sibylline


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sib·yl·line

 (sĭb′ə-līn′, -lēn′) also si·byl·ic or si·byl·lic (sĭ-bĭl′ĭk)
adj.
1. Coming from, characteristic of, or relating to a sibyl.
2. Prophetic; oracular.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sibylline - resembling or characteristic of a prophet or prophecysibylline - resembling or characteristic of a prophet or prophecy; "the high priest's divinatory pronouncement"; "mantic powers"; "a kind of sibylline book with ready and infallible answers to questions"
prophetic, prophetical - foretelling events as if by supernatural intervention; "prophetic writings"; "prophetic powers"; "words that proved prophetic"
2.sibylline - having a secret or hidden meaning; "cabalistic symbols engraved in stone"; "cryptic writings"; "thoroughly sibylline in most of his pronouncements"- John Gunther
esoteric - confined to and understandable by only an enlightened inner circle; "a compilation of esoteric philosophical theories"

sibylline

adjective
Of or relating to the foretelling of events by or as if by supernatural means:
Translations

sibylline

[ˈsɪbɪlaɪn] ADJsibilino

sibylline

adj (lit)sibyllinisch; (fig)prophetisch
References in periodicals archive ?
The Sibylline priestess engaged in divination served as the fitting image of the poetess: precisely as a medium enters a trance in order to translate divine will, the poetess was seen as falling under the spell of poetic inspiration.
John probably knew the Sibylline Oracles and the Book of Jubilees, both of which were very influential in late antiquity.
This sibylline reply with the echo of the great Calderon de la Barca is also clearly beyond the comprehension of Othello, who, in a later scene, overcome by consternation, exclaims, "Ma qual e la verita?