siege


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siege

 (sēj)
n.
1. The surrounding and blockading of a city, town, or fortress by an army attempting to capture it.
2. A prolonged period, as of illness: a siege of asthma.
3. Obsolete A seat, especially a throne.
tr.v. sieged, sieg·ing, sieg·es
To subject to a siege; besiege: The invaders sieged the castle.

[Middle English sege, from Old French, seat, from Vulgar Latin *sedicum, from *sedicāre, to sit, from Latin sedēre; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

siege

(siːdʒ)
n
1. (Military)
a. the offensive operations carried out to capture a fortified place by surrounding it, severing its communications and supply lines, and deploying weapons against it
b. (as modifier): siege warfare.
2. a persistent attempt to gain something
3. a long tedious period, as of illness, etc
4. (Historical Terms) obsolete a seat or throne
5. (Military) lay siege to to besiege
vb
(tr) to besiege or assail
[C13: from Old French sege a seat, from Vulgar Latin sēdicāre (unattested) to sit down, from Latin sedēre]

siege

(sidʒ)

n., v. sieged, sieg•ing. n.
1. the act or process of surrounding and attacking a fortified place in such a way as to compel the surrender of the defenders.
2. any prolonged effort to overcome resistance.
3. a series of besetting illnesses or troubles: a siege of head colds.
4. a prolonged period of trouble.
5. Obs. a seat for a person of distinction; throne.
v.t.
6. to assail or assault; besiege.
Idioms:
lay siege to, to besiege.
[1175–1225; Middle English sege < Old French: seat, derivative of siegier < Vulgar Latin *sedicāre to set « Latin sedēre to sit]

Siege

 of herons: company of herons, from the way the heron waits for its prey in the shallows at its feet, 1452.
Examples: siege of bitterns, 1452; of cranes; of herons, 1452.

siege


Past participle: sieged
Gerund: sieging

Imperative
siege
siege
Present
I siege
you siege
he/she/it sieges
we siege
you siege
they siege
Preterite
I sieged
you sieged
he/she/it sieged
we sieged
you sieged
they sieged
Present Continuous
I am sieging
you are sieging
he/she/it is sieging
we are sieging
you are sieging
they are sieging
Present Perfect
I have sieged
you have sieged
he/she/it has sieged
we have sieged
you have sieged
they have sieged
Past Continuous
I was sieging
you were sieging
he/she/it was sieging
we were sieging
you were sieging
they were sieging
Past Perfect
I had sieged
you had sieged
he/she/it had sieged
we had sieged
you had sieged
they had sieged
Future
I will siege
you will siege
he/she/it will siege
we will siege
you will siege
they will siege
Future Perfect
I will have sieged
you will have sieged
he/she/it will have sieged
we will have sieged
you will have sieged
they will have sieged
Future Continuous
I will be sieging
you will be sieging
he/she/it will be sieging
we will be sieging
you will be sieging
they will be sieging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sieging
you have been sieging
he/she/it has been sieging
we have been sieging
you have been sieging
they have been sieging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sieging
you will have been sieging
he/she/it will have been sieging
we will have been sieging
you will have been sieging
they will have been sieging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sieging
you had been sieging
he/she/it had been sieging
we had been sieging
you had been sieging
they had been sieging
Conditional
I would siege
you would siege
he/she/it would siege
we would siege
you would siege
they would siege
Past Conditional
I would have sieged
you would have sieged
he/she/it would have sieged
we would have sieged
you would have sieged
they would have sieged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.siege - the action of an armed force that surrounds a fortified place and isolates it while continuing to attacksiege - the action of an armed force that surrounds a fortified place and isolates it while continuing to attack
blockade, encirclement - a war measure that isolates some area of importance to the enemy
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"

siege

noun blockade, encirclement, besiegement We must do everything possible to lift the siege.

siege

noun
1. A prolonged surrounding of an objective by hostile troops:
2. An often prolonged period, as of illness:
verb
To surround with hostile troops:
Idiom: lay siege to .
Translations
حِصار، مُحاصَرَه
obleženíobléhat
belejring
piirittääpiiritys
ostrom
umsátur
apgultis
aplenkums
obliehanie
obleganje

siege

[siːdʒ]
A. Ncerco m, sitio m
to lay siege tocercar, sitiar
to raise the siegelevantar el cerco
B. CPD siege economy Neconomía f de sitio
siege mentality N to have a siege mentalitytener manía persecutoria
siege warfare Nguerra f de sitio or asedio

siege

[ˈsiːdʒ] nsiège m
to lay siege to [+ town, city, building] [army] → assiéger; [journalists] → assiéger
to be under siege [town, city] → être assiégé(e) (fig) (= under pressure) → être assiégé(e)
to be under siege from all sides → être assiégé(e) de toutes partssiege economy néconomie f autarciquesiege mentality nmentalité f d'assiégé
to have a siege mentality → avoir une mentalité d'assiégé

siege

n (of town)Belagerung f; (by police) → Umstellung f; to be under siegebelagert werden; (by police) → umstellt sein; to lay siege to a towneine Stadt belagern; to lay siege to a houseein Haus umstellen; he attempted to lay siege to her emotionser versuchte, ihr Herz zu erobern

siege

[siːdʒ] nassedio
in a state of siege → in stato d'assedio
to lay siege to → porre l'assedio a

siege

(siːdʒ) noun
an attempt to capture a fort or town by keeping it surrounded by an armed force until it surrenders. The town is under siege.
siege is spelt with -ie- (not -ei-).
References in classic literature ?
A few succeeding days were passed amid the privations, the uproar, and the dangers of the siege, which was vigorously pressed by a power, against whose approaches Munro possessed no competent means of resistance.
They besieged us forty-eight hours; during which time seven of them were killed, and at last, finding themselves not likely to prevail, they raised the siege, and departed.
They were in for a siege, that was plainly to be seen.
Every Saturday she hires little Injuns to garrison her fort; then she lays siege to it, and makes military approaches by make-believe trenches in make-believe night, and finally at make-believe dawn she draws her sword and sounds the assault and takes it by storm.
One of them owned the castle and village on top of the mound which I have been speaking of, and in his absence his brother came with his knights and soldiers and began a siege.
I found it rather harassing to live in this state of siege, but was too much afraid of Mrs.
Nor will occasion want, nor shall we need With dangerous expedition to invade Heav'n, whose high walls fear no assault or Siege, Or ambush from the Deep.
Failing of which, we do pronounce to you, that we hold ye as robbers and traitors, and will wager our bodies against ye in battle, siege, or otherwise, and do our utmost to your annoyance and destruction.
And to set forth the valour of my own dear countrymen, I assured him, "that I had seen them blow up a hundred enemies at once in a siege, and as many in a ship, and beheld the dead bodies drop down in pieces from the clouds, to the great diversion of the spectators.
He watched it with that strange interest in trivial things that we try to develop when things of high import make us afraid, or when we are stirred by some new emotion for which we cannot find expression, or when some thought that terrifies us lays sudden siege to the brain and calls on us to yield.
And this was the easiest thing in the world for him to do, because Erik was one of the chief contractors under Philippe Garnier, the architect of the Opera, and continued to work by himself when the works were officially suspended, during the war, the siege of Paris and the Commune.
I heard a chain dragging along the ground, and a yoke of the great sulky white bullocks that drag the heavy siege guns when the elephants won't go any nearer to the firing, came shouldering along together.