signs


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Related to signs: horoscope, Signs of pregnancy

sign

 (sīn)
n.
1. Something that suggests the presence or existence of a fact, condition, or quality: A high temperature is a sign of fever.
2.
a. An act or gesture used to convey an idea, a desire, information, or a command: gave the go-ahead sign. See Synonyms at gesture.
b. Sign language.
3.
a. A displayed structure bearing lettering or symbols, used to identify or advertise a place of business: a motel with a flashing neon sign outside.
b. A posted notice bearing a designation, direction, or command: an EXIT sign above a door; a traffic sign.
4. A conventional figure or device that stands for a word, phrase, or operation; a symbol, as in mathematics or in musical notation.
5. pl. sign An indicator, such as a dropping or footprint, of the trail of an animal: looking for deer sign.
6. A trace or vestige: no sign of life.
7. A portentous incident or event; a presage: took the eclipse as a sign from God.
8. Medicine An objective finding, usually detected on physical examination, from a laboratory test, or on an x-ray, that indicates the presence of abnormality or disease.
9. One of the 12 divisions of the zodiac, each named for a constellation and represented by a symbol.
v. signed, sign·ing, signs
v.tr.
1. To affix one's signature to: signed the letter.
2. To write (one's signature): signed her name to the contract.
3. To approve or ratify (a document) by affixing a signature, seal, or other mark: sign a bill into law.
4. To hire or engage by obtaining a signature on a contract: signed a rookie pitcher for next season; sign up actors for a tour.
5. To relinquish or transfer title to by signature: signed away all her claims to the estate.
6. To provide with a sign or signs: sign a new highway.
7. To communicate with a sign or signs: signed his approval with a nod.
8. To express (a word or thought, for example) in a sign language: signed her reply to the question.
9. To consecrate with the sign of the cross.
v.intr.
1. To make a sign or signs; signal.
2. To communicate in a sign language.
3. To write one's signature.
Phrasal Verbs:
sign in
1. To record the arrival of another or oneself by signing a register.
2. To log in to a website or network.
sign off
1. To announce the end of a communication; conclude.
2. To stop transmission after identifying the broadcasting station.
3. Informal To express approval formally or conclusively: got Congress to sign off on the new tax proposal.
sign on
1. To enlist oneself, especially as an employee: "Retired politicians often sign on with top-dollar law firms" (New York Times).
2. To be in agreement with something; accept or support something: a senator who signed on to the president's tax policy.
3. To start transmission with an identification of the broadcasting station.
sign out
1. To record the departure of another or oneself by signing a register.
2. To log out of a website or network.
sign up
To agree to be a participant or recipient by signing one's name; enlist: signed up for military service; signing up for a pottery course.

[Middle English signe, from Old French, from Latin signum; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]

sign′er n.

signs

  • conjecture - First meant "the interpretation of omens or signs" or "divination," and it literally means "to throw together," that is, to produce a theory by putting together a number of facts.
  • diacritic - From Greek diakrinein, "distinguish from," it denotes marks or signs that distinguish different values or sounds (pronunciations) of a letter.
  • semiopathy - A tendency to read humorously inappropriate meanings into signs.
  • sigla - The words for signs and abbreviations representing words.
References in classic literature ?
Zoned by those letters you saw the likeness of three Andes' summits; from one a flame; a tower on another; on the third a crowing cock; while arching over all was a segment of the partitioned zodiac, the signs all marked with their usual cabalistics, and the keystone sun entering the equinoctial point at Libra.
This cannot be if my wife signs as well as myself, because we have but one opinion between us, and that opinion is mine.
doan' talk to ME -- signs is SIGNS, mine I tell you; en I knowed jis' 's well 'at I 'uz gwineter be rich agin as I's a- stannin' heah dis minute
But it did not move Gagool or Gagool's master, though I saw signs of pity among the guards behind, and on the faces of the chiefs; and as for Good, he gave a fierce snort of indignation, and made a motion as though to go to her assistance.
Libels and licentious discourses against the state, when they are frequent and open; and in like sort, false news often running up and down, to the disadvantage of the state, and hastily embraced; are amongst the signs of troubles.
For a while, she was much bewildered; and after waiting about two weeks, until she became acquainted with her new locality, and somewhat familiar with the inmates, the attempt was made to give her knowledge of arbitrary signs, by which she could interchange thoughts with others.
I hallooed again to him, and made signs to come forward, which he easily understood, and came a little way; then stopped again, and then a little farther, and stopped again; and I could then perceive that he stood trembling, as if he had been taken prisoner, and had just been to be killed, as his two enemies were.
They brought me a second hogshead, which I drank in the same manner, and made signs for more; but they had none to give me.
Now Monsieur de Chavigny piqued himself on his infallible penetration; for that which almost proved that he was the son of Richelieu was his everlasting pretension; he examined attentively the countenance of the applicant for place and fancied that the contracted eyebrows, thin lips, hooked nose, and prominent cheek-bones of Grimaud were favorable signs.
he called to him his son, a young cook of great promise, and with tears in his eyes, he recommended him to preserve carefully the secret of the macaroni, to Frenchify his name, and at length, when the political horizon should be cleared from the clouds which obscured it -- this was practiced then as in our day, to order of the nearest smith a handsome sign, upon which a famous painter, whom he named, should design two queens' portraits, with these words as a legend: "To The Medici.
With halting steps I paced the streets, and passed the sign of The Crossed Harpoons --but it looked too expensive and jolly there.
This sign I give unto you: every people speaketh its language of good and evil: this its neighbour understandeth not.