siesta


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si·es·ta

 (sē-ĕs′tə)
n.
A rest or nap, especially one taken after the midday meal.

[Spanish, from Latin sexta (hōra), sixth (hour), midday, feminine of sextus, sixth; see sext1.]

siesta

(sɪˈɛstə)
n
a rest or nap, usually taken in the early afternoon, as in hot countries
[C17: from Spanish, from Latin sexta hōra the sixth hour, that is, noon]

si•es•ta

(siˈɛs tə)

n., pl. -tas.
a midday or afternoon rest or nap, esp. as taken in Spain and Latin America.
[1645–55; < Sp < Latin sexta (hōra) the sixth (hour), midday]

siesta

A Spanish word meaning sixth (hour), used to mean a sleep taken in the afternoon, especially after the midday meal.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.siesta - a nap in the early afternoon (especially in hot countries)siesta - a nap in the early afternoon (especially in hot countries)
cat sleep, catnap, forty winks, short sleep, snooze, nap - sleeping for a short period of time (usually not in bed)

siesta

noun nap, rest, sleep, doze, kip (Brit. slang), snooze (informal), catnap, forty winks (informal), zizz (Brit. informal) Many cultures have a siesta during the hottest part of the day.

siesta

noun
A brief sleep:
verb
To sleep for a brief period:
catnap, doze (off), nap, nod (off), snooze.
Translations

siesta

[sɪˈestə] Nsiesta f
to have or take a siestadormir la siesta

siesta

[siˈɛstə] nsieste f
to have a siesta, to take a siesta → faire la sieste

siesta

nSiesta f; to have or take a siestaSiesta halten or machen

siesta

[sɪˈɛstə] nsiesta
to have a siesta → schiacciare un pisolino
References in classic literature ?
Coquenard, after the luxuries of such a repast, which he called an excess, felt the want of a siesta.
The heat of the day had gradually decreased, and a light breeze arose, seeming like the respiration of nature on awakening from the burning siesta of the south.
It was asleep itself on the moss-grown cow-shed; on the group of white ducks nestling together with their bills tucked under their wings; on the old black sow stretched languidly on the straw, while her largest young one found an excellent spring-bed on his mother's fat ribs; on Alick, the shepherd, in his new smock-frock, taking an uneasy siesta, half-sitting, half-standing on the granary steps.
One, day about noon, happening to be at the Ti, I had lain down on the mats with several of the chiefs, and had gradually sunk into a most luxurious siesta, when I was awakened by a tremendous outcry, and starting up beheld the natives seizing their spears and hurrying out, while the most puissant of the chiefs, grasping the six muskets which were ranged against the bamboos, followed after, and soon disappeared in the groves.
All at once, in the midst of this delicious silence, there resounded a clear ringing laugh, which caused several of the halberdiers in the enjoyment of their siesta to open at least one eye.
He knew the people who never walked about with Baedekers, who had learnt to take a siesta after lunch, who took drives the pension tourists had never heard of, and saw by private influence galleries which were closed to them.
Joan was rummaging in the store-room, and Sheldon was taking his siesta in a hammock on the veranda.
After this exertion a siesta was considered the thing, and people lay about in tents or out as they pleased, the boys looking like warriors slumbering where they fell.
That afternoon, after a big long siesta, what'd I find in the kitchen, just as much at home as if she belonged there, but that blamed Indian girl.
It took a short siesta at noon, and boomed once more toward night, as the sun was withdrawing his influence.
I'm just taking a siesta in the sunshine," snapped the man irritably.
It was in the early heat of August, and the hour that of the lawful and necessary siesta for such as turn night into day.