sinecurist


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si·ne·cure

 (sī′nĭ-kyo͝or′, sĭn′ĭ-)
n.
1. A position or office that requires little or no work but provides a salary.
2. Archaic An ecclesiastical benefice not attached to the spiritual duties of a parish.

[From Medieval Latin (beneficium) sine cūrā, (benefice) without cure (of souls) : Latin sine, without + Latin cūrā, ablative of cūra, care; see cure.]

si′ne·cur·ism n.
si′ne·cur′ist n.
References in classic literature ?
That perhaps it was a little indecent that the principal registrar of all, whose duty it was to find the public, constantly resorting to this place, all needful accommodation, should be an enormous sinecurist in virtue of that post (and might be, besides, a clergyman, a pluralist, the holder of a staff in a cathedral, and what not), - while the public was put to the inconvenience of which we had a specimen every afternoon when the office was busy, and which we knew to be quite monstrous.
14 that the PC "is not wasting any time" in its eagerness to end the dominance of Lugo and the APC, and she described the dictatorship's old party as solely "responsible for having created, during its six decades of government, a sinecurist and corrupt bureaucracy.
There was again, an administrative rationale, for the excise was collected by efficient bureaucrats rather than lay commissioners (as with the assessed and land taxes) or sinecurists (as with the customs).