sign on


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Related to sign on: Single sign on

sign

 (sīn)
n.
1. Something that suggests the presence or existence of a fact, condition, or quality: A high temperature is a sign of fever.
2.
a. An act or gesture used to convey an idea, a desire, information, or a command: gave the go-ahead sign. See Synonyms at gesture.
b. Sign language.
3.
a. A displayed structure bearing lettering or symbols, used to identify or advertise a place of business: a motel with a flashing neon sign outside.
b. A posted notice bearing a designation, direction, or command: an EXIT sign above a door; a traffic sign.
4. A conventional figure or device that stands for a word, phrase, or operation; a symbol, as in mathematics or in musical notation.
5. pl. sign An indicator, such as a dropping or footprint, of the trail of an animal: looking for deer sign.
6. A trace or vestige: no sign of life.
7. A portentous incident or event; a presage: took the eclipse as a sign from God.
8. Medicine An objective finding, usually detected on physical examination, from a laboratory test, or on an x-ray, that indicates the presence of abnormality or disease.
9. One of the 12 divisions of the zodiac, each named for a constellation and represented by a symbol.
v. signed, sign·ing, signs
v.tr.
1. To affix one's signature to: signed the letter.
2. To write (one's signature): signed her name to the contract.
3. To approve or ratify (a document) by affixing a signature, seal, or other mark: sign a bill into law.
4. To hire or engage by obtaining a signature on a contract: signed a rookie pitcher for next season; sign up actors for a tour.
5. To relinquish or transfer title to by signature: signed away all her claims to the estate.
6. To provide with a sign or signs: sign a new highway.
7. To communicate with a sign or signs: signed his approval with a nod.
8. To express (a word or thought, for example) in a sign language: signed her reply to the question.
9. To consecrate with the sign of the cross.
v.intr.
1. To make a sign or signs; signal.
2. To communicate in a sign language.
3. To write one's signature.
Phrasal Verbs:
sign in
1. To record the arrival of another or oneself by signing a register.
2. To log in to a website or network.
sign off
1. To announce the end of a communication; conclude.
2. To stop transmission after identifying the broadcasting station.
3. Informal To express approval formally or conclusively: got Congress to sign off on the new tax proposal.
sign on
1. To enlist oneself, especially as an employee: "Retired politicians often sign on with top-dollar law firms" (New York Times).
2. To be in agreement with something; accept or support something: a senator who signed on to the president's tax policy.
3. To start transmission with an identification of the broadcasting station.
sign out
1. To record the departure of another or oneself by signing a register.
2. To log out of a website or network.
sign up
To agree to be a participant or recipient by signing one's name; enlist: signed up for military service; signing up for a pottery course.

[Middle English signe, from Old French, from Latin signum; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]

sign′er n.

sign on

vb (adverb)
1. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) (tr) to hire or employ
2. (intr) to commit oneself to a job, activity, etc
3. (Social Welfare) (intr) Brit to register as unemployed with the Department of Social Security
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.sign on - engage by written agreement; "They signed two new pitchers for the next season"
hire, employ, engage - engage or hire for work; "They hired two new secretaries in the department"; "How many people has she employed?"
contract out - assign a job to someone outside one's own business

sign

noun
1. Something visible or evident that gives grounds for believing in the existence or presence of something else:
2. Something that takes the place of words in communicating a thought or feeling:
3. An expressive, meaningful bodily movement:
Informal: high sign.
4. A usually public posting that conveys a message:
5. A conventional mark used in a writing system:
6. A phenomenon that serves as a sign or warning of some future good or evil:
Idiom: writing on the wall.
verb
1. To affix one's signature to:
Idioms: put one's John Hancock on, set one's hand to.
2. To make bodily motions so as to convey an idea or complement speech:
Idiom: give the high sign.
phrasal verb
sign on
Informal. To become a member of:
phrasal verb
sign over
To change the ownership of (property) by means of a legal document:
phrasal verb
sign up
To become a member of:
Informal: sign on.
Translations
hlásit se
melde sig ledig
ilmoittautua työttömäksi
uzimati socijalnu pomoć
失業登録をする
실업 등록하다
anställa
เซ็นลงทะเบียนเพื่อรับเงินสวัสดิการ
đăng ký tại phòng trợ cấp thất nghiệp

w>sign on

vt sep = sign up VT
vi
= sign up VI
(Brit: for unemployment benefit etc) to sign on (for unemployment benefit) (= apply)sich arbeitslos melden; he’s still signing oner ist immer noch arbeitslos, er bezieht immer noch Arbeitslosenunterstützung
(disc jockey etc)sich melden
vi +prep obj to sign on (the dole) (Brit) → sich arbeitslos melden

sign on

يُخْبِرُ الـحُكُومَةَ بِبَاطِلِه hlásit se melde sig ledig arbeitslos melden (sich) εγγράφομαι σε μητρώο ανέργων alistarse, inscribirse ilmoittautua työttömäksi s’engager uzimati socijalnu pomoć iscriversi 失業登録をする 실업 등록하다 registreren anmelde zaangażować inscrever, solicitar seguro-desemprego регистрироваться на бирже труда anställa เซ็นลงทะเบียนเพื่อรับเงินสวัสดิการ kaydolmak đăng ký tại phòng trợ cấp thất nghiệp 申请失业救济
References in classic literature ?
He can sign on for ten dollars a month if he works for the ship all his time.
Well, I guess we'll just sign on this steward at sixty a month and all he asks, or I'll just naturally quit you cold on the next fast steamer to San Francisco.
I met the seal-hunter, Pete Holt, and agreed to be his boat-puller and to sign on any schooner he signed on.
However, I had to smile at my own forgetfulness when I got nearer and read this sign on his tabard: