sinusoidal projection


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Related to sinusoidal projection: Mollweide projection
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sinusoidal projection

sinusoidal projection

n.
An equal-area map projection in which parallels and the prime meridian are straight lines and the other meridians are increasingly curved outward from the prime meridian.

sinusoidal projection

n
(Physical Geography) an equal-area map projection on which all parallels are straight lines and all except the prime meridian are sine curves, often used to show tropical latitudes. Also called: Sanson-Flamsteed projection

sinusoi′dal projec`tion


n.
an equal-area projection with straight parallels spaced at regular intervals and curved meridians symmetrical to a straight central meridian that is half as long as the equator.
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sinusoidal projection

si·nu·soi·dal projection

(sī′nə-soid′l)
A method of making a flat map of the Earth so that the parallels and the prime meridians are straight lines and the other meridians are curved outward from the prime meridian. Compare conic projection, homolosine projection, Mercator projection.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sinusoidal projection - an equal-area map projection showing parallels and the equator as straight lines and other meridians as curvedsinusoidal projection - an equal-area map projection showing parallels and the equator as straight lines and other meridians as curved; used to map tropical latitudes
equal-area map projection, equal-area projection - a map projection in which quadrilaterals formed by meridians and parallels have an area on the map proportional to their area on the globe
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, the pointed poles of the sinusoidal projection add considerable angular distortion to polar areas, while projections with a polar line, such as the Robinson projection, introduce less shape distortion at poles.
This gives the equations of the pseudo-cylindrical, equal-area sinusoidal projection, known also as the Mercator-Sanson projection (Mayr 1964; Snyder and Voxland 1989; Richardus and Adler 1972), in Figure 3a:
an image captured from a satellite can be rectified to a projected plane such as a sinusoidal projection surface.
In one case, we could project global land cover data to the sinusoidal projection with a 1-, 16-, or 25-km output pixel size, but not with 4- or 8-km pixels.
This implies that the appearance of the DLDM and the predictive equations for the sinusoidal projection will be fundamentally different.
For example, the sinusoidal projection has the geometric property of equal area, and so any area on the map accurately reflects the same relative area on the globe.
Imagine) and some original programming for the Goode homolosine projection (unavailable in commercial software at the time of this research), the 12 quadrilaterals were projected to four global projections using a standard parallel and central meridian of zero degrees: Lambert's equal-area cylindrical, Mollweide, Robinson, and the Goode homolosine (which is a combination of the sinusoidal projection at latitudes below 40 [degrees] 40' and the Mollweide projection at higher latitudes) interrupted by oceans.