skeg

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skeg

 (skĕg)
n.
1. A timber that connects the keel and sternpost of a ship.
2. An arm extending to the rear of the keel to support the rudder and protect the propeller.
3. A fin projecting from the bottom of an outboard motor, used to protect the propeller and to provide extra steering control.
4. A centerboard mounted near the stern of a kayak, used to improve directional stability in windy weather.
5. A fin mounted near the tail of a surfboard, used to improve directional stability.

[Dutch scheg, perhaps from Old Norse skegg, beard, beak of a ship.]

skeg

or

skegg

n
1. (Nautical Terms) a reinforcing brace between the after end of a keel and the rudderpost
2. (Nautical Terms) a support at the bottom of a rudder
3. (Nautical Terms) a projection from the forefoot of a vessel for towing paravanes
4. (Nautical Terms) any short keel-like projection at the stern of a boat
5. (Nautical Terms) Austral a rear fin on the underside of a surfboard
[C16: of Scandinavian origin; compare Icelandic skegg cutwater]

skeg

(skɛg)

n.
1. a projection supporting a rudder at its lower end.
2. an extension of the keel of a small craft, designed to improve steering.
[1590–1600; < Dutch scheg cutwater]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.skeg - a brace that extends from the rear of the keel to support the rudderpost
brace - a support that steadies or strengthens something else; "he wore a brace on his knee"
after part, stern, poop, tail, quarter - the rear part of a ship
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In comparison to conventional twin-shaft propulsion systems, the new system enables less appendages for propulsion systems such as skegs, shaft brackets and rudders and reduces water resistance, and improves energy-saving efficiency by allowing the use of only fuel-efficient low-speed diesel power in bays and channels where slower navigation speeds are required.
When it's out of the water you need to check the skegs, all the through-hull fittings, the shaft seals on the shaft from the engine to the propeller as there can be movement there or the shafts start to close up, or there might not be enough lubrication.
At a later stage, he also got a view of the bottom of the craft, which were being repaired on land, revealing how the propeller was protected in a tunnel, and how the bottom had two skegs, stabilizing it.