl it; I would not then attach her destiny to mine by the slightest thread; if doomed to split on the rock, or run a aground on the sand-bank, I was resolved no other vessel should share my disaster: but six weeks was a long time; and could it be that she was still well and doing well?
Every now and then a shoal of flying fish, scared from the water under the bows, would leap into the air, and fall the next moment like a shower of silver into the sea.
There was great affectation of stillness during all these manoeuvers, in order, as Richard assured them, “not to frighten the bass, who were running into the shoal waters, and who would approach the light if not disturbed by the sounds from the fishermen.
They were by the shoal under the first bridge-span, out of sight of hungry priests.
There was a soft grating sound, as though a boat had just touched in shoal water.