sic

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sic 1

 (sĭk, sēk)
adv.
Thus; so. Used to indicate that a quoted passage, especially one containing an error or unconventional spelling, has been retained in its original form or written intentionally.

[Latin sīc; see so- in Indo-European roots.]

sic 2

also sick  (sĭk)
tr.v. sicced, sic·cing, sics also sicked or sick·ing or sicks
1. To set upon; attack.
2. To urge or incite to hostile action; set: sicced the dogs on the intruders.

[Dialectal variant of seek.]

sic

(sɪk)
adv
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) so or thus: inserted in brackets in a written or printed text to indicate that an odd or questionable reading is what was actually written or printed
[Latin]

sic

(sɪk)
vb (tr) , sics, sicking or sicked
1. to turn on or attack: used only in commands, as to a dog
2. to urge (a dog) to attack
[C19: dialect variant of seek]

sic

(sɪk)
determiner, adv
a Scot word for such

sic1

or sick

(sɪk)

v.t. sicked sicced (sikt), sick•ing sic•cing.
1. to attack (used esp. in commanding a dog): Sic 'em!
2. to incite to attack (usu. fol. by on).
[1835–45; variant of seek]

sic2

(sɪk)

adj. Chiefly Scot.
such.
[1325–75]

sic

(sik; Eng. sɪk)

adv. Latin.
so; thus: usu. placed within brackets to denote that a wording has been written intentionally or has been quoted verbatim: He signed his name as e. e. cummings
[sic]
.

sic


Past participle: sicked
Gerund: sicking

Imperative
sic
sic
Present
I sic
you sic
he/she/it sics
we sic
you sic
they sic
Preterite
I sicked
you sicked
he/she/it sicked
we sicked
you sicked
they sicked
Present Continuous
I am sicking
you are sicking
he/she/it is sicking
we are sicking
you are sicking
they are sicking
Present Perfect
I have sicked
you have sicked
he/she/it has sicked
we have sicked
you have sicked
they have sicked
Past Continuous
I was sicking
you were sicking
he/she/it was sicking
we were sicking
you were sicking
they were sicking
Past Perfect
I had sicked
you had sicked
he/she/it had sicked
we had sicked
you had sicked
they had sicked
Future
I will sic
you will sic
he/she/it will sic
we will sic
you will sic
they will sic
Future Perfect
I will have sicked
you will have sicked
he/she/it will have sicked
we will have sicked
you will have sicked
they will have sicked
Future Continuous
I will be sicking
you will be sicking
he/she/it will be sicking
we will be sicking
you will be sicking
they will be sicking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sicking
you have been sicking
he/she/it has been sicking
we have been sicking
you have been sicking
they have been sicking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sicking
you will have been sicking
he/she/it will have been sicking
we will have been sicking
you will have been sicking
they will have been sicking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sicking
you had been sicking
he/she/it had been sicking
we had been sicking
you had been sicking
they had been sicking
Conditional
I would sic
you would sic
he/she/it would sic
we would sic
you would sic
they would sic
Past Conditional
I would have sicked
you would have sicked
he/she/it would have sicked
we would have sicked
you would have sicked
they would have sicked

sic

A Latin word meaning thus, used in texts to show that something is quoted exactly from the original.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.sic - urge to attack someone; "The owner sicked his dogs on the intruders"; "the shaman sics sorcerers on the evil spirits"
assail, assault, set on, attack - attack someone physically or emotionally; "The mugger assaulted the woman"; "Nightmares assailed him regularly"
Adv.1.sic - intentionally so written (used after a printed word or phrase)
Translations
usuttaa

sic

[sɪk] ADVsic

sic

[ˈsɪk] advsic

sic

advsic

SIC

(Brit) abbr of Standard Industrial Classification˜ DIN

sic

[sɪk] adv (sic)(sic)
References in classic literature ?
He now approached the sick man with the noiseless step of one in full vigor of life, with his delicate white fingers raised from the green quilt the hand that was free, and turning sideways felt the pulse and reflected a moment.
Snow was poor, sick, and a member of her church--it was the duty of all the church members to look out for her, of course.
He was very sick, this white man, as sick as the black men who lay helpless about him, and whom he attended.
John, how can you expect sick people to come and see you when you keep all these animals in the house?
It had never occurred to Father Sergius that he could cure the sick.
From the very start me and Tom allowed that there was somebody sick in the stateroom next to ourn, because the meals was always toted in there by the waiters.
He had said he would fetch his wife, but now, taking stock of the emotion he was feeling, he decided that he would try on the contrary to persuade her not to go in to the sick man.
I have been every day, but the baby is sick, and I don't know what to do for it.