sinking


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Related to sinking: sinking fund

sink

 (sĭngk)
v. sank (săngk) or sunk (sŭngk), sunk, sink·ing, sinks
v.intr.
1.
a. To go below the surface of water or another liquid: We watched the leaky inner tube slowly sink.
b. To descend to the bottom of a body of water or other liquid: found the wreck where it had sunk.
2.
a. To fall or drop to a lower level, especially to go down slowly or in stages: The water in the lake sank several feet during the long, dry summer.
b. To subside or settle gradually: Cracks developed as the building sank.
3. To appear to move downward, as the sun or moon in setting.
4. To slope downward; incline: The road sinks as it approaches the stream.
5.
a. To fall or lower oneself slowly, as from weakness or fatigue: The exhausted runner sank to the ground.
b. To feel great disappointment or discouragement: Her heart sank within her.
6.
a. To pass into something; penetrate: The claws sank into the flesh of the prey.
b. To steep or soak: The wine has sunk into my shirt.
7. To pass into a specified condition: She sank into a deep sleep.
8.
a. To deteriorate in quality or condition: The patient is sinking fast. The family sank into a state of disgrace.
b. To diminish, as in value: Gold prices are sinking.
9. To become weaker, quieter, or less forceful: His voice sank to a whisper.
10. To make an impression; become felt or understood: The meaning finally sank in.
v.tr.
1. To cause to descend beneath the surface or to the bottom of a liquid: sink a ship.
2.
a. To cause to penetrate deeply: He sank his sword into the dragon's belly.
b. To force into the ground: sink a piling.
c. To dig or drill (a mine or well) in the earth.
d. To cause to drop or lower: sank the bucket into the well.
e. Sports To propel (a ball or shot) into a hole, basket, or pocket.
3. To cause to be engrossed: "Frank sank himself in another book" (Patricia Highsmith).
4.
a. To make weaker, quieter, or less forceful: She sank her voice when the manager walked by.
b. To reduce in quantity or worth: The bad news will sink markets around the world.
5. To debase the nature of; degrade: The scandal has sunk him in the eyes of many.
6. To bring to a low or ruined state; defeat or destroy: Loss of advertising sank the newspaper.
7. To suppress or hide: He sank his arrogance and apologized.
8. Informal To defeat, as in a game.
9. To invest or spend, often without getting a return or adequate value: I've sunk a lot of money into that car.
10. To pay off (a debt).
n.
1. A water basin fixed to a wall or floor and having a drainpipe and generally a piped supply of water.
2. A cesspool.
3. A sinkhole.
4. A natural or artificial means of absorbing or removing a substance or a form of energy from a system.
5. A place regarded as wicked and corrupt: That city is a sink of corruption.
Idioms:
sink (one's) teeth into Informal
To undertake an endeavor energetically: She sank her teeth into the challenging project.
sink or swim Informal
To fail or succeed without alternative.

[Middle English sinken, from Old English sincan.]

sink′a·ble adj.

sinking

(ˈsɪŋkɪŋ)
n
a. a feeling in the stomach caused by hunger or uneasiness
b. (as modifier): a sinking feeling.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sinking - a descent as through liquid (especially through water)sinking - a descent as through liquid (especially through water); "they still talk about the sinking of the Titanic"
settling, subsiding, subsidence - a gradual sinking to a lower level
descent - a movement downward
immersion, submergence, submerging, submersion - sinking until covered completely with water
foundering, going under - (of a ship) sinking
2.sinking - a slow fall or decline (as for lack of strength); "after several hours of sinking an unexpected rally rescued the market"; "he could not control the sinking of his legs"
decrease, lessening, drop-off - a change downward; "there was a decrease in his temperature as the fever subsided"; "there was a sharp drop-off in sales"
3.sinking - a feeling caused by uneasiness or apprehension; "with a sinking heart"; "a sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach"
anxiety - a vague unpleasant emotion that is experienced in anticipation of some (usually ill-defined) misfortune
Translations

sinking

[ˈsɪŋkɪŋ]
A. N (= shipwreck) → hundimiento m
B. ADJ
1. (= foundering) a sinking ship (lit) → un barco que se hunde (fig) (= cause) → una causa en declive or que va a pique; (= organization) → una organización en declive or que va a pique
2. with a sinking feeling she picked the phone upcon una sensación de ansiedad contestó el teléfono
that sinking feelingesa sensación de ansiedad or desazón
with a sinking heartentristecido
3. (Fin) a sinking pound/dollaruna libra/un dólar cayendo en picado
C. CPD sinking fund N (Fin) → fondo m de amortización

sinking

[ˈsɪŋkɪŋ]
n [ship] → naufrage m
the sinking of the Titanic → le naufrage du Titanic
adj
a sinking feeling → un serrement de cœur
to get that sinking feeling → avoir le cœur serrésinking fund n (FINANCE)fonds mpl d'amortissementsink unit nbloc-évier m

sinking

n (of ship)Untergang m; (deliberately) → Versenkung f; (of shaft)Senken nt, → Abteufen nt (spec); (of well)Bohren nt
adj (Fin) currencyfallend; a sinking ship (lit, fig)ein sinkendes Schiff; with (a) sinking heartschweren Herzens; he realized with a sinking heart that …das Herz wurde ihm schwer, als er merkte, dass …; sinking feelingflaues Gefühl (im Magen) (inf); I got a horrible sinking feeling when I realized …mir wurde ganz anders, als ich erkannte

sinking

[ˈsɪŋkɪŋ]
1. n (shipwreck) → naufragio
2. adj a or that sinking feelinguna stretta allo stomaco
I have a sinking feeling that things have gone wrong → ho il brutto presentimento che le cose siano andate male
with sinking heart → con la morte nel cuore
References in classic literature ?
sighed Jo, sinking into the depth of a velour chair and gazing about her with an air of intense satisfaction.
Search for the precious map was given up for the time being, and the professor and his friends set the natives to work digging shafts in the ground, as though sinking them down to the level of the buried city.
It was an October afternoon; the sun was just sinking.
Their rifles made a common report, when, sinking on his wounded limb, part of the body of the savage came into view.
It was wonderful, the vast variety of forms into which she threw her intellect, with no continuity, indeed, but darting' up and dancing, always in a state of preternatural activity -- soon sinking down, as if exhausted by so rapid and feverish a tide of life -- and succeeded by other shapes of a similar wild energy.
Tormented, in the hall, with difficulties and obstacles, I remember sinking down at the foot of the staircase--suddenly collapsing there on the lowest step and then, with a revulsion, recalling that it was exactly where more than a month before, in the darkness of night and just so bowed with evil things, I had seen the specter of the most horrible of women.
The fire hissed in the waves; the same instant the ship shot by the bubble the sinking pipe made.
Almost in the same instant, with a thunder-boom, the enormous mass dropped into the sea, like Niagara's Table-Rock into the whirlpool; the suddenly relieved hull rolled away from it, to far down her glittering copper; and all caught their breath, as half swinging --now over the sailors' heads, and now over the water --Daggoo, through a thick mist of spray, was dimly beheld clinging to the pendulous tackles, while poor, buried-alive Tashtego was sinking utterly down to the bottom of the sea
I felt him stagger with the shock, though he uttered no cry; I tried to check my speed, but the sword dropped from his right hand, the rein fell loose from the left, and sinking backward from the saddle he fell to the earth; the other riders swept past us, and by the force of their charge I was driven from the spot.
Then, with a horrible sinking of the heart, Teta Elzbieta unlocked her bureau and brought out the paper that had already caused them so many agonies.
At first, the novelty and alarm kept him waking; but his mother so hurriedly repressed every breath or sound, and so assured him that if he were only still she would certainly save him, that he clung quietly round her neck, only asking, as he found himself sinking to sleep,
I felt a mournful sinking at the heart, and muttered: "I shall never see my friends again -- never, never again.