shock


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to shock: septic shock, hypovolemic shock, cardiogenic shock

shock 1

 (shŏk)
n.
1. A violent collision, impact, or explosion, or the force or movement resulting from this: The shock of the explosion blew out windows of every building on the street.
2.
a. Something that suddenly causes emotional distress: The news of his death was a shock to all of us.
b. A sudden feeling of distress: The shock of the news has not yet worn off.
3. A massive, acute physiological reaction usually to physical trauma, infection, or allergy, characterized by a marked loss of blood pressure, resulting in a diminished blood flow to body tissues and a rapid heart rate.
4. The sensation and muscular spasm caused by an electric current passing through the body or a body part.
5. A sudden economic disturbance, such as a rise in the price of a commodity.
6. A shock absorber.
v. shocked, shock·ing, shocks
v.tr.
1. To surprise and disturb greatly: We were shocked by his admission of wrongdoing.
2. To induce a state of physical shock in (an animal or person).
3.
a. To subject (an animal or person) to an electric shock.
b. To administer electric current to (a patient) to treat cardiac arrest or life-threatening arrhythmias.
c. To administer electroconvulsive therapy to (a patient).
v.intr. Archaic
To come into contact violently, as in battle; collide.

[French choc, from choquer, to collide with, from Old French chuquier, perhaps of Germanic origin.]

shock 2

 (shŏk)
n.
1. A number of sheaves of grain stacked upright in a field for drying.
2. A thick heavy mass: a shock of white hair.
tr.v. shocked, shock·ing, shocks
To gather (grain) into shocks.

[Middle English shok.]

shock

(ʃɒk)
vb
1. to experience or cause to experience extreme horror, disgust, surprise, etc: the atrocities shocked us; she shocks easily.
2. to cause a state of shock in (a person)
3. to come or cause to come into violent contact; jar
n
4. a sudden and violent jarring blow or impact
5. something that causes a sudden and violent disturbance in the emotions: the shock of her father's death made her ill.
6. (Pathology) pathol a state of bodily collapse or near collapse caused by circulatory failure or sudden lowering of the blood pressure, as from severe bleeding, burns, fright, etc
7. (Pathology) pathol pain and muscular spasm as the physical reaction to an electric current passing through the body
[C16: from Old French choc, from choquier to make violent contact with, of Germanic origin; related to Middle High German schoc]
ˈshockable adj
ˌshockaˈbility n

shock

(ʃɒk)
n
1. (Agriculture) a number of sheaves set on end in a field to dry
2. (Agriculture) a pile or stack of unthreshed corn
vb
(Agriculture) (tr) to set up (sheaves) in shocks
[C14: probably of Germanic origin; compare Middle Low German, Middle Dutch schok shock of corn, group of sixty]

shock

(ʃɒk)
n
a thick bushy mass, esp of hair
adj
rare bushy; shaggy
[C19: perhaps from shock2]

shock1

(ʃɒk)

n.
1. a sudden or violent disturbance of the emotions or sensibilities.
2. a sudden and violent blow or impact.
3. a sudden or violent commotion.
4. gravely diminished blood circulation caused by severe injury or pain, blood loss, or certain diseases and characterized by pallor, weak pulse, and very low blood pressure.
5. the physiological effect produced by the passage of an electric current through the body.
6. shocks, shock absorbers, esp. in the suspension of an automobile.
v.t.
7. to affect with intense surprise, horror, etc.
8. to give an electric shock to.
9. to strike against violently.
v.i.
10. to undergo a shock.
adj.
11. intended to scandalize or titillate an audience by breaking taboos, esp. by using vulgarity, obscenity, or ethnic slurs: shock radio; shock art.
[1555–65; < Middle French choc armed encounter, n. derivative of choquer to clash (in battle) < Germanic; compare Dutch schokken to shake, jolt, jerk]
shock′a•ble, adj.
shock`a•bil′i•ty, n.

shock3

(ʃɒk)

n.
1. a thick, bushy mass, as of hair.
adj.
2. shaggy, as hair.
[1810–20]

shock

(shŏk)
1. A life-threatening condition marked by a severe drop in blood pressure, resulting from serious injury or illness.
2. An instance of the passage of an electric current through the body. The amount of injury caused by electric shock depends on the type and strength of the current, the length of time the current is applied, and the route the current takes once it enters the body.

shock

  • shock - An encounter between two charging hostile forces.
  • enfant terrible - Actually applies to young adults (generally male) who go out of their way to shock or embarrass but at the same time are considered talented.
  • perculsive - Describing something that gives you a shock.
  • ay, chihuahua - This interjection expresses surprise or shock—even dismay, annoyance, or resignation.

Shock

 pile or heap of sheaves of grain, wheat, rye, etc.; a bunch or bundle of things; a crowd of people; a lot of sixty pieces.
Examples: shock of actors; of beans, 1862; of corns, 1584; of folks; of grain, 1584; of hair; of wheat, 1899.

Shock

 

See Also: CAUSE/EFFECT, SURPRISE

  1. As dazed as a man who has just been told he hasn’t long to live —Françoise Sagan
  2. Felt amazed, as if the clouds had blown away, as if the bare bones were finally visible —Louise Erdrich

    In Erdrich’s novel, The Beet Queen, the amazed feeling stems from a character’s realization that he is homosexual

  3. Felt as if I was being hit by a blast from a giant hair drier —Dominique Lapierre
  4. The first shock [of English society] is like a cold plunge —Robert Louis Stevenson
  5. He was white and shaken, like a dry martini —P. G. Wodehouse
  6. (Then the familiarity of the name … ) hit him like a contract cancellation —William Beechcroft
  7. [A brutal murder] shocked me and held onto me as if I’d shaken hands with a live wire —Jonathan Valin
  8. The shock … held everybody as in a still photo —Ray Bradbury
  9. The shock hit me like a fist under the ribs —David Brierly
  10. [Time awareness] shocking a douche of cold water —P. G. Wodehouse
  11. Shocking as the realization that you’re not invincible —Elyse Sommer
  12. Shocking realization … like a fist knocking the wind out of her —David Leavitt
  13. Shock [went through room] like the twang of a bow string —Iris Murdoch
  14. The shock numbed him out like a drug —George Garrett
  15. (She can) shock you like a lightning bolt at high noon —Aharon Megged
  16. Stunned … as if a good boxer had just caught me with a startling left hook and a stultifying right —Norman Mailer
  17. The sudden shock striking somewhere inside her chest like an electric bolt —William Styron

shock


Past participle: shocked
Gerund: shocking

Imperative
shock
shock
Present
I shock
you shock
he/she/it shocks
we shock
you shock
they shock
Preterite
I shocked
you shocked
he/she/it shocked
we shocked
you shocked
they shocked
Present Continuous
I am shocking
you are shocking
he/she/it is shocking
we are shocking
you are shocking
they are shocking
Present Perfect
I have shocked
you have shocked
he/she/it has shocked
we have shocked
you have shocked
they have shocked
Past Continuous
I was shocking
you were shocking
he/she/it was shocking
we were shocking
you were shocking
they were shocking
Past Perfect
I had shocked
you had shocked
he/she/it had shocked
we had shocked
you had shocked
they had shocked
Future
I will shock
you will shock
he/she/it will shock
we will shock
you will shock
they will shock
Future Perfect
I will have shocked
you will have shocked
he/she/it will have shocked
we will have shocked
you will have shocked
they will have shocked
Future Continuous
I will be shocking
you will be shocking
he/she/it will be shocking
we will be shocking
you will be shocking
they will be shocking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been shocking
you have been shocking
he/she/it has been shocking
we have been shocking
you have been shocking
they have been shocking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been shocking
you will have been shocking
he/she/it will have been shocking
we will have been shocking
you will have been shocking
they will have been shocking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been shocking
you had been shocking
he/she/it had been shocking
we had been shocking
you had been shocking
they had been shocking
Conditional
I would shock
you would shock
he/she/it would shock
we would shock
you would shock
they would shock
Past Conditional
I would have shocked
you would have shocked
he/she/it would have shocked
we would have shocked
you would have shocked
they would have shocked

shock

The effect of lack of blood following an injury, including sudden lowering of blood pressure.

Shock

A number of bundles or armloads of stalks of grain such as wheat, oats, corn, or sorghum, set together vertically with the cut ends down. Such an arrangement allowed the stalks to dry and cure and kept the leaves pointed down to shed rain. Also, the act of making a shock.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shock - the feeling of distress and disbelief that you have when something bad happens accidentallyshock - the feeling of distress and disbelief that you have when something bad happens accidentally; "his mother's death left him in a daze"; "he was numb with shock"
stupefaction - a feeling of stupefied astonishment
2.shock - the violent interaction of individuals or groups entering into combat; "the armies met in the shock of battle"
fighting, combat, fight, scrap - the act of fighting; any contest or struggle; "a fight broke out at the hockey game"; "there was fighting in the streets"; "the unhappy couple got into a terrible scrap"
3.shock - a reflex response to the passage of electric current through the bodyshock - a reflex response to the passage of electric current through the body; "subjects received a small electric shock when they made the wrong response"; "electricians get accustomed to occasional shocks"
4.shock - (pathology) bodily collapse or near collapse caused by inadequate oxygen delivery to the cells; characterized by reduced cardiac output and rapid heartbeat and circulatory insufficiency and pallor; "loss of blood is an important cause of shock"
pathology - the branch of medical science that studies the causes and nature and effects of diseases
collapse, prostration - an abrupt failure of function or complete physical exhaustion; "the commander's prostration demoralized his men"
cardiogenic shock - shock caused by cardiac arrest
hypovolemic shock - shock caused by severe blood or fluid loss
obstructive shock - shock caused by obstruction of blood flow
distributive shock - shock caused by poor distribution of the blood flow
insulin reaction, insulin shock - hypoglycemia produced by excessive insulin in the system causing coma
5.shock - an instance of agitation of the earth's crust; "the first shock of the earthquake came shortly after noon while workers were at lunch"
earthquake, quake, seism, temblor - shaking and vibration at the surface of the earth resulting from underground movement along a fault plane of from volcanic activity
6.shock - an unpleasant or disappointing surprise; "it came as a shock to learn that he was injured"
surprise - a sudden unexpected event
blip - a sudden minor shock or meaningless interruption; "the market had one bad blip today"; "you can't react to the day-to-day blips"; "renewed jitters in the wake of a blip in retail sales"
7.shock - a pile of sheaves of grain set on end in a field to dry; stalks of Indian corn set up in a field; "corn is bound in small sheaves and several sheaves are set up together in shocks"; "whole fields of wheat in shock"
cumulation, heap, pile, agglomerate, cumulus, mound - a collection of objects laid on top of each other
8.shock - a bushy thick mass (especially hair); "he had an unruly shock of black hair"
mass - an ill-structured collection of similar things (objects or people)
9.shock - a sudden jarring impactshock - a sudden jarring impact; "the door closed with a jolt"; "all the jars and jolts were smoothed out by the shock absorbers"
blow, bump - an impact (as from a collision); "the bump threw him off the bicycle"
10.shock - a mechanical dampershock - a mechanical damper; absorbs energy of sudden impulses; "the old car needed a new set of shocks"
air spring, air cushion - a mechanical device using confined air to absorb the shock of motion
damper, muffler - a device that decreases the amplitude of electronic, mechanical, acoustical, or aerodynamic oscillations
suspension system, suspension - a mechanical system of springs or shock absorbers connecting the wheels and axles to the chassis of a wheeled vehicle
Verb1.shock - surprise greatlyshock - surprise greatly; knock someone's socks off; "I was floored when I heard that I was promoted"
surprise - cause to be surprised; "The news really surprised me"
galvanise, galvanize, startle - to stimulate to action ; "..startled him awake"; "galvanized into action"
2.shock - strike with disgust or revulsionshock - strike with disgust or revulsion; "The scandalous behavior of this married woman shocked her friends"
churn up, sicken, disgust, nauseate, revolt - cause aversion in; offend the moral sense of; "The pornographic pictures sickened us"
3.shock - strike with horror or terror; "The news of the bombing shocked her"
alarm, horrify, appal, appall, dismay - fill with apprehension or alarm; cause to be unpleasantly surprised; "I was horrified at the thought of being late for my interview"; "The news of the executions horrified us"
4.shock - collide violently
clash, collide - crash together with violent impact; "The cars collided"; "Two meteors clashed"
5.shock - collect or gather into shocks; "shock grain"
gather, pull together, collect, garner - assemble or get together; "gather some stones"; "pull your thoughts together"
6.shock - subject to electrical shocks
care for, treat - provide treatment for; "The doctor treated my broken leg"; "The nurses cared for the bomb victims"; "The patient must be treated right away or she will die"; "Treat the infection with antibiotics"
galvanise, galvanize - stimulate (muscles) by administering a shock
7.shock - inflict a trauma upon
injure, wound - cause injuries or bodily harm to

shock

noun
1. upset, blow, trauma, bombshell, turn (informal), distress, disturbance, consternation, whammy (informal, chiefly U.S.), state of shock, rude awakening, bolt from the blue, prostration The extent of the violence came as a shock.
2. trauma, collapse, breakdown, daze, stupor, stupefaction He was found beaten and in shock.
3. impact, blow, jolt, clash, encounter, bump, jarring, collision, jerk Steel barriers can bend and absorb the shock.
4. start, scare, fright, turn, jolt It gave me quite a shock to see his face on the screen.
5. mass, head, mop, tangle, cascade, thatch, mane a very old priest with a shock of white hair
verb
1. shake, stun, stagger, jar, shake up (informal), paralyse, numb, jolt, stupefy, shake out of your complacency Relief workers were shocked by what they saw.
2. horrify, appal, disgust, outrage, offend, revolt, unsettle, sicken, agitate, disquiet, nauseate, raise someone's eyebrows, scandalize, gross out (U.S. slang), traumatize, give (someone) a turn (informal) They were easily shocked in those days.
Related words
fear hormephobia

shock 1

noun
1. Violent forcible contact between two or more things:
2. Something that jars the mind or emotions:
Psychiatry: trauma.
verb
1. To deprive of courage or the power to act as a result of fear, anxiety, or disgust:
2. To affect with a strong feeling of moral aversion:
3. To inflict physical or mental injury or distress on:
4. To cause to experience a sudden momentary shock:

shock 2

noun
A group of things gathered haphazardly:
Translations
صَدْمَةصَدْمَه جَسَديَّه او نَفْسِيَّهصَدْمَه عَصَبِيَّهصَدْمَه كَهْرُبائِيّهكُتْلَة من الشَّعْر
šokšokovatchomáče vlasůotřástotřes
chokchokeremankestød
iskujärkyttää
šokšokirati
áfallfá á, setja úr jafnvægi, hryllahármakkihögg, kippurlost
衝撃衝撃を与える
충격충격을 주다
cekulsgrūdienspārdzīvojumssatriektšausmināt
chumáč vlasovšok
pretrespretrestisunekudarec
chockchocka
ความตกใจทำให้ตกใจ
şokşok geçirmekşoke etmek/olmaktravmacereyan çarpması
cú sốcgây sốc

shock

1 [ʃɒk]
A. N
1. (emotional) → conmoción f, golpe m, impresión f; (= start) → susto m
the shock killed himla impresión le mató
the shock was too much for himla impresión fue demasiado para él
to come as a shockresultar sorprendente or asombroso, causar estupefacción
it comes as a shock to hear thatresulta sorprendente or asombroso saber que ..., causa estupefacción saber que ...
frankly, this has all come as a bit of a shockcon toda franqueza, para mí esto ha sido un duro golpe
to get a shockllevarse or pegarse un susto
to give sb a shockdar un susto a algn
what a shock you gave me!¡qué susto me diste!, ¡me has asustado!
pale with shocklívido del susto
2. (lit) (= impact) → sacudida f (fig) (= shakeup) → choque m, sacudida f
the shock of the explosion was felt five miles awayla sacudida de la explosión se sintió a una distancia de cinco millas
shock resistantantichoque
it was a shock to the establishmentsacudió el sistema, fue un serio golpe para el sistema
3. (Elec) → descarga f
she got a shock from the refrigeratorla nevera le dio una descarga or un calambre
4. (Med) → shock m, postración f nerviosa
to be suffering from shock, be in (a state of) shockestar en estado de shock, padecer una postración nerviosa
5. shocks (Aut) (also shock absorbers) → amortiguadores mpl
B. VT
1. (= startle) → sobresaltar, asustar
to shock sb into doing sthdar una sacudida a algn para animarle a hacer algo
2. (= affect emotionally, upset) → conmover, chocar; (= offend) → escandalizar
it shocks me that people are so narrow-mindedme choca que la gente sea tan cerrada
easily shockedque se escandaliza por nada
C. VIcausar escándalo, chocar
this film is not intended to shockesta película no pretende escandalizar a nadie
D. CPD shock absorber N (Aut) → amortiguador m
shock jock N (esp US) presentador(a) polémico/a de coloquios radiofónicos abiertos al público
shock tactics NPL (lit) (Mil) → táctica fsing de choque (fig) → provocación f
to use shock tactics (fig) → recurrir a la provocación, provocar
shock therapy, shock treatment N (Med) (also electric shock treatment) → tratamiento m por electrochoque
shock troops NPLguardias mpl de asalto
shock wave Nonda f de choque

shock

2 [ʃɒk] N (also shock of hair) → mata f de pelo

shock

3 [ʃɒk] (Agr)
A. Ntresnal m, garbera f
B. VTponer en tresnales

shock

[ˈʃɒk]
n
(emotional)choc m
to give sb a shock → faire un choc à qn
It gave us a shock → ça nous a fait un choc.
to get a shock (= be shocked) → avoir un choc
to come as a shock
It came as a shock to hear that → Nous avons appris avec stupeur que ...
(MEDICINE)commotion f, choc m
in shock → en état de choc, commotionné(e)
suffering from shock → en état de choc, commotionné(e)
(= impact) → choc m, heurt m
(ELECTRICITY, ELECTRONICS)secousse f, décharge f
to get a shock (from electrical appliance)recevoir une décharge
an electric shock → une décharge
(US) (= shock absorber) → amortisseur m
[hair] a shock of white hair → une tignasse blanche
vt
(= scandalize) → choquer, scandaliser
I was rather shocked by her attitude → J'ai été assez choqué par son attitude.
(= upset) → bouleverser
They were shocked by the tragedy → Ils ont été bouleversés par la tragédie.shock absorber namortisseur m

shock

:
shock jock
n (esp US inf) Radio-Discjockey, der seine kontroversen (meist rechtsradikalen) Ansichten provokativ vertritt
shockproof
adjstoßfest or -sicher
shock tactics
pl (Mil) → Stoß- or Durchbruchstaktik f; (fig)Schocktherapie f
shock therapy, shock treatment
nSchocktherapie or -behandlung f
shock troops
plStoßtruppen pl
shock value
nSchockwirkung f
shock wave
n (lit)Druckwelle f; (fig)Erschütterung f, → Schock m no pl

shock

1
n
(of explosion, impact)Wucht f; (of earthquake)(Erd)stoß m
(Elec) → Schlag m; (Med) → (Elektro)schock m; to get a shockeinen Schlag bekommen
(= emotional disturbance)Schock m, → Schlag m; (= state)Schock(zustand) m; to suffer from shockeinen Schock (erlitten) haben; to be in (a state of) shockunter Schock stehen; the shock killed himden Schock hat er nicht überlebt; rabbits can die of shockfür ein or bei einem Kaninchen kann ein Schock tödlich sein; a feeling of shock spread through the townEntsetzen ntverbreitete sich in der Stadt; our feeling is one of shockwir sind zutiefst bestürzt; a shock to one’s systemein Kreislaufschock; it comes as a shock to hear that …mit Bestürzung höre ich/hören wir, dass …; to give somebody a shockjdn erschrecken; it gave me a nasty shockes hat mir einen bösen Schreck(en) eingejagt; to get the shock of one’s lifeden Schock seines Lebens kriegen; I got the shock of my life when I heard …ich dachte, mich trifft der Schlag, als ich hörte (inf); he is in for a shock! (inf)der wird sich wundern (inf)
vt (= affect emotionally)erschüttern, bestürzen; (= make indignant)schockieren, schocken (inf); to be shocked by somethingüber etw (acc)erschüttert or bestürzt sein; (morally) → über etw (acc)schockiert or geschockt (inf)sein; she is easily shockedsie ist leicht or schnell schockiert; he was shocked when they took his passport awayes hat ihn geschockt, dass man ihm den Pass abgenommen hat (inf); to shock somebody into doing somethingjdm eine solche Angst einjagen, dass er etw tut; to shock somebody into action/out of his/her etc complacencyjdn zum Handeln/aus seiner Selbstzufriedenheit aufrütteln
vi (film, writer etc)schockieren, schocken (inf)

shock

2
n (Agr) → Garbenbündel nt, → Hocke f

shock

3
n (also shock of hair)(Haar)schopf m

shock

[ʃɒk]
1. n
a. (Elec) (of earthquake) → scossa; (of explosion) → scossone m; (of collision) → urto
to get a shock (Elec) → prendere la scossa
b. (emotional) → shock m inv, colpo
the shock was too much for him → non ha sopportato il colpo or lo shock
it came as a shock to hear that ... → è stato uno shock venire a sapere che...
it may come as a shock to you, but ... → per quanto possa sorprenderti...
to give sb a shock → far venire un colpo a qn
c. (Med) → shock m inv
to be suffering from shock → essere in stato di shock
2. vt (affect emotionally, scandalize) → scioccare
he is easily shocked → si scandalizza facilmente
to shock sb out of his complacency → far perdere a qn un po' della propria boria

shock1

(ʃok) noun
1. a severe emotional disturbance. The news gave us all a shock.
2. (often electric shock) the effect on the body of an electric current. He got a slight shock when he touched the live wire.
3. a sudden blow coming with great force. the shock of an earthquake.
4. a medical condition caused by a severe mental or physical shock. He was suffering from shock after the crash.
verb
to give a shock to; to upset or horrify. Everyone was shocked by his death; The amount of violence shown on television shocks me.
ˈshocker noun
a very unpleasant person or thing. This headache is a real shocker.
ˈshocking adjective
1. causing horror or dismay. shocking news.
2. very bad. a shocking cold.
ˈshockingly adverb
1. very. shockingly expensive.
2. very badly. It was shockingly made.
ˈshock-absorber noun
a device (in a motor car etc) for reducing the effect of bumps.

shock2

(ʃok) noun
a bushy mass (of hair) on a person's head.

shock

صَدْمَة, يَصْدِمُ šok, šokovat chok, chokere Schock, schockieren σοκ, σοκάρω conmocionar, impresión isku, järkyttää choc, choquer šok, šokirati scioccare, shock 衝撃, 衝撃を与える 충격, 충격을 주다 schokken, shock sjokk, sjokkere wstrząs, wstrząsnąć chocar, choque шок, шокировать chock, chocka ความตกใจ, ทำให้ตกใจ şok, şok geçirmek cú sốc, gây sốc 休克, 打击

shock

n., Fr. shock, choque, estado anormal generado por una insuficiencia circulatoria sanguínea que puede causar descenso en la presión arterial, pulso rápido, palidez, temperatura anormalmente baja y debilidad;
anaphylactic ______ anafiláctico;
endotoxic ______ endotóxico;
septic ______ séptico;
___ therapy, electricterapia electroconvulsiva.

shock

n choque m, shock m (Ang); anaphylactic — choque or shock anafiláctico; cardiogenic — choque or shock cardiogénico; electric — descarga eléctrica, choque or shock eléctrico; hypovolemic — choque or shock hipovolémico; neurogenic — choque or shock neurogénico; septic — choque or shock séptico
References in classic literature ?
On Friday last, we were startled by a violent shock in our basement, followed by cries of distress.
The night seemed very long, and it was a most uncomfortable one, because of the shock and exertions through which the party had passed.
In that singular light every little tree and shock of wheat, every sunflower stalk and clump of snow-on-the-mountain, drew itself up high and pointed; the very clods and furrows in the fields seemed to stand up sharply.
Never would Edna Pontellier forget the shock with which she heard Madame Ratignolle relating to old Monsieur Farival the harrowing story of one of her accouchements, withholding no intimate detail.
Cora may submit to the justice of your opinion though she cannot put it in practice," returned the elder sister, who had placed herself by the side of Alice, on a couch of sassafras; "there would be other causes to chase away sleep, though we had been spared the shock of this mysterious noise.
Had Clifford, every time that he emerged out of dreams so lifelike, undergone the torture of transformation from a boy into an old and broken man, the daily recurrence of the shock would have been too much to bear.
What arrested me on the spot-- and with a shock much greater than any vision had allowed for-- was the sense that my imagination had, in a flash, turned real.
Instantly I felt a shock running through all my frame; nothing was to be seen, and nothing was to be heard; but a supernatural hand seemed placed in mine.
He had lighted with such energy upon a thwart of his boat that his ivory leg had received a half-splintering shock.
Quite apart from her own troubles she was boiling over with a general sense of the injustice of it, and she told what she thought of the packers, and what she thought of a world where such things were allowed to happen; and then, while the echoes of the hall rang with the shock of her terrible voice, she sat down again and fanned herself, and the meeting gathered itself together and proceeded to discuss the election of a recording secretary.
Give our respects to 'em," said John; "tell 'em it's no matter how soon they call,--make no kinder difference to us," said John, running his fingers through the shock of hair that thatched his head, and bursting out into a great laugh.
Perkins; "seems like they enjoyed savin' more'n anything in the world, and it's gainin' on Mirandy sence her shock.