shover


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shove

 (shŭv)
v. shoved, shov·ing, shoves
v.tr.
1. To push quickly, forcefully, or roughly: shoved the chair against the wall. See Synonyms at push.
2. To put (something) roughly in a place: shoved the keys into his pocket.
v.intr.
1. To push someone or something with force.
2. To move forward roughly, often by shoving someone: shoved past the security guard into his seat.
n.
The act of shoving; a push.
Phrasal Verb:
shove off
1. To push (a boat) away from shore in leaving.
2. Informal To leave.

[Middle English shoven, from Old English scūfan.]

shov′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shover - someone who pushes
mover - someone who moves
nudger - someone who nudges; someone who gives a gentle push; "he needs a regular nudger to keep him awake"
References in periodicals archive ?
Frontier Communications Corporation (Nasdaq:FTR) announced on Thursday that it has appointed Dale Shover as vice president-Business Operations/Finance for the South Region, covering Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and Nevada.
The Gormans and Shover teamed up with Marcus & Millichap's Mark Taylor, a first vice president investments, and Dean Zang, a vice president investments, to represent the buyer, H&R REIT of Canada.
51) Neal Shover and Aaron S Routhe, "Environmental Crime' (2005) 32 Crime and Justice: A Review of Research 321.
See Almeling, supra note 23, at 29 (observing that agency staff will coach or disqualify egg donors who do not report altruistic motivations but do not do the same for sperm donors); Shover et.
Martin-Johnson - Blanche Shover Martin-Johnson, 85, of Springfield, died Sept.
As veteran pie-hole shover Ed ``Cookie'' Jarvis tells Fagone: ``Let's face it.
Trust spokeswoman Lisa Shover, said Nina's (which rhymes with mynah's) impact on the industry was felt when the Pulliam newspapers--Central Newspapers, Inc.
Shover, Neal and Andy Hochstetler, Choosing White-Collar Crime.
Durante los ultimos diez anos se ha producido una avalancha de trabajos (Harries, 1995; Harries y Cheatwood, 1997; Galliher y Galliher, 1997; Hochstetler y Shover, 1997 y Peck, 2003) que ha servido para relanzar el tema como un foco de atencion desde la geografia.
There has been much theorizing and research about why people commit crime but much less study of why people who have committed criminal acts choose to desist from crime (Laub & Sampson, 2001; Shover & Thompson, 1992).
A significant increase in competitive individualism, instrumentalism, and present-time orientation have accompanied the virtual abandonment of deferred gratification and the hedonistic attractions of "street culture" (see Shover and Honaker, 1991 ; Jacobs et al.
A variety of medications and other pharmacological agents can also impact on sexual interest or activity (Segraves, 1988; 1998; for a review, see Shover, 2000).