sibylline


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Related to sibylline: Sibylline Books, Sibylline oracles

sib·yl·line

 (sĭb′ə-līn′, -lēn′) also si·byl·ic or si·byl·lic (sĭ-bĭl′ĭk)
adj.
1. Coming from, characteristic of, or relating to a sibyl.
2. Prophetic; oracular.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sibylline - resembling or characteristic of a prophet or prophecysibylline - resembling or characteristic of a prophet or prophecy; "the high priest's divinatory pronouncement"; "mantic powers"; "a kind of sibylline book with ready and infallible answers to questions"
prophetic, prophetical - foretelling events as if by supernatural intervention; "prophetic writings"; "prophetic powers"; "words that proved prophetic"
2.sibylline - having a secret or hidden meaning; "cabalistic symbols engraved in stone"; "cryptic writings"; "thoroughly sibylline in most of his pronouncements"- John Gunther
esoteric - confined to and understandable by only an enlightened inner circle; "a compilation of esoteric philosophical theories"

sibylline

adjective
Of or relating to the foretelling of events by or as if by supernatural means:
Translations
helderziendsibillijns

sibylline

[ˈsɪbɪlaɪn] ADJsibilino

sibylline

adj (lit)sibyllinisch; (fig)prophetisch
References in periodicals archive ?
I have shown, indeed, that a few of "the 68" were not antiuniversalist, and that the uncertain were in fact universalists, for example, Clement of Alexandria, Apocalypse of Peter, Sibylline Oracles (in one passage), Eusebius, Nazianzen, perhaps even Basil and Athanasius, Ambrose, Jerome before his change of mind, and Augustine in his anti-Manichaean years.
In terms of his second purpose, he does an excellent job providing full analyses of the issue of ex eventu prediction in Daniel, 1 Enoch, certain Dead Sea Scrolls (Pseudo-Daniel, 4QJeremiah, the Ezekiel Pseudepigrapha, the Damascus Document, certain Pesharim, 11QMelchizedek), and also the Sibylline Oracles (written by Hellenized Jews, far from Jerusalem).
The Sibylline priestess engaged in divination served as the fitting image of the poetess: precisely as a medium enters a trance in order to translate divine will, the poetess was seen as falling under the spell of poetic inspiration.
Remarkably, this sibylline association is directly evoked in the description of Dupin's demeanour when he exercises his analytic abilities.
Arranging the Sibylline Leaves: James Elliot Cabot's Work as Emerson's Literary Executor.
This sibylline reply with the echo of the great Calderon de la Barca is also clearly beyond the comprehension of Othello, who, in a later scene, overcome by consternation, exclaims, "Ma qual e la verita?
Apocalypse figures in writing in Europe from the third through fifth centuries in the Sibylline Oracles.
That is not to say that Masson's early works, such as Le Reve du prisonnier (The Dream of the reisoner), 1924, solely manifest the automatist methods of the day; quite to the contrary, the painting is sober, self-consciously hieratic, with a sibylline mixture of allegorical figure, disdain for color, and a studious synthetic cubism (a mode the Surrealists were at pains to overthrow for its by-then marked aestheticism and decorative complacency).
Still, some of Jones's Roman poems go beyond a vague Sibylline intuition and suggest a more pronounced natural orientation to the
Whereas the text of Genesis makes no reference to his preaching, early Jewish and Christian sources commonly portray Noah as preaching repentance, as in the Sibylline Oracles 1.
Referring to the sovereign debt crisis in Europe, Poland's Minister of Finance, Jacek Rostowski, said that the negotiations reminded him of the story of the purchase of the Sibylline Books in ancient Rome.
Part one treats the Parables of Enoch (I Enoch 37-71), 2 Enoch, The Sibylline Oracles, and literature from Jeremiah, Baruch, 4 Ezra, 2 Baruch, and the testaments of Abraham, Moses, Job, and Solomon.