signify

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sig·ni·fy

 (sĭg′nə-fī′)
v. sig·ni·fied, sig·ni·fy·ing, sig·ni·fies
v.tr.
1. To denote; mean: A red traffic light signifies that traffic must stop.
2. To be a sign or indication of; suggest or imply: The test results will signify how serious the problem is. The surge in housing starts signifies an upturn in the economy.
3. To make known, as with a sign or word: He signified his disagreement with a frown.
v.intr.
1. To have meaning or importance.
2. Slang To exchange humorous insults in a verbal game.

[Middle English signifien, from Old French signifier, from Latin significāre : signum, sign; see sign + -ficāre, -fy.]

sig′ni·fi′a·ble adj.
sig′ni·fi′er n.

signify

(ˈsɪɡnɪˌfaɪ)
vb (when tr, may take a clause as object) , -fies, -fying or -fied
1. (tr) to indicate, show, or suggest
2. (tr) to imply or portend: the clouds signified the coming storm.
3. (tr) to stand as a symbol, sign, etc (for)
4. (intr) informal to be significant or important
[C13: from Old French signifier, from Latin significāre, from signum a sign, mark + facere to make]
ˈsigniˌfiable adj
ˈsigniˌfier n

sig•ni•fy

(ˈsɪg nəˌfaɪ)

v. -fied, -fy•ing. v.t.
1. to make known by signs, speech, or action.
2. to be a sign of; mean; portend.
v.i.
3. to be of importance or consequence.
[1200–50; Middle English < Old French signifier < Latin significāre to make a sign, indicate. See sign, -i-, -fy]

signify


Past participle: signified
Gerund: signifying

Imperative
signify
signify
Present
I signify
you signify
he/she/it signifies
we signify
you signify
they signify
Preterite
I signified
you signified
he/she/it signified
we signified
you signified
they signified
Present Continuous
I am signifying
you are signifying
he/she/it is signifying
we are signifying
you are signifying
they are signifying
Present Perfect
I have signified
you have signified
he/she/it has signified
we have signified
you have signified
they have signified
Past Continuous
I was signifying
you were signifying
he/she/it was signifying
we were signifying
you were signifying
they were signifying
Past Perfect
I had signified
you had signified
he/she/it had signified
we had signified
you had signified
they had signified
Future
I will signify
you will signify
he/she/it will signify
we will signify
you will signify
they will signify
Future Perfect
I will have signified
you will have signified
he/she/it will have signified
we will have signified
you will have signified
they will have signified
Future Continuous
I will be signifying
you will be signifying
he/she/it will be signifying
we will be signifying
you will be signifying
they will be signifying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been signifying
you have been signifying
he/she/it has been signifying
we have been signifying
you have been signifying
they have been signifying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been signifying
you will have been signifying
he/she/it will have been signifying
we will have been signifying
you will have been signifying
they will have been signifying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been signifying
you had been signifying
he/she/it had been signifying
we had been signifying
you had been signifying
they had been signifying
Conditional
I would signify
you would signify
he/she/it would signify
we would signify
you would signify
they would signify
Past Conditional
I would have signified
you would have signified
he/she/it would have signified
we would have signified
you would have signified
they would have signified
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.signify - denote or connote; "`maison' means `house' in French"; "An example sentence would show what this word means"
denote, refer - have as a meaning; "`multi-' denotes `many' "
signify - convey or express a meaning; "These words mean nothing to me!"; "What does his strange behavior signify?"
2.signify - convey or express a meaning; "These words mean nothing to me!"; "What does his strange behavior signify?"
signify, stand for, mean, intend - denote or connote; "`maison' means `house' in French"; "An example sentence would show what this word means"
mean, intend - mean or intend to express or convey; "You never understand what I mean!"; "what do his words intend?"
3.signify - make known with a word or signal; "He signified his wish to pay the bill for our meal"
indicate - to state or express briefly; "indicated his wishes in a letter"

signify

verb
1. indicate, show, mean, matter, suggest, announce, evidence, represent, express, imply, exhibit, communicate, intimate, stand for, proclaim, convey, be a sign of, symbolize, denote, connote, portend, betoken The two approaches signified a sharp difference between the men.
2. make known, show, express, indicate, announce, display, declare, signal, register, communicate, proclaim Two jurors signified their dissent.

signify

verb
1. To have or convey a particular idea:
Idiom: add up to.
2. To be of significance or importance:
Translations
يُظْهِر، يُبَيِّنيَعْني، يكون إشارَةً
projevitznamenat
betydetilkendegive
merkjasÿna
prasmingas
izrādītnorādīt uznozīmētparādīt
pomeniti

signify

[ˈsɪgnɪfaɪ]
A. VT
1. (= mean) → querer decir, significar
what does it signify?¿qué quiere decir?, ¿qué significa?
2. (= make known) → indicar
to signify one's approvalindicar su aprobación
B. VI it does not signifyno importa
in the wider context it does not signifyen el contexto más amplio no tiene importancia

signify

[ˈsɪgnɪfaɪ] vt
(= represent) → signifier
the orange robes that signify a follower of Hare Krishna
BUT les robes oranges qui signalent un adepte de Hare Krishna.
(= indicate) → signifier
to signify that ... → signifier que ...

signify

vt
(= mean)bedeuten
(= indicate)andeuten, erkennen lassen
vi (dated) it/he doesn’t signifydas/er spielt keine Rolle

signify

[ˈsɪgnɪˌfaɪ]
1. vt (mean) → significare; (indicate) → indicare; (make known) → manifestare, esprimere

signify

(ˈsignifai) verb
1. to be a sign of; to mean. His frown signified disapproval.
2. to show; to make known by a sign, gesture etc. He signified his approval with a nod.
significance (sigˈnifikəns) noun
meaning or importance. a matter of great significance.
significant (sigˈnifikənt) adjective
1. important; having an important effect. a significant event/development.
2. having a special meaning; meaningful. a significant look/smile.
3. considerable; marked. There was no significant change in the patient's condition; There was a significant drop in the number of road accidents last year.
significantly (sigˈnifikəntli) adverb
1. in a significant manner. He patted his pocket significantly.
2. to an important degree. Sales-levels are significantly lower than last year, which is very disappointing.

signify

v. significar.
References in classic literature ?
Well, a fowl, fish, game, -- it signifies little, so that I eat.
It signifies nothing whether you eat much or little -- whether you have ten dishes or one -- it is always the same price.
It signifies nothing what becomes of them, though they are turned away, and ruined ever so much.
Can it be, then, that by that act of physical isolation, he signifies his spiritual withdrawal for the time, from all outward worldly ties and connexions?
NHS signifies members of Shaman Chapter of the National Honor Society.
5m sale of the North East building occupied by Tesco Bank has signifies "signifies the region's ability to secure large deals".
In his message, he has said that the festival of lights signifies the victory of good over evil and is an appropriate occasion for people to resolve to follow the high ideals in life.
Papers explore music's relationship to philosophy, literature, poetry, folk traditions, and the theatre (with a particular focus on opera as an intermodal expression of music); the ways in which music signifies "topics" (such as the "pastoral"); connections between how music signifies and the natural (including the ways in which human brain function and the natural motions of the human body); and Monelle's engagement with Derrida and deconstruction.
This is not, however, the theory of Buridan's which David Miller discusses in his careful and revealing study (Miller 2011), but an earlier and less well known theory of Buridan's, that every sentence, including the Liar, signifies its own truth, but the result is the same.
1]mean 1, denote <A check mark signifies a correct answer.
According to the royal astrologer, grass signifies bad luck for farmers as insects might disrupt the crops, and wine signifies turmoil and fighting as the country experienced for several decades.