shtick


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

shtick

also schtick or shtik  (shtĭk)
n. Slang
1. A characteristic attribute, talent, or trait that is helpful in securing recognition or attention: waiters in tropical attire are part of the restaurant's shtick.
2. An entertainment routine or gimmick.

[Yiddish shtik, piece, routine, from Middle High German stücke, piece, from Old High German stukki, crust, fragment.]

shtick

(ʃtɪk) ,

schtick

or

shtik

n
(Theatre) slang a comedian's routine; act; piece
[C20: from Yiddish shtik piece, from Middle High German stücke]

shtick

or shtik

(ʃtɪk)

n. Slang.
1. a show-business routine or piece of business inserted to gain a laugh or draw attention to oneself.
2. one's special interest, talent, etc.
[1955–60; < Yiddish shtik pranks, whims, literally, piece < Middle High German stücke, Old High German stucki (German Stück); compare stucco]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shtick - (Yiddish) a little; a piece; "give him a shtik cake"; "he's a shtik crazy"; "he played a shtik Beethoven"
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
small indefinite amount, small indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is below average size or magnitude
schtickl, schtikl, shtickl, shtikl - a really little shtik; "have a shtikl cake"
2.shtick - (Yiddish) a contrived and often used bit of business that a performer uses to steal attention; "play it straight with no shtik"
byplay, stage business, business - incidental activity performed by an actor for dramatic effect; "his business with the cane was hilarious"
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
3.shtick - (Yiddish) a prank or piece of clowning; "his shtik made us laugh"
buffoonery, clowning, harlequinade, japery, prank, frivolity - acting like a clown or buffoon
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
4.shtick - (Yiddish) a devious trick; a bit of cheating; "how did you ever fall for a shtik like that?"
fast one, trick - a cunning or deceitful action or device; "he played a trick on me"; "he pulled a fast one and got away with it"
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
References in classic literature ?
Faith, you've larnt the half av your lesson, Sorr,' sez I, 'but av you shtick to the Rig'lations you'll niver get thim inship at all, at all.
It's not for nothing that one of the founding conferences of particle physics was held at the Grossinger Hotel in the Catskills, which had heard generations of vaudeville shtick.
Even Sonny and Cher, it is said, borrowed their famous TV shtick from Smith and Prima.
Because the fact is, no one does this shtick better than Taylor and Bologna.
Coming off best on CD, though, are the Andrew Lloyd Webber parody "The Song That Goes Like This," given bombastic bounce by Sara Ramirez, and the David Hyde Pierce number "You Won't Succeed on Broadway," a post-Producers ode to the Great White Way that feels like a mind meld between Python wit and Mel Brooksian shtick.
And, in chorus with Gingeras, he appreciates in the work of German painter and "performer" Martin Kippenberger a theater of all-too-human affect that, taken together with the trail of art objects he leaves behind him, is both update and antidote to Andy's deadpan shtick.
In many ways, Ventura continues the same bad-boy, outsider shtick that served him well in professional wrestling and talk radio.
Twenty or thirty years ago, he might have made a viable Presidential candidate, but now he is reduced to doing a nightclub comic's shtick, paraphrasing George Wallace's 1968 mantra that "there isn't a dime's worth of difference between the major parties" by saying that "the only difference is the speed with which their knees hit the floor when the corporate contributors come through the door.
Williams and Crystal are a solid comedy duo, with Crystal demonstrating a skill with Glasgow kisses, while Williams give us his usual shtick and umpteen bizarre outfits.
His shtick was teaching tourists to pan for gold by day and playing Lothario for the local belles by night.
Playing Charles Guiteau, the failed evangelist who killed President Garfield, Denis O'Hare lets his usually enjoyable mannerisms slide into shtick, while Alexander Gemignani is poignant as Reagan's assailant John Hinckley.
Now Ali G does the same shtick on HBO, and, oddly enough, in its American incarnation I enjoy it tremendously.