shod


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Related to shod: against, attendees

shod

 (shŏd)
v.
Past tense and a past participle of shoe.

shod

(ʃɒd) or

shodden

vb
the past participle of shoe

shoe

(ʃu)

n., pl. shoes, n.
1. an external covering for the human foot, usu. of leather and consisting of a more or less stiff or heavy sole and a lighter upper part ending a short distance above, at, or below the ankle.
2. a horseshoe or a similar plate for the hoof of some other animal.
4. the outer casing of a pneumatic automobile tire.
5. a part having a larger area than the end of an object on which it fits, serving to disperse or apply its weight or thrust.
6. the sliding contact by which an electric car or locomotive takes its current from the third rail.
7. a band of iron on the bottom of the runner of a sleigh.
v.t.
8. to provide with a shoe or shoes.
9. to protect or arm at the point, edge, or face with a ferrule, metal plate, or the like.
Idioms:
in someone's shoes, in the place or situation of another.
[before 900; Old English sceō(h), c. Old Frisian skōch, Old High German scuoh, Old Norse skōr, Gothic skōhs; (v.) Middle English schon, Old English scōg(e)an]
shoe′less, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.shod - wearing footgear
unshoed, unshod - not shod
2.shod - used of certain religious orders who wear shoes
Translations
ذو حِدْوَة
obutý
allajalkakengitettykenkärengas
megpatkolt
skóaîur
obutý
ayakkabı giymişayakkabılı

shod

[ˈʃɒd]
pt
pp of shoe
adj
well-shod → bien chaussé(e)

shoe

(ʃuː) noun
1. an outer covering for the foot. a new pair of shoes.
2. (also ˈhorseshoe) a curved piece of iron nailed to the hoof of a horse.
verbpresent participle ˈshoeing: past tense, past participles shod (ʃod) , shoed
to put a shoe or shoes on (a horse etc).
shod (ʃod) adjective
with a shoe or shoes on.
ˈshoelace , (American) ˈshoestring noun
a kind of string or cord for fastening a shoe.
ˈshoemaker noun
a person who makes, repairs, or sells shoes.
on a shoestring
with or using very little money. He has to live on a shoestring.
References in classic literature ?
There, indeed, just under the corner of the great beam the house rested on, two feet were sticking out, shod in silver shoes with pointed toes.
Of course he may break out now and then(I am not now referring only to drunkenness), and (for example) buy himself a new pair of shoes, and take pleasure in seeing his feet looking well and smartly shod.