shown


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Related to shown: shown off

shown

 (shōn)
v.
A past participle of show.

shown

(ʃəʊn)
vb
a past participle of show

show

(ʃoʊ)

v. showed, shown showed, show•ing, v.t.
1. to cause or allow to be seen; exhibit; display.
2. to present or perform as a public entertainment or spectacle: to show a movie.
3. to indicate; point out: to show the way.
4. to guide; escort: Show her in.
5. to make known; explain: He showed what he meant.
6. to reveal; demonstrate: Your work shows promise.
7. to register; mark: The thermometer showed 10 below zero.
8. to exhibit or offer for sale: to show a house.
9. to allege, as in a legal document: to show cause.
10. to produce, as facts in an affidavit or at a hearing.
11. to offer; grant: to show mercy.
v.i.
12. to be or become visible: Does my slip show?
13. to be manifested in a certain way: to show to advantage.
14. to put on an exhibition or performance: Several designers are showing now.
15. to make an appearance; show up.
16. to finish third, as in a horse race.
17. show off,
a. to display to advantage: The gold frame shows off the picture beautifully.
b. to present for admiration or approval: young parents showing off their new baby.
c. to seek attention by ostentatious or insistent display of one's talent, possessions, achievements, etc.
18. show up,
a. to make known; reveal: It showed up the flaws in the plan.
b. to appear as specified; be seen: White shows up well against the blue.
c. to come to or arrive at a place.
d. to make (another) seem inferior; outdo.
n.
19. a theatrical production, performance, or company.
20. a radio or television program.
21. a motion picture.
22. an exposition of products by various manufacturers in a particular industry.
23. exhibition: a show of Renoirs.
24. ostentatious display: all show and no substance.
25. a display or demonstration: a show of courage.
26. the position of the competitor who comes in third, as in a horse race. Compare place (def. 24b), win (def. 15).
27. appearance; impression: to make a sorry show.
28. a sight or spectacle.
29.
a. the first appearance of blood at the onset of menstruation.
b. a blood-tinged mucous discharge from the vagina that indicates the onset of labor.
[before 900; Middle English showen, s(c)hewen to look at, show, Old English scēawian to look at]

shown

etc see show
Translations

shown

[ˈʃəʊn] pp of showshow-off [ˈʃəʊɒf] n (pejorative)frimeur/euse m/fshow of hands nvote m à main levée
to ask for a show of hands → demander que l'on vote à main levée
References in classic literature ?
There is fairly definite evidence to warrant our acceptance of this: the dialect of the "Works and Days" is shown by Rzach (3) to contain distinct Aeolisms apart from those which formed part of the general stock of epic poetry.
If we suppose any habitual action to become inherited--and I think it can be shown that this does sometimes happen--then the resemblance between what originally was a habit and an instinct becomes so close as not to be distinguished.
Under changed conditions of life, it is at least possible that slight modifications of instinct might be profitable to a species; and if it can be shown that instincts do vary ever so little, then I can see no difficulty in natural selection preserving and continually accumulating variations of instinct to any extent that may be profitable.
And such instances of diversity of instinct in the same species can be shown to occur in nature.
And that there may be less difficulty in understanding what I am about to say on this subject, I advise those who are not versed in anatomy, before they commence the perusal of these observations, to take the trouble of getting dissected in their presence the heart of some large animal possessed of lungs (for this is throughout sufficiently like the human), and to have shown to them its two ventricles or cavities: in the first place, that in the right side, with which correspond two very ample tubes, viz.
I had after this described the reasonable soul, and shown that it could by no means be educed from the power of matter, as the other things of which I had spoken, but that it must be expressly created; and that it is not sufficient that it be lodged in the human body exactly like a pilot in a ship, unless perhaps to move its members, but that it is necessary for it to be joined and united more closely to the body, in order to have sensations and appetites similar to ours, and thus constitute a real man.
I was that day shown to twelve sets of company, and as often forced to act over again the same fopperies, till I was half dead with weariness and vexation; for those who had seen me made such wonderful reports, that the people were ready to break down the doors to come in.
We were ten weeks in our journey, and I was shown in eighteen large towns, besides many villages, and private families.
He has marched us through miles of pictures and sculpture in the vast corridors of the Vatican; and through miles of pictures and sculpture in twenty other palaces; he has shown us the great picture in the Sistine Chapel, and frescoes enough to frescoe the heavens--pretty much all done by Michael Angelo.
The idea that at the first moment of receiving the news of his son's intentions had occurred to him in jest- that if Andrew got married he himself would marry Bourienne- had evidently pleased him, and latterly he had persistently, and as it seemed to Princess Mary merely to offend her, shown special endearments to the companion and expressed his dissatisfaction with his daughter by demonstrations of love of Bourienne.
Maud wondered, but looking at Voyt, "They're shown often, no doubt, as paying for their badness.
Yet there is a legend in the land that once, many generations gone, a white man crossed the mountains, and was led by a woman to the secret chamber and shown the wealth hidden in it.