side by side


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side

 (sīd)
n.
1. Mathematics
a. A line bounding a plane figure.
b. A surface bounding a solid figure.
2.
a. A surface of an object, especially a surface joining a top and bottom: the four sides of a box.
b. A surface of an object that lies on the left or right of that object as viewed from the front or back: From the shore, I watched my friends dive off the side of the boat.
c. Either of the two surfaces of a thin, flat object: the front side of a piece of paper.
3.
a. The part within an object or area to the left or right of the observer or of its vertical axis.
b. The left or right half of the trunk of a human or animal body: always sleeps on his side; a side of beef.
4.
a. The space immediately next to someone: stood at her father's side.
b. The space immediately next to something. Often used in combination: courtside; dockside.
5. One of two or more contrasted parts or places within an area, identified by its location with respect to a center: the north side of the park.
6. An area separated from another area by an intervening feature, such as a line or barrier: on this side of the Atlantic; the district on the other side of the railroad tracks.
7.
a. One of two or more opposing individuals, groups, teams, or sets of opinions.
b. One of the positions maintained in a dispute or debate.
8. A distinct aspect: the shy side of his personality.
9. Line of descent: my aunt on my mother's side.
10. sides
a. An incomplete script that shows the lines and cues of a single performer only.
b. An incomplete script that shows only what is to be filmed on a specific day or shoot.
11. Chiefly British In billiards, the spin given to a propelled ball by striking it off center.
adj.
1. Located on a side: a side door.
2. From or to one side; oblique: a side view.
3. Minor; incidental: a side interest.
4. In addition to the main part; supplementary: a side benefit.
v. sid·ed, sid·ing, sides
v.tr.
1. To provide sides or siding for: side a frame house with aluminum.
2. To be positioned next to: a couch that is sided by low tables.
v.intr.
To align oneself in a disagreement: sided with the conservatives in Congress; siding against the bill.
Phrasal Verb:
side out
Sports In volleyball, to gain the right to serve by winning a volley served by the opposing team.
Idioms:
on the side
1. In addition to the main portion: coleslaw on the side.
2. In addition to the main occupation or activity: did some consulting work on the side.
side by side
Next to each other; close together.
this side of Informal
Verging on; short of: shady deals that were just this side of criminal.

[Middle English, from Old English sīde.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.side by side - nearest in space or positionside by side - nearest in space or position; immediately adjoining without intervening space; "had adjacent rooms"; "in the next room"; "the person sitting next to me"; "our rooms were side by side"
close - at or within a short distance in space or time or having elements near each other; "close to noon"; "how close are we to town?"; "a close formation of ships"
2.side by side - closely related or associated; "a city in which communism and democracy had to live side by side"
related, related to - being connected either logically or causally or by shared characteristics ; "painting and the related arts"; "school-related activities"; "related to micelle formation is the...ability of detergent actives to congregate at oil-water interfaces"
Translations
جَنْباً إلى جَنْب
bok po boku
hliî viî hliî

side

(said) noun
1. (the ground beside) an edge, border or boundary line. He walked round the side of the field; He lives on the same side of the street as me.
2. a surface of something. A cube has six sides.
3. one of the two of such surfaces which are not the top, bottom, front, or back. There is a label on the side of the box.
4. either surface of a piece of paper, cloth etc. Don't waste paper – write on both sides!
5. the right or left part of the body. I've got a pain in my side.
6. a part or division of a town etc. He lives on the north side of the town.
7. a slope (of a hill). a mountain-side.
8. a point of view; an aspect. We must look at all sides of the problem.
9. a party, team etc which is opposing another. Whose side are you on?; Which side is winning?
adjective
additional, but less important. a side issue.
-side
(the ground etc beside) the edge of something. He walked along the dockside/quayside; a roadside café.
-sided
having (a certain number or type of) sides. a four-sided figure.
ˈsidelong adjective, adverb
from or to the side; not directly. a sidelong glance; He glanced sidelong.
ˈsideways adjective, adverb
to or towards one side. He moved sideways; a sideways movement.
ˈsideburns noun plural
the usually short hair grown on the side of a man's face in front of the ears.
side effect
an additional (often bad) effect of a drug etc. These pills have unpleasant side effects.
ˈsidelight noun
a light fixed to the side, or at the side of the front or back, of a car, boat etc. He switched his sidelights on when it began to get dark.
ˈsideline noun
1. a business etc carried on outside one's regular job or activity. He runs a mail-order business as a sideline.
2. the line marking one of the long edges of a football pitch etc.
ˈsidelines noun plural
the position or point of view of a person not actually taking part in a sport, argument etc. He threw in the occasional suggestion from the sidelines.
side road
a small, minor road.
ˈsidesteppast tense, past participle ˈsidestepped verb
1. to step to one side. He sidestepped as his attacker tried to grab him.
2. to avoid. to sidestep a problem.
ˈside-street noun
a small, minor street. The man ran down a side-street and disappeared.
ˈsidetrack verb
to turn (a person) aside from what he was about to do. I intended to write letters this evening, but was sidetracked into going to the pictures instead.
ˈsidewalk noun
(American) a pavement or footpath.
from all sides
from every direction. People were running towards him from all sides.
on all sides
all around. With enemies on all sides, we were trapped.
side by side
beside one another; close together. They walked along the street side by side.
side with
to give support to in an argument etc. Don't side with him against us!
take sides
to choose to support a particular opinion, group etc against another. Everybody in the office took sides in the dispute.
References in classic literature ?
But he is too late: he finds lying side by side Antigone who had hanged herself and Haemon who also has perished by his own hand.
her husband graciously replied, as he removed the blotting-paper, and showed the two parchments lying side by side.
The hounds were joined into one pack, and "Uncle" and Nicholas rode on side by side.
Be that as it may, for days the man, the panther, and the great apes roamed their savage haunts side by side, making their kills together and sharing them with one another, and of all the fierce and savage band none was more terrible than the smooth-skinned, powerful beast that had been but a few short months before a familiar figure in many a London drawing room.
Huge hills and mountains of casks on casks were piled upon her wharves, and side by side the world-wandering whale ships lay silent and safely moored at last; while from others came a sound of carpenters and coopers, with blended noises of fires and forges to melt the pitch, all betokening that new cruises were on the start; that one most perilous and long voyage ended, only begins a second; and a second ended, only begins a third, and so on, for ever and for aye.
Perhaps, as the two men walked side by side, some faint foreshadowing of the future showed to Trent another and a larger world where they two would once more walk side by side, the outward differences between them lessened, the smouldering irritation of the present leaping up into the red-hot flame of hatred.
With both hands she brought it; and in a moment he was slipping off the pendants, one by one, until they lay, a round dozen of them, side by side, on the bed.
And as we stood near the taffrail side by side, my captain and I, looking at it, hardly discernible already, but still quite close-to on our quarter, he remarked in a meditative tone:
Emporiums of splendid dresses, the materials brought from every quarter of the world; tempting stores of everything to stimulate and pamper the sated appetite and give new relish to the oft-repeated feast; vessels of burnished gold and silver, wrought into every exquisite form of vase, and dish, and goblet; guns, swords, pistols, and patent engines of destruction; screws and irons for the crooked, clothes for the newly-born, drugs for the sick, coffins for the dead, and churchyards for the buried-- all these jumbled each with the other and flocking side by side, seemed to flit by in motley dance like the fantastic groups of the old Dutch painter, and with the same stern moral for the unheeding restless crowd.
She drew a green vase with a crinkled lip towards her, and began pulling out the tight little chrysanthemums, which she laid on the table-cloth, arranging them fastidiously side by side.
Screaming, cursing, and praying, laughing, singing, and moaning, they rush past side by side.
The cave was circular in shape, and all around its edge, near to the ground, appeared groups of dull yellow lights, two of them being always side by side.