skein


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skein

 (skān)
n.
1.
a. A length of thread or yarn wound in a loose long coil.
b. Something suggesting the coil of a skein; a complex tangle: a twisted skein of lies.
2. A flock of geese or similar birds in flight.

[Middle English skeine, from Old French escaigne.]

skein

(skeɪn)
n
1. (Knitting & Sewing) a length of yarn, etc, wound in a long coil
2. something resembling this, such as a lock of hair
3. (Zoology) a flock of geese flying. Compare gaggle2
[C15: from Old French escaigne, of unknown origin]

skein

(skeɪn)

n.
1. a length of yarn or thread wound on a reel or swift preparatory for use in manufacturing.
2.
a. a loose coil of thread or yarn in a package for retail sale.
b. anything wound in or resembling such a coil: a skein of hair.
3. something suggestive of the twistings of a skein.
4. a flock of geese, ducks, or the like, in flight.
5. a succession or series of similar or interrelated things: a skein of tennis victories.
[1300–50; Middle English < Middle French escaigne, of obscure orig.]

Skein

 a flight of wild fowl, duck, or geese; a quantity of yarn; thread or silk taken from the reel.
Examples: skein of geese (in flight)—Brewer; of wild geese, 1851; of human affairs, 1797; of shadowy hair, 1874; of policy, 1884; of state politics 1831; of silk, 1628; of thread, 1440; of wool; of worsted, 1704

Skein

The iron (or steel) conical-shaped part that fits over the end of the wooden wagon axle and acts as a bearing for the wheel.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.skein - coils of worsted yarnskein - coils of worsted yarn    
hank - a coil of rope or wool or yarn

skein

noun
1. Something that is intricately and often bewilderingly complex:
2. Something that suggests the continuousness of a fine continuous filament:
Translations
dukkefed
vyyhti

skein

[skeɪn] Nmadeja f
a tangled skein (fig) → un asunto enmarañado

skein

[ˈskeɪn] n [thread, wool] → écheveau m

skein

n (of wool etc)Strang m; (of geese)Schwarm m; (of evidence, lies etc)Geflecht nt

skein

[skeɪn] n (of wool) → matassa
References in classic literature ?
Only after emptying a bottle or two did he feel dimly that the terribly tangled skein of life which previously had terrified him was not as dreadful as he had thought.
Bring with you a skein of silk every time that you come, and I will weave a ladder with it, and when that is ready I will descend, and you will take me on your horse.
He told us he was aware of the efforts young Rouletabille was making to unravel the tangled skein of The Yellow Room mystery.
It may be of some interest, or it may be trivial, in such a tangled skein as we are trying to unravel.
My attention was now called off by Miss Smith desiring me to hold a skein of thread: while she was winding it, she talked to me from time to time, asking whether I had ever been at school before, whether I could mark, stitch, knit, &c.
Of her lips I say nothing, for they are so fine and thin that, if lips might be reeled, one might make a skein of them; but being of a different colour from ordinary lips they are wonderful, for they are mottled, blue, green, and purple- let my lord the governor pardon me for painting so minutely the charms of her who some time or other will be my daughter; for I love her, and I don't find her amiss.
They both glanced at the subject of this remark, who had taken a seat on the other side of the fire, and, smiling vacantly, was making puzzles on his fingers with a skein of string.
Thus, in a prolix, gently-growling, foolish way, did Plornish turn the tangled skein of his estate about and about, like a blind man who was trying to find some beginning or end to it; until they reached the prison gate.
There's the scarlet thread of murder running through the colourless skein of life, and our duty is to unravel it, and isolate it, and expose every inch of it.
Tim gathers up a skein of it and surveys the last few feet, which record "162's" path through the volt-flurry.
A little girl, sent by her mother to match a skein of cotton thread, of a peculiar hue, took one that the near-sighted old lady pronounced extremely like, but soon came running back, with a blunt and cross message, that it would not do, and, besides, was very rotten
The poor dame, very much infatuated with her daughter, like any other silly mother, did not perceive the officer's lack of enthusiasm, and strove in low tones to call his attention to the infinite grace with which Fleur-de-Lys used her needle or wound her skein.