skiff


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skiff

 (skĭf)
n.
A flatbottom open boat of shallow draft, having a pointed bow and a square stern and propelled by oars, sail, or motor.

[Middle English skif, from Old French esquif, from Old Italian schifo, of Germanic origin.]

skiff

(skɪf)
n
(Nautical Terms) any of various small boats propelled by oars, sail, or motor
[C18: from French esquif, from Old Italian schifo a boat, of Germanic origin; related to Old High German schif ship]

skiff

(skɪf)

n.
any of various types of boats small enough for sailing or rowing by one person.
[1565–75; (< Middle French esquif) < Italian schifo < Langobardic; compare Old High German scif ship]
skiff′less, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.skiff - any of various small boats propelled by oars or by sails or by a motorskiff - any of various small boats propelled by oars or by sails or by a motor
sampan - an Asian skiff usually propelled by two oars
small boat - a boat that is small
Translations

skiff

[skɪf] Nesquife m

skiff

[ˈskɪf] n (= boat) → skiff m

skiff

nSkiff nt; (Sport) → Einer m

skiff

[skɪf] n (boat) → skiff m inv
References in classic literature ?
And all the while the thick-lipped leviathan is rushing through the deep, leaving tons of tumultuous white curds in his wake, and causing the slight boat to rock in the swells like a skiff caught nigh the paddle-wheels of an ocean steamer.
I was thinking of going by skiff to the next town, Necharsteinach; so I ran to the riverside in advance of the party and asked a man there if he had a boat to hire.
So we unhitched a skiff and pulled down the river two mile and a half, to the big scar on the hillside, and went ashore.
The day's fishing finished, they came floating downstream in their skiff, talking national politics and other high matters, and presently met a skiff coming up from town, with a man in it who said:
One glance, however, was sufficient; and it was only one glance that I durst take from that unsteady skiff.
They then lay to, and lowering a skiff or boat, as many as a dozen Frenchmen, well armed with match-locks, and their matches burning, got into it and came alongside; and seeing how few we were, and that our vessel was going down, they took us in, telling us that this had come to us through our incivility in not giving them an answer.
I saw their spiral-shaped and fluted shells, which Cuvier justly compares to an elegant skiff.
The vague disquietude which prevailed among the spectators had so much affected one of the crowd that he did not await the arrival of the vessel in harbor, but jumping into a small skiff, desired to be pulled alongside the Pharaon, which he reached as she rounded into La Reserve basin.
In case I am killed, the captain's name is Roger and the skiff is called the Lightning.
He was in a light skiff, and being well acquainted with the currents and eddies, had shifted his station, according to the shifting of the tide, from the Hen and Chickens to the Hog's Back, from the Hog's Back to the Pot, and from the Pot to the Frying Pan; but in the eagerness of his sport he did not see that the tide was rapidly ebbing, until the roaring of the whirlpools and eddies warned him of his danger, and he had some difficulty in shooting his skiff from among the rocks and breakers, and getting to the point of Blackwell's Island.
The young man threw himself into a light skiff, and, seizing the oars, he sent it across the lake toward the hut of Leather-Stocking, with a pair of vigorous arms.
I beg you, madam, to let her go," said Winterbourne ardently; for he had never yet enjoyed the sensation of guiding through the summer starlight a skiff freighted with a fresh and beautiful young girl.