show off


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show

 (shō)
v. showed, shown (shōn) or showed, show·ing, shows
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause or allow to be seen; display: showed us his tattoo.
b. To display for sale, in exhibition, or in competition: showed her most recent paintings.
c. To permit access to (a house, for example) when offering for sale or rent.
2. To conduct; guide: showed them to the table.
3. To direct one's attention to; point out: showed them the city's historical sites.
4.
a. To make evident or reveal (an emotion or condition, for example): showed displeasure at his remark; a carpet that shows wear.
b. To reveal (oneself) as in one's behavior or condition: The old boat showed itself to be seaworthy.
c. To indicate; register: The altimeter showed that the plane was descending.
5.
a. To demonstrate by reasoning or procedure: showed that the hypothesis was wrong; a film that showed how to tune a piano.
b. To demonstrate to by reasoning or procedure; inform or prove to: showed him how to fix the camera; showed her that it could really happen.
6. To grant; bestow: showed no mercy to the traitors.
v.intr.
1. To be or become visible or evident: Concern showed in his face.
2. Slang To make an appearance; show up: didn't show for her appointment.
3.
a. To be exhibited publicly: What's showing at the movie theater tonight?
b. To give a performance or present an exhibition: Which artist is showing in the gallery?
4. Sports To finish third or better in a horserace or dog race.
n.
1. A display; a manifestation: made a show of strength.
2.
a. A trace or indication, as of oil in a well.
b. The discharge of bloody mucus from the vagina indicating the start of labor.
c. The first discharge of blood in menstruation.
3. A false appearance; a pretense: only a show of kindness.
4.
a. A striking appearance or display; a spectacle.
b. A pompous or ostentatious display.
5. Display or outward appearance: This antique tea service is just for show. His smile was for show.
6.
a. A public exhibition or entertainment.
b. An exposition for the display or demonstration of commercial products: an auto show.
c. A usually competitive exhibition of domestic animals: won first place at the cat show.
7.
a. A radio or television program.
b. A movie.
c. A theatrical troupe or company.
8. Informal An affair or undertaking: ran the whole show.
9. Sports Third place at the finish, as in a horserace.
Phrasal Verbs:
show off
To display or behave in an ostentatious or conspicuous way.
show up
1. To be clearly visible.
2. To put in an appearance; arrive: Don't show up late.
3. To expose or reveal the true character or nature of: showed their efforts up as a waste of time.
4. Informal To surpass, as in ability or intelligence: She shows up all the others in the chorus.
Idioms:
get the show on the road Slang
To get started.
show (one's) hand
1. Games To display one's cards with faces up.
2. To state one's intentions or reveal one's resources, especially when previously hidden.
show (one's) heels
To depart from quickly; flee.
show (someone) a good time
To occupy (someone) with amusing things; entertain.

[Middle English sheuen, shouen, from Old English scēawian, to look at, display.]
Synonyms: show, display, expose, parade, exhibit, flaunt
These verbs mean to present something to view. Show is the most general: "She hated to show her feelings" (John Galsworthy).
Display often suggests an attempt to present something to best advantage: The dealer spread the rug out to display the pattern. Expose usually involves uncovering something or bringing it out from concealment: The excavation exposed a staggering number of artifacts. The term can often imply revelation of something better left concealed: Your comment exposes your insensitivity. Parade usually suggests a pretentious or boastful presentation: "He early discovered that, by parading his unhappiness before the multitude, he produced an immense sensation" (Thomas Macaulay).
Exhibit implies open presentation that invites inspection: The museum is exhibiting paintings by local artists. Flaunt implies an unabashed, prideful, often arrogant display: "Every great hostelry flaunted the flag of some foreign potentate" (John Dos Passos). See Also Synonyms at appear.

show off

vb (adverb)
1. (tr) to exhibit or display so as to invite admiration
2. (intr) informal to behave in such a manner as to make an impression
n
informal a person who makes a vain display of himself
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.show off - display proudly; act ostentatiously or pretentiously; "he showed off his new sports car"
display, exhibit, expose - to show, make visible or apparent; "The Metropolitan Museum is exhibiting Goya's works this month"; "Why don't you show your nice legs and wear shorter skirts?"; "National leaders will have to display the highest skills of statesmanship"
flex - exhibit the strength of; "The victorious army flexes its invincibility"
splurge - be showy or ostentatious

show

verb
1. To make visible; bring to view:
Archaic: discover.
Idioms: bring to light, lay open, make plain.
2. To come into view:
Idioms: make an appearance, meet the eye.
3. To present a lifelike image of:
4. To make a public and usually ostentatious show of.Also used with off:
5. To show the way to:
6. To make known or identify, as by signs:
7. To make manifest or apparent:
8. To give a precise indication of, as on a register or scale:
9. To be performed:
phrasal verb
show up
To come to a particular place:
Slang: blow in.
noun
1. An act of showing or displaying:
3. A display of insincere behavior:
4. An impressive or ostentatious exhibition:
5. A large public display, as of goods or works of art:
Translations
يَعْرِض للتَّفاخُر والتَّباهييَفْتَخِرُ
předvádět sepředvéstvychloubat se
prale
leveillä
razmetati se
monta sig afsÿna/monta sig
見せびらかす
과시하다
vystatovať sa
skryta
ทำตัวเด่น
gösteriş yapmakhava atmakgösterip fiyaka yapmak
khoe khoang

w>show off

viangeben (→ to, in front of vor +dat)
vt sep
(= flaunt) knowledge, medalangeben mit; new car, sonvorführen (to sb jdm); wealthprotzen mit (inf)
(= enhance) beauty, picturehervorheben; figurebetonen; to show something off to its best advantageetw (richtig) zur Geltung bringen; the dress shows her off to great advantagedas Kleid ist sehr vorteilhaft für sie

show

(ʃəu) past tense showed: past participles showed ~shown verb
1. to allow or cause to be seen. Show me your new dress; Please show your membership card when you come to the club; His work is showing signs of improvement.
2. to be able to be seen. The tear in your dress hardly shows; a faint light showing through the curtains.
3. to offer or display, or to be offered or displayed, for the public to look at. Which picture is showing at the cinema?; They are showing a new film; His paintings are being shown at the art gallery.
4. to point out or point to. He showed me the road to take; Show me the man you saw yesterday.
5. (often with (a)round) to guide or conduct. Please show this lady to the door; They showed him (a)round (the factory).
6. to demonstrate to. Will you show me how to do it?; He showed me a clever trick.
7. to prove. That just shows / goes to show how stupid he is.
8. to give or offer (someone) kindness etc. He showed him no mercy.
noun
1. an entertainment, public exhibition, performance etc. a horse-show; a flower show; the new show at the theatre; a TV show.
2. a display or act of showing. a show of strength.
3. an act of pretending to be, do etc (something). He made a show of working, but he wasn't really concentrating.
4. appearance, impression. They just did it for show, in order to make themselves seem more important than they are.
5. an effort or attempt. He put up a good show in the chess competition.
ˈshowy adjective
giving an impression of value by a bright and striking outward appearance. His clothes are too showy for my liking.
ˈshowiness noun
ˈshow-business noun
the entertainment industry, especially the branch of the theatre concerned with variety shows, comedy etc.
ˈshowcase noun
a glass case for displaying objects in a museum, shop etc.
ˈshowdown noun
an open, decisive quarrel etc ending a period of rivalry etc.
ˈshowground noun
an area where displays etc are held.
ˈshow-jumping noun
a competitive sport in which horses and their riders have to jump a series of artificial fences, walls etc.
ˈshowman noun
a person who owns or manages an entertainment, a stall at a fair etc.
ˈshowroom noun
a room where objects for sale etc are displayed for people to see. a car showroom.
give the show away
to make known a secret, trick etc.
good show!
that's good!.
on show
being displayed in an exhibition, showroom etc. There are over five hundred paintings on show here.
show off
1. to show or display for admiration. He showed off his new car by taking it to work.
2. to try to impress others with one's possessions, ability etc. She is just showing off – she wants everyone to know how well she speaks French (noun ˈshow-off a person who does this).
show up
1. to make obvious. This light shows up the places where I've mended this coat.
2. to reveal the faults of. Mary was so neat that she really showed me up.
3. to stand out clearly. The scratches showed up on the photograph.
4. to appear or arrive. I waited for her, but she never showed up.

show off

يَفْتَخِرُ vychloubat se prale angeben κάνω φιγούρα presumir leveillä exhiber razmetati se ostentare 見せびらかす 과시하다 opscheppen vise seg popisać się exibir-se рисоваться skryta ทำตัวเด่น gösteriş yapmak khoe khoang 炫耀
References in classic literature ?
Steward expected something of him, wanted him to show off.
I wrote it thinking it would sound very witty; but now that I have seen myself that I only wanted to show off in a despicable way--I will not scratch it out on purpose
The robin flew from his swinging spray of ivy on to the top of the wall and he opened his beak and sang a loud, lovely trill, merely to show off.
Oh, yes, we may sit here and look at them, and they may show off to us there to their fill; but even while they pretend to be lost in their fairytale they're steeped in their vision of the dead restored.
He was just enough civilized to show off his outlandishness in the strangest possible manner.
We stood about fifteen and a half hands high; we were therefore just as good for riding as we were for driving, and our master used to say that he disliked either horse or man that could do but one thing; and as he did not want to show off in London parks, he preferred a more active and useful kind of horse.
He did not care about his soldiers, he did not care about the theatre; he only liked to go out walking to show off his new clothes.
She read it so well, that the young gentleman stopped munching to regard her with respectful astonishment, and when she stopped, he said, suspiciously, "You are a sly one, Polly, to study up so you can show off before me.
It's nice to have accomplishments and be elegant, but not to show off or get perked up," said Amy thoughtfully.
At least, therefore, I did not assume the character of needless precipitance merely to show off before the ladies.
Here She-wee-she took a sudden notion to visit his people, and show off the state of worldly prosperity to which he had so suddenly attained.
It was all in French, and Philip knew that she wrote in that language to show off, but he was worried all the same.