singing


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sing

 (sĭng)
v. sang (săng) or sung (sŭng), sung, sing·ing, sings
v.intr.
1. Music
a. To utter a series of words or sounds in musical tones.
b. To vocalize songs or selections.
c. To perform songs or selections as a trained or professional singer.
d. To produce sounds when played: made the violin sing.
2.
a. To make melodious sounds: birds singing outside the window.
b. To give or have the effect of melody; lilt.
3. To make a high whining, humming, or whistling sound.
4. To be filled with a buzzing or ringing sound.
5.
a. To proclaim or extol something in verse.
b. To write poetry.
6. Slang To give information or evidence against someone.
v.tr.
1. Music
a. To produce the musical sound of: sang a love song.
b. To utter with musical inflections: She sang the message.
c. To bring to a specified state by singing: sang the baby to sleep.
2. To intone or chant (parts of the Mass, for example).
3. To proclaim or extol, especially in verse: sang his praises.
n. Music
A gathering of people for group singing.
Phrasal Verb:
sing out
To call out loudly.

[Middle English singen, from Old English singan; see sengwh- in Indo-European roots.]

sing′a·ble adj.

Singing

 

See Also: MUSIC

  1. As anxious about his voice as a Don Juan about his sexual equipment: a roughness was the equivalent of a dose of clap, laryngitis of impotence —Francis King

    See Also: ANXIETY

  2. Carry a tune as well as a mouse carries an elephant —Anon
  3. His care for his voice was like that of a parent for a sickly and therefore abnormally cherished child —Francis King
  4. Melody … sweetened the air like raindrops —Paul Theroux
  5. Most of them [sopranos] sound like they live on seaweed —Sir Thomas Beecham
  6. Sang in a drone like a far-away tractor —Mary Ward Brown
  7. Sang without passion, like a conscientious schoolgirl —Antonia White
  8. Singing is as natural and common to all men as it is to speak high when they threaten in anger, or to speak low when they are dejected —William Law
  9. Singing voice … like a bee in a bottle, a melodious slightly adenoidal whine, wavering, full of sobs and breaks, and of a pitch like a boy’s before the change of voice —William Humphrey

    See Also: VOICE(S)

  10. Sing like a lark —William Makepeace Thackeray
  11. Sings as sweetly as a nightingale —William Shakespeare
  12. Song … old as air, and dark as doom —Mark Van Doren
  13. Sopranos trilling loudly as if terrorized —Harvey Swados
  14. (I tried to sing along but) the notes themselves kept sliding away from me like water drops dancing across a hot skillet —A. E. Maxwell

    See Also: ELUSIVENESS

  15. [A whistled] tune … seemed to be pouring out of him as though he were a bird —James Baldwin
  16. Tune … that climbed and plummeted like a kite in the wind —Lynne Sharon Schwartz
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Singing - the act of singing vocal musicsinging - the act of singing vocal music  
musical performance - the act of performing music
eisteddfod - any of several annual Welsh festivals involving artistic competitions (especially in singing)
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
vocal music - music that is vocalized (as contrasted with instrumental music)
a capella singing, a cappella singing - singing without instrumental accompaniment
bel canto - a style of operatic singing
coloratura - singing with florid ornamentation
caroling - singing joyful religious songs (especially at Christmas)
crooning - the act of singing popular songs in a sentimental manner
crooning - singing in a soft low tone; "her crooning soon put the child to sleep"
scat, scat singing - singing jazz; the singer substitutes nonsense syllables for the words of the song and tries to sound like a musical instrument
harmonisation, harmonization - singing in harmony
humming - the act of singing with closed lips
chanting, intonation - the act of singing in a monotonous tone
intonation - singing by a soloist of the opening piece of plainsong
karaoke - singing popular songs accompanied by a recording of an orchestra (usually in bars or nightclubs)
part-singing - singing with three or more voice parts
hymnody, psalmody - the act of singing psalms or hymns
singalong, singsong - informal group singing of popular songs
solfege, solfeggio - a voice exercise; singing scales or runs to the same syllable
solfege, solfeggio, solmization - singing using solfa syllables to denote the notes of the scale of C major
yodeling - singing by changing back and forth between the chest voice and a falsetto
Greek chorus, chorus - a company of actors who comment (by speaking or singing in unison) on the action in a classical Greek play
private instructor, tutor, coach - a person who gives private instruction (as in singing, acting, etc.)
2.singing - disclosing information or giving evidence about another
disclosure, revealing, revelation - the speech act of making something evident
Adj.1.singing - smooth and flowing
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
melodic, melodious, musical - containing or constituting or characterized by pleasing melody; "the melodious song of a meadowlark"
Translations
غِناءغِنَاء
zpěv
sang
laulaminen
pjevanje
éneklés
söngur
歌うこと
노래
petje
sång
การร้องเพลง
việc ca hát

singing

[ˈsɪŋɪŋ]
A. N
1. (= act of singing) → canto m
she is studying singingestudia canto
the singing stoppeddejaron de cantar
his singing was atrociouscantaba pésimamente, cantaba fatal
they stood for the singing of the Internationalese pusieron de pie para cantar la Internacional
2. [of kettle] → silbido m; (in ears) → zumbido m
B. CPD singing lesson Nlección f de canto
singing teacher Nprofesor(a) m/f de canto
singing telegram Ntelegrama m cantado
singing voice N to have a good singing voicetener una buena voz para cantar

singing

[ˈsɪŋɪŋ]
n
[person, bird] → chant m
The dancing and singing ended at midnight → Les danses et les chants se terminèrent à minuit.
[kettle] → sifflement m
modif [career] → de chanteur/euse; [competition, lesson, teacher] → de chant
singing voice
She has a lovely singing voice → Elle a une jolie voix.

singing

nSingen nt; (of person, bird also)Gesang m; (in the ears) → Dröhnen nt; (of kettle)Summen nt; he teaches singinger gibt Sing- or Gesangstunden, er gibt Singen (inf); do you like my singing?gefällt dir, wie ich singe?, gefällt dir mein Gesang?

singing

:
singing lesson
nGesangstunde f
singing telegram
n durch eine Agentur persönlich übermittelter, in Gesangsform vorgetragener Geburtstagsgruß etc
singing voice
nSingstimme f

singing

[ˈsɪŋɪŋ]
1. n (of person, bird) → canto; (of kettle, bullet, in ears) → fischio
2. adj (lessons, teacher) → di canto

sing

(siŋ) past tense sang (saŋ) : past participle sung (saŋ) verb
to make (musical sounds) with one's voice. He sings very well; She sang a Scottish song; I could hear the birds singing in the trees.
ˈsinger noun
a person who sings, eg as a profession. Are you a good singer?; He's a trained singer.
ˈsinging noun
the art or activity of making musical sounds with one's voice. Do you do much singing nowadays?; (also adjective) a singing lesson/teacher.
sing out
to shout or call out. Sing out when you're ready to go.

Singing

غِنَاء zpěv sang Singen τραγούδι canto laulaminen chant pjevanje canto 歌うこと 노래 zingen sang śpiew canto пение sång การร้องเพลง şarkı söyleme việc ca hát 唱歌
References in classic literature ?
The first sound in the morning was her voice as she went about the house singing like a lark, and the last sound at night was the same cheery sound, for the girls never grew too old for that familiar lullaby.
Upon the weeds the bees were gathered in armies, singing as they worked.
Through the jungle came a faint sound of singing --not a harmonious air, but the somewhat barbaric chant of the natives.
There in the sheltered draw-bottom the wind did not blow very hard, but I could hear it singing its humming tune up on the level, and I could see the tall grasses wave.
Only the birds that darted here and there from hedges were awake, and singing their matins.
Then, without circumlocution or apology, first pronounced the word "Standish," and placing the unknown engine, already described, to his mouth, from which he drew a high, shrill sound, that was followed by an octave below, from his own voice, he commenced singing the following words, in full, sweet, and melodious tones, that set the music, the poetry, and even the uneasy motion of his ill- trained beast at defiance; "How good it is, O see, And how it pleaseth well, Together e'en in unity, For brethren so to dwell.
Maryland Joe, his brother, told better stories (sometimes of Dick), though not so good a mimic as the other Kearney, who had a fairly sympathetic voice in singing.
Therefore, it was well that Phoebe so often chose sad themes, and not amiss that they ceased to be so sad while she was singing them.
The child went singing away, following up the current of the brook, and striving to mingle a more lightsome cadence with its melancholy voice.
It was a pity that I needed once more to describe the portentous little activity by which she sought to divert my attention--the perceptible increase of movement, the greater intensity of play, the singing, the gabbling of nonsense, and the invitation to romp.
He now took off his hat --a new beaver hat --when I came nigh singing out with fresh surprise.
The richly dressed actresses and actors tripped about singing bravely and pretending not to mind it.