shore

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shore 1

 (shôr)
n.
1. The land along the edge of an ocean, sea, lake, or river; a coast.
2. often shores Land; country: far from our native shores.
3. Land as opposed to water: a sailor with an assignment on shore.

[Middle English shore, from Old English scora; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

shore 2

 (shôr)
tr.v. shored, shor·ing, shores
To support by or as if by a prop: shored up the sagging floors; shored up the peace initiative.
n.
A beam or timber propped against a structure to provide support.

[Middle English shoren, from shore, prop, probably from Middle Low German schōre, barrier, or Middle Dutch scōre, prop.]

shore 3

 (shôr)
v. Archaic
A past tense of shear.

shore

(ʃɔː)
n
1. (Physical Geography) the land along the edge of a sea, lake, or wide river.
2. (Physical Geography)
a. land, as opposed to water (esp in the phrase on shore)
b. (as modifier): shore duty.
3. (Law) law the tract of coastland lying between the ordinary marks of high and low water
4. (often plural) a country: his native shores.
vb
(Nautical Terms) (tr) to move or drag (a boat) onto a shore
[C14: probably from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch schōre; compare Old High German scorra cliff; see shear]

shore

(ʃɔː)
n
(Building) a prop, post, or beam used to support a wall, building, ship in dry dock, etc
vb
(often foll by: up) to prop or make safe with or as if with a shore
[C15: from Middle Dutch schōre; related to Old Norse skortha prop]
ˈshoring n

shore

(ʃɔː)
vb
Austral and NZ a past tense of shear

shore1

(ʃɔr, ʃoʊr)

n.
1. the land along the edge of a sea, lake, broad river, etc.
2. some particular country: my native shore.
3. land, as opposed to sea or water: a marine serving on shore.
[before 1000; Middle English schore, Old English scora, c. Middle Dutch, Middle Low German schore]

shore2

(ʃɔr, ʃoʊr)

n., v. shored, shor•ing. n.
1. a supporting post or beam, esp. one propped against the side of a building, a ship in drydock, etc.; prop; strut.
v.t.
2. to support by or as if by a shore or shores; prop (usu. fol. by up).
[1300–50]

beach

shorecoast
1. 'beach'

A beach is an area along the edge of a sea, lake, or wide river that is covered with sand or small stones. You can relax or play on a beach, or use it as a place to swim from.

He walked along the beach.
Children were building sandcastles on the beach.
2. 'shore'

Shore is a more general word for the land along the edge of a sea, lake, or wide river.

He swam towards the shore.
3. 'coast'

The coast is the border between the land and the sea, or the part of a country that is next to the sea.

We stayed in a small village on the west coast of Scotland.
There are industrial cities along the coast.

shore


Past participle: shored
Gerund: shoring

Imperative
shore
shore
Present
I shore
you shore
he/she/it shores
we shore
you shore
they shore
Preterite
I shored
you shored
he/she/it shored
we shored
you shored
they shored
Present Continuous
I am shoring
you are shoring
he/she/it is shoring
we are shoring
you are shoring
they are shoring
Present Perfect
I have shored
you have shored
he/she/it has shored
we have shored
you have shored
they have shored
Past Continuous
I was shoring
you were shoring
he/she/it was shoring
we were shoring
you were shoring
they were shoring
Past Perfect
I had shored
you had shored
he/she/it had shored
we had shored
you had shored
they had shored
Future
I will shore
you will shore
he/she/it will shore
we will shore
you will shore
they will shore
Future Perfect
I will have shored
you will have shored
he/she/it will have shored
we will have shored
you will have shored
they will have shored
Future Continuous
I will be shoring
you will be shoring
he/she/it will be shoring
we will be shoring
you will be shoring
they will be shoring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been shoring
you have been shoring
he/she/it has been shoring
we have been shoring
you have been shoring
they have been shoring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been shoring
you will have been shoring
he/she/it will have been shoring
we will have been shoring
you will have been shoring
they will have been shoring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been shoring
you had been shoring
he/she/it had been shoring
we had been shoring
you had been shoring
they had been shoring
Conditional
I would shore
you would shore
he/she/it would shore
we would shore
you would shore
they would shore
Past Conditional
I would have shored
you would have shored
he/she/it would have shored
we would have shored
you would have shored
they would have shored
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shore - the land along the edge of a body of watershore - the land along the edge of a body of water
beach - an area of sand sloping down to the water of a sea or lake
geological formation, formation - (geology) the geological features of the earth
lake - a body of (usually fresh) water surrounded by land
lakeshore, lakeside - the shore of a lake
ocean - a large body of water constituting a principal part of the hydrosphere
river - a large natural stream of water (larger than a creek); "the river was navigable for 50 miles"
coast, seacoast, sea-coast, seashore - the shore of a sea or ocean
shoreline - a boundary line between land and water
strand - a poetic term for a shore (as the area periodically covered and uncovered by the tides)
2.shore - a beam or timber that is propped against a structure to provide supportshore - a beam or timber that is propped against a structure to provide support
beam - long thick piece of wood or metal or concrete, etc., used in construction
Verb1.shore - serve as a shore to; "The river was shored by trees"
border, bound - form the boundary of; be contiguous to
2.shore - arrive on shore; "The ship landed in Pearl Harbor"
arrive, come, get - reach a destination; arrive by movement or progress; "She arrived home at 7 o'clock"; "She didn't get to Chicago until after midnight"
3.shore - support by placing against something solid or rigid; "shore and buttress an old building"
hold up, support, sustain, hold - be the physical support of; carry the weight of; "The beam holds up the roof"; "He supported me with one hand while I balanced on the beam"; "What's holding that mirror?"
bolster - prop up with a pillow or bolster

shore

noun beach, coast, sands, strand (poetic), lakeside, waterside, seaboard (chiefly U.S.), foreshore, seashore He made it to the shore after leaving the boat.
Related words
adjective littoral

shore

noun
A means or device that keeps something erect, stable, or secure:
Translations
سَاحِلشاطئ، ضِفَّه
břehpobřeží
kystbred
bordo
ranta
obala
part
strönd; land
바닷가
oraripa
krantas
krasts
malţărm
obala
kuststrand
ชายฝั่ง
bờ

shore

2 [ʃɔːʳ]
A. VT to shore up (lit) → apuntalar (fig) → apoyar, reforzar, sostener
B. N (= prop) → puntal m

shore

[ˈʃɔːr]
n
(= coast) [sea, lake] → rivage m, rive f
(= dry land) → terre f
on shore → à terre
shores npl (= country) our shores → notre pays m
shore up
vt sep
[+ building, tunnel, structure] → étayer
[+ economy] → consolidershore leave npermission f à terre

shore

:
shore area
nUferzone f, → Uferregion f
shore dinner
n (US) → Meeresfrüchte pl
shore leave
n (Naut) → Landurlaub m
shoreline
nWasserlinie f, → Uferlinie f
shore pass
n (Naut) → Landurlaubsschein m
shore patrol
n (US) → Küstenstreife f, → Küstenpatrouille f (der US-Marine)
shoreward(s)
adj shore windSeewind m; in a shore directionin Richtung Küste or Land, landwärts
advlandwärts, zum Land (hin)

shore

1
n
(= seashore, lake shore)Ufer nt, → Gestade nt (liter); (= beach)Strand m; these shores (fig)dieses Land, diese Gestade pl (liter); he returned to his native shoreser kehrte zurück zu heimatlichen Gefilden; a house on the shores of the lakeein Haus am Seeufer; no invader has since set foot on these shoresseitdem hat kein Eroberer mehr diesen Boden betreten
(= land)Land nt; on shorean Land

shore

2
n (Min, Naut) → Stützbalken m, → Strebe f
vt (also shore up)(ab)stützen; (fig)stützen

shore

[ʃɔːʳ] vt to shore up (tunnel, wall) → puntellare (fig) → consolidare; (prices) → mantenere

shore

1 [ʃɔːʳ] n (of sea) → riva; (of lake) → sponda, riva; (beach) → spiaggia; (coast) → costa
on shore → a terra
to go on shore → sbarcare
the ship hugged the shore → la nave navigava sotto costa

shore

(ʃoː) noun
land bordering on the sea or on any large area of water. a walk along the shore; When the ship reached Gibraltar the passengers were allowed on shore.

shore

سَاحِل břeh kyst Küste όχθη orilla ranta rivage obala riva 바닷가 kust kyst brzeg costa берег kust ชายฝั่ง kıyı bờ
References in classic literature ?
Da Souza and Trent took their places side by side on the broad, flat-bottomed boat, and soon they were off shorewards and the familiar song of the Kru boys as they bent over their oars greeted their ears.
I saw people struggling shorewards, and heard their screaming and shouting faintly above the seething and roar of the Martian's collapse.
Once more, Sir Oliver," said Sir Nigel, looking shorewards with sparkling eyes, "do we find ourselves at the gate of honor, the door which hath so often led us to all that is knightly and worthy.
By this simple accident, he reflected, as, helping the good work along with an occasional surreptitious leg-stroke, he was towed shorewards, there had been formed an acquaintanceship, if nothing more, which could not lightly be broken.
This was the battle--to win seaward against the Creep of the shoreward hastening sea.
Paddling, wheezing, resting, oblivious of the shadow-world of the white men, knowing only the reality of Tulagi Mountain cutting its crest-line blackly across the dim radiance of the star-sprinkled sky, the reality of the sea and of the canoe he so feebly urged across it, and the reality of his fading strength and of the death into which he would surely end, the ancient black man slowly made his shoreward way.
As a measure of economy, however, I put some of the heavier baggage on the shoreward parts, to go as slow freight.
Then I skirted among the woods until I had regained the rear, or shoreward side, of the stockade, and was soon warmly welcomed by the faithful party.
This he saw, and an eighth man who crouched in the bow and gazed shoreward.