shown


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Related to shown: shown off

shown

 (shōn)
v.
A past participle of show.

shown

(ʃəʊn)
vb
a past participle of show

show

(ʃoʊ)

v. showed, shown showed, show•ing, v.t.
1. to cause or allow to be seen; exhibit; display.
2. to present or perform as a public entertainment or spectacle: to show a movie.
3. to indicate; point out: to show the way.
4. to guide; escort: Show her in.
5. to make known; explain: He showed what he meant.
6. to reveal; demonstrate: Your work shows promise.
7. to register; mark: The thermometer showed 10 below zero.
8. to exhibit or offer for sale: to show a house.
9. to allege, as in a legal document: to show cause.
10. to produce, as facts in an affidavit or at a hearing.
11. to offer; grant: to show mercy.
v.i.
12. to be or become visible: Does my slip show?
13. to be manifested in a certain way: to show to advantage.
14. to put on an exhibition or performance: Several designers are showing now.
15. to make an appearance; show up.
16. to finish third, as in a horse race.
17. show off,
a. to display to advantage: The gold frame shows off the picture beautifully.
b. to present for admiration or approval: young parents showing off their new baby.
c. to seek attention by ostentatious or insistent display of one's talent, possessions, achievements, etc.
18. show up,
a. to make known; reveal: It showed up the flaws in the plan.
b. to appear as specified; be seen: White shows up well against the blue.
c. to come to or arrive at a place.
d. to make (another) seem inferior; outdo.
n.
19. a theatrical production, performance, or company.
20. a radio or television program.
21. a motion picture.
22. an exposition of products by various manufacturers in a particular industry.
23. exhibition: a show of Renoirs.
24. ostentatious display: all show and no substance.
25. a display or demonstration: a show of courage.
26. the position of the competitor who comes in third, as in a horse race. Compare place (def. 24b), win (def. 15).
27. appearance; impression: to make a sorry show.
28. a sight or spectacle.
29.
a. the first appearance of blood at the onset of menstruation.
b. a blood-tinged mucous discharge from the vagina that indicates the onset of labor.
[before 900; Middle English showen, s(c)hewen to look at, show, Old English scēawian to look at]

shown

etc see show
Translations

shown

[ˈʃəʊn] pp of showshow-off [ˈʃəʊɒf] n (pejorative)frimeur/euse m/fshow of hands nvote m à main levée
to ask for a show of hands → demander que l'on vote à main levée
References in classic literature ?
After he had shown us his garden, Peter trundled a load of watermelons up the hill in his wheelbarrow.
And yet here are horses that always journey in this manner, as my own eyes have seen, and as their trail has shown for twenty long miles.
When you drink you are a menace to yourself--and, as is shown by this crime, to the community.
Had they shown the least consciousness of their finery, or of its absurdity, they would have seemed despicable.
But there was a story, for which it is difficult to conceive any foundation, that the posterity of Matthew Maule had some connection with the mystery of the looking-glass, and that, by what appears to have been a sort of mesmeric process, they could make its inner region all alive with the departed Pyncheons; not as they had shown themselves to the world, nor in their better and happier hours, but as doing over again some deed of sin, or in the crisis of life's bitterest sorrow.
A trait of native elegance, seldom seen in the masculine character after childhood or early youth, was shown in the General's fondness for the sight and fragrance of flowers.
Not so dreadful as what I do," I replied; on which I must have shown her--as I was indeed but too conscious--a front of miserable defeat.
And how pleasing to God was this conduct in Jonah, is shown in the eventual deliverance of him from the sea and the whale.
The visitors were taken there and shown them, all neatly hung in rows, labeled conspicuously with the tags of the government inspectors--and some, which had been killed by a special process, marked with the sign of the kosher rabbi, certifying that it was fit for sale to the orthodox.
Lots of new capabilities are shown for on-line quality checks.
In the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, legendary cartoonists Tex Avery and Chuck Jones, working in the Warner Brothers back lot, developed the popular wacky cartoon shorts that were shown in movie theaters before feature films.
The European outbreak has shown us the need for heightened domestic biosecurity measures.