signing


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Related to signing: Code signing, Signing bonus

sign

 (sīn)
n.
1. Something that suggests the presence or existence of a fact, condition, or quality: A high temperature is a sign of fever.
2.
a. An act or gesture used to convey an idea, a desire, information, or a command: gave the go-ahead sign. See Synonyms at gesture.
b. Sign language.
3.
a. A displayed structure bearing lettering or symbols, used to identify or advertise a place of business: a motel with a flashing neon sign outside.
b. A posted notice bearing a designation, direction, or command: an EXIT sign above a door; a traffic sign.
4. A conventional figure or device that stands for a word, phrase, or operation; a symbol, as in mathematics or in musical notation.
5. pl. sign An indicator, such as a dropping or footprint, of the trail of an animal: looking for deer sign.
6. A trace or vestige: no sign of life.
7. A portentous incident or event; a presage: took the eclipse as a sign from God.
8. Medicine An objective finding, usually detected on physical examination, from a laboratory test, or on an x-ray, that indicates the presence of abnormality or disease.
9. One of the 12 divisions of the zodiac, each named for a constellation and represented by a symbol.
v. signed, sign·ing, signs
v.tr.
1. To affix one's signature to: signed the letter.
2. To write (one's signature): signed her name to the contract.
3. To approve or ratify (a document) by affixing a signature, seal, or other mark: sign a bill into law.
4. To hire or engage by obtaining a signature on a contract: signed a rookie pitcher for next season; sign up actors for a tour.
5. To relinquish or transfer title to by signature: signed away all her claims to the estate.
6. To provide with a sign or signs: sign a new highway.
7. To communicate with a sign or signs: signed his approval with a nod.
8. To express (a word or thought, for example) by sign language: signed her reply to the question.
9. To consecrate with the sign of the cross.
v.intr.
1. To make a sign or signs; signal.
2. To use sign language.
3. To write one's signature.
Phrasal Verbs:
sign in
To record the arrival of another or oneself by signing a register.
sign off
1. To announce the end of a communication; conclude.
2. To stop transmission after identifying the broadcasting station.
3. Informal To express approval formally or conclusively: got Congress to sign off on the new tax proposal.
sign on
1. To enlist oneself, especially as an employee: "Retired politicians often sign on with top-dollar law firms" (New York Times).
2. To be in agreement with something; accept or support something: a senator who signed on to the president's tax policy.
3. To start transmission with an identification of the broadcasting station.
sign out
To record the departure of another or oneself by signing a register.
sign up
To agree to be a participant or recipient by signing one's name; enlist: signed up for military service; signing up for a pottery course.

[Middle English signe, from Old French, from Latin signum; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]

sign′er n.

signing

(ˈsaɪnɪŋ)
n
(Languages) a specific set of manual signs used to communicate with deaf people
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.signing - language expressed by visible hand gesturessigning - language expressed by visible hand gestures
language, linguistic communication - a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols; "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it is written"
finger spelling, fingerspelling - an alphabet of manual signs
American sign language, ASL - the sign language used in the United States
sign - a gesture that is part of a sign language
Translations

signing

[ˈsaɪnɪŋ] N
1. [of letter, contract, treaty etc] → firma f
2. (Sport) → fichaje m
3. (= sign language) → lenguaje m por señas

signing

[ˈsaɪnɪŋ] n
[document, letter, treaty] → signature f
[player, group, singer] → recrutement m
Manchester United's signing of goalkeeper Mark Bosnich → le recrutement par le club de Manchester United du gardien de but Mark Bosnich
(= player, group, singer) → nouvelle recrue f
(= sign language) → langue f des signessign language n (for deaf people)langage m des signes

signing

n
(of document)Unterzeichnen nt
(of football player, pop star etc)Untervertragnahme f; (= football player, pop star etc)neu unter Vertrag Genommene(r) mf
(= sign language)Gebärdensprache f
References in classic literature ?
Laurie was signing and sealing as he spoke, and did not look up till a great tear dropped on the paper.
All fair," said the trader; "and now for signing these yer.
I leant forward also, for the purpose of signing to Heathcliff, whose step I recognised, not to come further; and, at the instant when my eye quitted Hareton, he gave a sudden spring, delivered himself from the careless grasp that held him, and fell.
Say those few words in your usual manner -- and, when the signing is over, I will see myself to your packing-up, and your warm things.
After some gruff coughing and rubbing of his chin and signing with his hand, Jerry attracted the notice of Mr.
Of her soon cheering up again, and our signing the register all round.
Most likely he talked Brown into signing it just as he talked us.
I am sorry to have to trouble you at a time when you must be so very busy, renewing important engagements, signing fresh ones and generally displaying your excellent taste.
Within five months from the signing of the agreement, there had to be a reorganization; and the American Bell Telephone Company was created, with six million dollars capital.
Well then, if that be so," said Sancho, "how is it that your worship makes all those you overcome by your arm go to present themselves before my lady Dulcinea, this being the same thing as signing your name to it that you love her and are her lover?
Meanwhile the King in great wrath had risen to depart, first signing the judges to distribute the prizes.
But let us further suppose that in a subsequent part of the same act it should be declared that no woman should dispose of any estate of a determinate value without the consent of three of her nearest relations, signified by their signing the deed; could it be inferred from this regulation that a married woman might not procure the approbation of her relations to a deed for conveying property of inferior value?