silks


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silk

 (sĭlk)
n.
1.
a. A fine lustrous fiber composed mainly of fibroin and produced by certain insect larvae to form cocoons, especially the strong, elastic, fibrous secretion of silkworms used to make thread and fabric.
b. Thread or fabric made from this fiber.
c. A garment made from this fabric.
2.
a. A silky filamentous material spun by a spider or an insect such as a webspinner.
b. A silky filamentous material produced by a plant, such as the styles forming a tuft on an ear of corn.
3. silks The brightly colored identifying garments of a jockey or harness driver.
adj.
Composed of or similar to the fiber or the fabric silk.
intr.v. silked, silk·ing, silks
To develop silk. Used of corn.

[Middle English, from Old English sioloc, probably of Slavic origin (akin to Old Church Slavonic šelkŭ), ultimately from Greek sērikon, neuter of sērikos, silken; see serge1.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.silks - the brightly colored garments of a jockeysilks - the brightly colored garments of a jockey; emblematic of the stable
garment - an article of clothing; "garments of the finest silk"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
References in classic literature ?
And that Lena Lingard, that was always a bad one, say what you will, had turned out so well, and was coming home here every summer in her silks and her satins, and doing so much for her mother.
Those narrow straits of Sunda divide Sumatra from Java; and standing midway in that vast rampart of islands, buttressed by that bold green promontory, known to seamen as Java Head; they not a little correspond to the central gateway opening into some vast walled empire: and considering the inexhaustible wealth of spices, and silks, and jewels, and gold, and ivory, with which the thousand islands of that oriental sea are enriched, it seems a significant provision of nature, that such treasures, by the very formation of the land, should at least bear the appearance, however ineffectual, of being guarded from the all-grasping western world.
My raiment was of silks and velvets and cloth of gold, and by consequence was very showy, also uncomfort- able.
They say they got it out of the Middle Ages - out of a book - and it is all red and blue and white silks and satins and velvets; tights, trunks, sword, doublet with slashed sleeves, short cape, cap with just one feather in it; I've heard them name these things; they got them out of the book; she's dressed like a page, of old times, they say.
It had formerly been Charlotte's, and over the mantelpiece still hung a landscape in coloured silks of her performance, in proof of her having spent seven years at a great school in town to some effect.
Captain Wragge mentally appraised t he rings, bracelets, and necklaces, the silks, satins, and laces of the daughter of a gentleman of fortune, at -- say, a third of their real value.
If he needed a King and Queen to restore him, he was fortunate in having his remedy at hand; for, soon the large-faced King and the fair-faced Queen came in their golden coach, attended by the shining Bull's Eye of their Court, a glittering multitude of laughing ladies and fine lords; and in jewels and silks and powder and splendour and elegantly spurning figures and handsomely disdainful faces of both sexes, the mender of roads bathed himself, so much to his temporary intoxication, that he cried Long live the King, Long live the Queen, Long live everybody and everything
She was dressed in rich materials - satins, and lace, and silks - all of white.
Yet, thought I, I would rather smuggle one of those little print gowns into my berth than all the silks a sea-faring friend of mine takes the trouble to smuggle from far Cathay.
The queen likewise ordered the thinnest silks that could be gotten, to make me clothes, not much thicker than an English blanket, very cumbersome till I was accustomed to them.
And so, for a whole year, he sought to accumulate the most exquisite specimens that he could find of textile and embroidered work, getting the dainty Delhi muslins, finely wrought with gold-thread palmates and stitched over with iridescent beetles' wings; the Dacca gauzes, that from their transparency are known in the East as "woven air," and "running water," and "evening dew"; strange figured cloths from Java; elaborate yellow Chinese hangings; books bound in tawny satins or fair blue silks and wrought with fleurs-de-lis, birds and images; veils of lacis worked in Hungary point; Sicilian brocades and stiff Spanish velvets; Georgian work, with its gilt coins, and Japanese Foukousas, with their green-toned golds and their marvellously plumaged birds.
They wear all sorts of silks, and particularly the fine velvets of Turkey.