sit down


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sit

 (sĭt)
v. sat (săt), sit·ting, sits
v.intr.
1. To rest with the torso vertical and the body supported on the buttocks.
2.
a. To rest with the hindquarters lowered onto a supporting surface. Used of animals.
b. To perch. Used of birds.
3. To cover eggs for hatching; brood.
4. To be situated or located: a house that sits on a hill.
5. To lie or rest: Dishes were sitting on a shelf. See Usage Note at set1.
6. To pose for an artist or photographer.
7.
a. To occupy a seat as a member of a body of officials: sit in Congress.
b. To be in session.
8. To remain inactive or unused: Her expensive skis sat gathering dust.
9. To affect one with or as if with a burden; weigh: Official duties sat heavily upon the governor.
10. To fit, fall, or drape in a specified manner: The jacket sits perfectly on you.
11. To be agreeable to one; please: The idea didn't sit well with any of us.
12. Chiefly British To take an examination, as for a degree.
13. To blow from a particular direction. Used of the wind.
14. To keep watch or take care of a child.
v.tr.
1. To cause to sit; seat: Sit yourself over there.
2. To keep one's seat on (an animal): She sits her horse well.
3. To sit on (eggs) for the purpose of hatching.
4. To provide seating accommodation for: a theater that sits 1,000 people.
n.
1.
a. The act of sitting.
b. A period of time spent sitting.
2. The way in which an article of clothing, such as a dress or jacket, fits.
Phrasal Verbs:
sit down
To take a seat.
sit in
1. To be present or participate as a visitor at a discussion or music session.
2. To act as a substitute: She sat in for the vacationing news anchor.
3. To take part in a sit-in.
sit on (or upon)
1. To confer about.
2. To suppress or repress: sat on the evidence.
3. To postpone action or resolution regarding.
4. Slang To rebuke sharply; reprimand.
sit out
1. To stay until the end of.
2. To refrain from taking part in: sit out a dance.
sit up
1. To rise from lying down to a sitting position.
2. To sit with the spine erect.
3. To stay up later than the customary bedtime.
4. To become suddenly alert: The students sat up when he mentioned the test.
Idioms:
sit on (one's) hands
To fail to act.
sit pretty Informal
To be in a very favorable position.
sit tight Informal
To be patient and await the next move.

[Middle English sitten, from Old English sittan; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

sit down

vb (adverb)
1. to adopt or cause (oneself or another) to adopt a sitting posture
2. (foll by: under) to suffer (insults, etc) without protests or resistance
n
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an instance of sitting down
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a form of civil disobedience in which demonstrators sit down in a public place as a protest or to draw attention to a cause
5. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) See sit-down strike
adj
(Cookery) (of a meal, etc) eaten while sitting down at a table
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.sit down - take a seat
sit, sit down - be seated
change posture - undergo a change in bodily posture
get up, stand up, rise, arise, uprise - rise to one's feet; "The audience got up and applauded"
2.sit down - show to a seat; assign a seat for; "The host seated me next to Mrs. Smith"
lay, place, put, set, position, pose - put into a certain place or abstract location; "Put your things here"; "Set the tray down"; "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children"; "Place emphasis on a certain point"
sit, sit down - be seated
reseat - show to a different seat; "The usher insisted on reseating us"
3.sit down - be seated
lounge - sit or recline comfortably; "He was lounging on the sofa"
sprawl - sit or lie with one's limbs spread out
perch, roost, rest - sit, as on a branch; "The birds perched high in the tree"
seat, sit down, sit - show to a seat; assign a seat for; "The host seated me next to Mrs. Smith"
hunker, hunker down, scrunch up, squat, scrunch, crouch - sit on one's heels; "In some cultures, the women give birth while squatting"; "The children hunkered down to protect themselves from the sandstorm"
sit down, sit - take a seat
Translations
يَجْلِسيَجْلِسُ
posaditposadit se
sætte sig
istuutua
sjesti
leül
setjast
着席する
자리에 앉다
consido
posadiť
sesti
sitta ner
นั่งลง
ngồi xuống

w>sit down

vi
(lit)sich (hin)setzen; to sit down in a chairsich auf einen Stuhl setzen
(fig) to take something sitting downetw einfach hinnehmen

sit

(sit) present participle sitting: past tense, past participle sat (sӕt) verb
1. to (cause to) rest on the buttocks; to (cause to) be seated. He likes sitting on the floor; They sat me in the chair and started asking questions.
2. to lie or rest; to have a certain position. The parcel is sitting on the table.
3. (with on) to be an official member of (a board, committee etc). He sat on several committees.
4. (of birds) to perch. An owl was sitting in the tree by the window.
5. to undergo (an examination).
6. to take up a position, or act as a model, in order to have one's picture painted or one's photograph taken. She is sitting for a portrait/photograph.
7. (of a committee, parliament etc) to be in session. Parliament sits from now until Christmas.
ˈsitter noun
1. a person who poses for a portrait etc.
2. a baby-sitter.
ˈsitting noun
a period of continuous action, meeting etc. I read the whole book at one sitting; The committee were prepared for a lengthy sitting.
ˈsit-in noun
an occupation of a building etc by protesters. The students staged a sit-in.
ˈsitting-room noun
a room used mainly for sitting in.
sitting target, sitting duck
someone or something that is in an obvious position to be attacked. If they're reducing staff, he's a sitting target.
sit back
to rest and take no part in an activity. He just sat back and let it all happen.
sit down
to (cause to) take a seat, take a sitting position. Let's sit down over here; He sat the child down on the floor.
sit out
1. to remain seated during a dance. Let's sit (this one) out.
2. to remain inactive and wait until the end of. They'll try to sit out the crisis.
sit tight
to keep the same position or be unwilling to move or act. The best thing to do is to sit tight and see if things improve.
sit up
1. to rise to a sitting position. Can the patient sit up?
2. to remain awake, not going to bed. I sat up until 3 a.m. waiting for you!

sit down

يَجْلِسُ posadit se sætte sig hinsetzen (sich) κάθομαι tomar asiento istuutua s’asseoir sjesti sedersi 着席する 자리에 앉다 gaan zitten sitte ned usiąść sentar-se сесть sitta ner นั่งลง oturmak ngồi xuống 坐下
References in classic literature ?
It was a hard and a cold bed; nor was I suffered to sleep without interruption; for some one would be always coming in from deck to get a dram, and when a fresh watch was to be set, two and sometimes all three would sit down and brew a bowl together.
When you arrived here did you not sit down on the ground?
But the young man refused to do it: so the fox said, 'I will at any rate give you good counsel: beware of two things; ransom no one from the gallows, and sit down by the side of no river.
When you come home you sit down in a sober, contemplative, not uncharitable frame of mind, and apply yourself to your books or your business.
He wanted to explore its borders, but concluded that it would be best to sit down and rest awhile, first.
Unfortunately, my slight tendency to rheumatism makes me afraid of damp: I'll sit down in your comfortable kitchen.
Or, if she were in a very sedate and serious state of mind, she would sit down with the tablets, and a little basket of bills and other documents, which looked more like curl-papers than anything else, and endeavour to get some result out of them.
Let us sit down," said Kennedy, "and talk without excitement.
The old man, never bidden to sit down, stood with an earnest hand laid on the back of the young man's easy chair.
Sit down and dry yourself, and speak straight forrard.
But Dorothy did not know this, nor could she get away from the bright red flowers that were everywhere about; so presently her eyes grew heavy and she felt she must sit down to rest and to sleep.
A vast number of polite speeches were exchanged, and at length, taking Don Quixote between them, they proceeded to sit down to table.