sinew


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sin·ew

 (sĭn′yo͞o)
n.
1. A tendon.
2. Vigorous strength; muscular power.
3. often sinews The source or mainstay of vitality and strength: "Good company and good discourse are the very sinews of virtue" (Izaak Walton).
tr.v. sin·ewed, sin·ew·ing, sin·ews
To strengthen with or as if with sinews.

[Middle English sinewe, from Old English sinewe, oblique form of seonu, sinu.]

sinew

(ˈsɪnjuː)
n
1. (Anatomy) anatomy another name for tendon
2. (often plural)
a. a source of strength or power
b. a literary word for muscle
[Old English sionu; related to Old Norse sin, Old Saxon sinewa, Old High German senawa sinew, Lettish pasainis string]
ˈsinewless adj

sin•ew

(ˈsɪn yu)

n.
1. a tendon.
2. Often, sinews. a source of strength, power, or vigor: the sinews of the nation.
3. strength; power; resilience: great moral sinew.
v.t.
4. to strengthen, as with sinews.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English sinu (nominative), sinuwe (genitive), c. Old Frisian sini, Middle Low German, Middle Dutch, Middle High German sene, Old Norse sin]
sin′ew•less, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sinew - a cord or band of inelastic tissue connecting a muscle with its bony attachmentsinew - a cord or band of inelastic tissue connecting a muscle with its bony attachment
connective tissue - tissue of mesodermal origin consisting of e.g. collagen fibroblasts and fatty cells; supports organs and fills spaces between them and forms tendons and ligaments
collagen - a fibrous scleroprotein in bone and cartilage and tendon and other connective tissue; yields gelatin on boiling
muscle system, muscular structure, musculature - the muscular system of an organism
hamstring, hamstring tendon - one of the tendons at the back of the knee
Achilles tendon, tendon of Achilles - a large tendon that runs from the heel to the calf
2.sinew - possessing muscular strength
strength - the property of being physically or mentally strong; "fatigue sapped his strength"

sinew

noun
The state or quality of being physically strong:
Translations
jännejäntevyysvoimavoimanlähde
snagatetiva
erőhajtóerőínizomerőmozgatóerő

sinew

[ˈsɪnjuː] N
1. (= tendon) → tendón m (fig) (= strength) → nervio m, vigor m
2. sinews (= muscles) → músculos mpl

sinew

[ˈsɪnjuː] ntendon m

sinew

n
Sehne f
sinews pl (fig)Kräfte pl, → Stärke f

sinew

[ˈsɪnjuː] n (tendon) → tendine m sinews npl (muscles) → muscoli mpl (fig) (strength) → forza

sin·ew

1. n. tendón;
2. vigoroso, muscular.
References in classic literature ?
As soon as his right arm received thew and sinew he learned to draw the long bow and speed a true arrow.
The power of levying and borrowing money, being the sinew of that which is to be exerted in the national defense, is properly thrown into the same class with it.
Then Theseus bent himself in good earnest to the task, and strained every sinew, with manly strength and resolution.
Teucer had just taken an arrow from his quiver and had laid it upon the bow-string, but Hector struck him with the jagged stone as he was taking aim and drawing the string to his shoulder; he hit him just where the collar-bone divides the neck from the chest, a very deadly place, and broke the sinew of his arm so that his wrist was less, and the bow dropped from his hand as he fell forward on his knees.
A seal did not go very far, for each mouth in the little village had a right to be filled, and neither bone, hide, nor sinew was wasted.
I noticed his hands, dirty, with long nails; they were merely bone and sinew, large and strong; but I had forgotten that they were so shapely.
When Robin was a youth of eighteen, stout of sinew and bold of heart, the Sheriff of Nottingham proclaimed a shooting match and offered a prize of a butt of ale to whosoever should shoot the best shaft in Nottinghamshire.
And by means of that mysterious indefinable bond which maintains throughout an army one and the same temper, known as "the spirit of the army," and which constitutes the sinew of war, Kutuzov's words, his order for a battle next day, immediately became known from one end of the army to the other.
Down I went beneath his ton of maddened, clawing flesh and bone and sinew.
He became quicker of movement than the other dogs, swifter of foot, craftier, deadlier, more lithe, more lean with ironlike muscle and sinew, more enduring, more cruel, more ferocious, and more intelligent.
Six feet at the shoulder stood the frightful mountain of blood-mad flesh and bone and sinew that was bearing down with the speed of an express train upon the seemingly slow-moving man.
I strained a sinew on the day that I slew the three men at Castelnau.