signs


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Related to signs: horoscope, Signs of pregnancy

sign

 (sīn)
n.
1. Something that suggests the presence or existence of a fact, condition, or quality: A high temperature is a sign of fever.
2.
a. An act or gesture used to convey an idea, a desire, information, or a command: gave the go-ahead sign. See Synonyms at gesture.
b. Sign language.
3.
a. A displayed structure bearing lettering or symbols, used to identify or advertise a place of business: a motel with a flashing neon sign outside.
b. A posted notice bearing a designation, direction, or command: an EXIT sign above a door; a traffic sign.
4. A conventional figure or device that stands for a word, phrase, or operation; a symbol, as in mathematics or in musical notation.
5. pl. sign An indicator, such as a dropping or footprint, of the trail of an animal: looking for deer sign.
6. A trace or vestige: no sign of life.
7. A portentous incident or event; a presage: took the eclipse as a sign from God.
8. Medicine An objective finding, usually detected on physical examination, from a laboratory test, or on an x-ray, that indicates the presence of abnormality or disease.
9. One of the 12 divisions of the zodiac, each named for a constellation and represented by a symbol.
v. signed, sign·ing, signs
v.tr.
1. To affix one's signature to: signed the letter.
2. To write (one's signature): signed her name to the contract.
3. To approve or ratify (a document) by affixing a signature, seal, or other mark: sign a bill into law.
4. To hire or engage by obtaining a signature on a contract: signed a rookie pitcher for next season; sign up actors for a tour.
5. To relinquish or transfer title to by signature: signed away all her claims to the estate.
6. To provide with a sign or signs: sign a new highway.
7. To communicate with a sign or signs: signed his approval with a nod.
8. To express (a word or thought, for example) in a sign language: signed her reply to the question.
9. To consecrate with the sign of the cross.
v.intr.
1. To make a sign or signs; signal.
2. To communicate in a sign language.
3. To write one's signature.
Phrasal Verbs:
sign in
1. To record the arrival of another or oneself by signing a register.
2. To log in to a website or network.
sign off
1. To announce the end of a communication; conclude.
2. To stop transmission after identifying the broadcasting station.
3. Informal To express approval formally or conclusively: got Congress to sign off on the new tax proposal.
sign on
1. To enlist oneself, especially as an employee: "Retired politicians often sign on with top-dollar law firms" (New York Times).
2. To be in agreement with something; accept or support something: a senator who signed on to the president's tax policy.
3. To start transmission with an identification of the broadcasting station.
sign out
1. To record the departure of another or oneself by signing a register.
2. To log out of a website or network.
sign up
To agree to be a participant or recipient by signing one's name; enlist: signed up for military service; signing up for a pottery course.

[Middle English signe, from Old French, from Latin signum; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]

sign′er n.

signs

  • conjecture - First meant "the interpretation of omens or signs" or "divination," and it literally means "to throw together," that is, to produce a theory by putting together a number of facts.
  • diacritic - From Greek diakrinein, "distinguish from," it denotes marks or signs that distinguish different values or sounds (pronunciations) of a letter.
  • semiopathy - A tendency to read humorously inappropriate meanings into signs.
  • sigla - The words for signs and abbreviations representing words.
References in classic literature ?
Out came Meg, with gray horsehair hanging about her face, a red and black robe, a staff, and cabalistic signs upon her cloak.
At first, used as they were to the actions of unscrupulous rivals in trying to thwart their efforts, Tom and Ned had been on the alert for any signs of hidden enemies on board the steamer.
They went about making signs to people, and until the Shimerdas came they had no friends.
The deepest sounds of the retiring and invisible column had ceased to be borne on the breeze to the listeners, and the latest straggler had already disappeared in pursuit; but there still remained the signs of another departure, before a log cabin of unusual size and accommodations, in front of which those sentinels paced their rounds, who were known to guard the person of the English general.
No signs of life occurred near him, but occasionally the melancholy chirp of a cricket, or perhaps the guttural twang of a bull-frog from a neighboring marsh, as if sleeping uncomfortably and turning suddenly in his bed.
It was a pity that, somehow, to settle this once for all, I had equally to re-enumerate the signs of subtlety that, in the afternoon, by the lake had made a miracle of my show of self-possession.
In an extensive herd, so remarkable, occasionally, are these mystic gestures, that I have heard hunters who have declared them akin to Free-Mason signs and symbols; that the whale, indeed, by these methods intelligently conversed with the world.
Union Headquarters"--that was the way the signs ran.
doan' talk to ME -- signs is SIGNS, mine I tell you; en I knowed jis' 's well 'at I 'uz gwineter be rich agin as I's a- stannin' heah dis minute
First off he looked surprised to see us, and not very glad, either; but as Tom went on he looked pleasanter, and when he was done he smiled, and nodded his head several times, and made signs with his hands, and says:
They brought me a second hogshead, which I drank in the same manner, and made signs for more; but they had none to give me.
I could see them examining the dead sailors, evidently for signs of life, and presently a party of them appeared from below dragging a little figure among them.