singsong


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sing·song

 (sĭng′sông′, -sŏng′)
n.
1. Verse characterized by mechanical regularity of rhythm and rhyme.
2. A tediously repetitive rising and falling inflection of the voice.
adj.
Tediously repetitive in vocal inflection or rhythm.

sing′song′y adj.

singsong

(ˈsɪŋˌsɒŋ)
n
1. (Linguistics) an accent, metre, or intonation that is characterized by an alternately rising and falling rhythm, as in a person's voice, piece of verse, etc
2. (Music, other) Brit an informal session of singing, esp of popular or traditional songs
adj
having a regular or monotonous rising and falling rhythm: a singsong accent.

sing•song

(ˈsɪŋˌsɔŋ, -ˌsɒŋ)

n.
1. a monotonous, rhythmical rising and falling in pitch of the voice when speaking.
2. verse, or a piece of verse, that is monotonously jingly in rhythm and pattern of pitch.
3. Brit. a session of informal group singing; sing.
adj.
4. monotonous in rhythm and in pitch.
[1600–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.singsong - a regular and monotonous rising and falling intonation
intonation, pitch contour, modulation - rise and fall of the voice pitch
2.singsong - informal group singing of popular songs
singing, vocalizing - the act of singing vocal music
Verb1.singsong - speak, chant, or declaim in a singsong
cantillate, chant, intonate, intone - recite with musical intonation; recite as a chant or a psalm; "The rabbi chanted a prayer"
2.singsong - move as if accompanied by a singsong; "The porters singsonged the travellers' luggage up the mountain"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
Adj.1.singsong - uttered in a monotonous cadence or rhythm as in chanting; "their chantlike intoned prayers"; "a singsong manner of speaking"
rhythmic, rhythmical - recurring with measured regularity; "the rhythmic chiming of church bells"- John Galsworthy; "rhythmical prose"
Translations

singsong

[ˈsɪŋˌsɒŋ]
A. ADJ [voice, tone] → cantarín
B. N (Brit) (= songs) → concierto m improvisado; (= sound) → sonsonete m
to get together for a singsongreunirse para cantar (canciones populares, folklóricas etc)

singsong

adj the singsong Welsh accentder walisische Singsang; in his singsong voicemit or in seinem Singsang
nLiedersingen nt no indef art, no pl; we often have a singsong after a few drinksnachdem wir etwas getrunken haben, singen wir oft zusammen

singsong

[ˈsɪŋˌsɒŋ]
1. adj (tone) → cantilenante
2. n (Brit) (fam) to have a singsongfarsi una cantata
References in classic literature ?
There was no sound but the high, singsong buzz of wild bees and the sunny gurgle of the water underneath.
Father Wolf listened, and below in the valley that ran down to a little river he heard the dry, angry, snarly, singsong whine of a tiger who has caught nothing and does not care if all the jungle knows it.
Now and again he heard the singsong cadence of a Chinese quotation.
The sound of a clear, high voice in a monotonous singsong now rang out behind him and came across the water with a distinctness that pierced and subdued all other sounds, even the beating of the ripples in his ears.
She commenced calling in a low singsong voice that was half purr.
The recluse did not reply, but began to mumble with a singsong irritated, mocking intonation: "Daughter of Egypt
The art of his reading was supposed to lie in rolling out the words, quite independently of their meaning, in a loud and singsong voice alternating between a despairing wail and a tender murmur, so that the wail fell quite at random on one word and the murmur on another.
He heard her calling to the banths in a low, singsong voice that was half purr.
So we crept along at a snail's pace, with much stumbling and falling--the guards keeping up a singsong chant ahead of us, interspersed with certain high notes which I found always indicated rough places and turns.
For a moment Tarzan thought that by some strange freak of fate a miracle had saved him, but when he realized the ease with which the girl had, single-handed, beaten off twenty gorilla-like males, and an instant later, as he saw them again take up their dance about him while she addressed them in a singsong monotone, which bore every evidence of rote, he came to the conclusion that it was all but a part of the ceremony of which he was the central figure.
cried Dame Eliza, in a singsong heedless voice, which showed that such bickerings were nightly things among her guests.
Seriously, You Have to Eat retains the chuckle-inducing sense of parental frustration in its singsong rhymes and colorful illustrations.