singleness


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Related to singleness: singleness of purpose

sin·gle

 (sĭng′gəl)
adj.
1. Not accompanied by another or others; solitary.
2.
a. Consisting of one part, aspect, or section: a single thickness; a single serving.
b. Having the same application for all; uniform: a single moral code for all.
c. Consisting of one in number: She had but a single thought, which was to escape.
3. Not divided; unbroken: a single slab of ice.
4.
a. Separate from others; individual and distinct: Every single child will receive a gift.
b. Having individual opponents; involving two individuals only: single combat.
5.
a. Honest; undisguised: a single adoration.
b. Wholly attentive: You must judge the contest with a single eye.
6. Designed to accommodate one person or thing: a single bed.
7.
a. Not married or involved in a romantic relationship: Once he knew she was single, he asked her to go out.
b. Relating to a state of being unmarried or uninvolved in a romantic relationship: enjoys the single life.
8. Botany Having only one rank or row of petals: a single flower.
n.
1. One that is separate and individual.
2. Something capable of carrying, moving, or holding one person or thing at a time, as a bed or a hotel room.
3.
a. A person who is not married or involved in a romantic relationship.
b. singles Such persons considered as a group: a bar for singles.
4. A one-dollar bill.
5.
a. A phonograph record, especially a forty-five, having one song on each side.
b. A song on one of these sides.
c. A song, often from a full-length album or compact disc, that is released for airplay.
6. Baseball A hit enabling the batter to reach first base. Also called one-bagger, one-base hit.
7. Sports
a. A hit for one run in cricket.
b. A golf match between two players.
c. often singles A tennis or badminton match between two players.
d. singles A competition in which individuals compete against each other, as in rowing or figure skating.
v. sin·gled, sin·gling, sin·gles
v.tr.
Baseball
a. To cause (a base runner) to score or advance by hitting a single: singled him to second.
b. To cause the scoring of (a run) by hitting a single.
v.intr. Baseball
To hit a single.
Phrasal Verb:
single out
To choose or distinguish from others: We singled her out from the list of applicants.

[Middle English sengle, from Old French, from Latin singulus; see sem- in Indo-European roots.]

sin′gle·ness n.

sin•gle•ness

(ˈsɪŋ gəl nɪs)

n.
the state or quality of being single.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.singleness - without hypocrisy; "the singleness of his motives could not be questioned"
sincerity - the quality of being open and truthful; not deceitful or hypocritical; "his sincerity inspired belief"; "they demanded some proof of my sincerity"
2.singleness - the quality of concentrating on one central objective; "his singleness of purpose"
assiduity, assiduousness, concentration - great and constant diligence and attention

singleness

noun
1. The quality or state of being alone:
2. The condition of being one:
3. The quality or condition of being unique:
Translations
عُزوبِيَّه، إنْفِرادِيَّه
jedinečnost
det at være ugift
páratlanság
stefnufesta
bekârlık

singleness

[ˈsɪŋglnɪs] N singleness of purposeresolución f, firmeza f

singleness

n singleness of purposeZielstrebigkeit f; his singleness of purpose caused him to neglect his familyer ging so vollkommen in der Sache auf, dass er seine Familie vernachlässigte

singleness

[ˈsɪŋglnɪs] n singleness of purposetenacia

single

(ˈsiŋgl) adjective
1. one only. The spider hung on a single thread.
2. for one person only. a single bed/mattress.
3. unmarried. a single person.
4. for or in one direction only. a single ticket/journey/fare.
noun
1. a gramophone record with only one tune or song on each side. This group have just brought out a new single.
2. a one-way ticket.
ˈsingleness noun
ˈsingles noun plural
1. (also noun singular) in tennis etc, a match or matches with only one player on each side. The men's singles are being played this week; (also adjective) a singles match.
2. (especially American) unmarried (usually young) people. a bar for singles; (also adjective) a singles holiday/club.
ˈsingly adverb
one by one; separately. They came all together, but they left singly.
ˌsingle-ˈbreasted adjective
(of a coat, jacket etc) having only one row of buttons. a single-breasted tweed suit.
ˌsingle-ˈdecker noun, adjective
(a bus etc) having only one deck or level. a single-decker (bus).
ˌsingle-ˈhanded adjective, adverb
working etc by oneself, without help. He runs the restaurant single-handed; single-handed efforts.
single ˈparent noun
a mother or father who brings up a child or children on her or his own. a single-parent family.
single out
to choose or pick out for special treatment. He was singled out to receive special thanks for his help.
References in classic literature ?
When he realised that Lady Arabella was bound for the Castle, he devoted himself to following her with singleness of purpose.
But those who take an interest in this tale, will be glad to learn that the BROTHERS CHEERYBLE live; that their liberal charity, their singleness of heart, their noble nature, and their unbounded benevolence, are no creations of the Author's brain; but are prompting every day (and oftenest by stealth) some munificent and generous deed in that town of which they are the pride and honour.
It is not an extravagant theory that the cabby's singleness of purpose and concentrated view of life are the results of the hansom's peculiar construction.
Seeing, or fancying, that I was suspected of an intention of carrying poison to him, I asked to be searched before I sat down at his bedside, and told the officer who was always there, that I was willing to do anything that would assure him of the singleness of my designs.
Difference of object does not alter singleness of passion.
That Lady Russell, of steady age and character, and extremely well provided for, should have no thought of a second marriage, needs no apology to the public, which is rather apt to be unreasonably discontented when a woman does marry again, than when she does not; but Sir Walter's continuing in singleness requires explanation.
Your devotion to Lucille, or rather the singleness of your devotion to Lucille," she remarked, "is positively the most gauche thing about you.
But if the whole population had had him in their minds, and had wished his life to be spared, not one among them could have done so with a purer zeal or greater singleness of heart than the good locksmith.
Within the limits of his short tether he had tumbled about, annihilating the flowers of existence with greater singleness of purpose than many of the blatant personages whose company he kept.
He pictured to himself the anxious projector of the enterprise, who had disbursed so munificently in its outfit, calculating on the zeal, fidelity, and singleness of purpose of his associates and agents; while they, on the other hand, having a good ship at their disposal and a deep pocket at home to bear them out, seemed ready to loiter on every coast, and amuse themselves in every port.
For only a moment did Ghek tarry by the river, for his seemingly aimless wanderings were in reality prompted by a definite purpose, and this he pursued with vigor and singleness of design.
As a result, he concentrated with a similar singleness of purpose, greedily snapping up the hints and suggestions thrown out by his working mate.