skiff


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

skiff

 (skĭf)
n.
A flatbottom open boat of shallow draft, having a pointed bow and a square stern and propelled by oars, sail, or motor.

[Middle English skif, from Old French esquif, from Old Italian schifo, of Germanic origin.]

skiff

(skɪf)
n
(Nautical Terms) any of various small boats propelled by oars, sail, or motor
[C18: from French esquif, from Old Italian schifo a boat, of Germanic origin; related to Old High German schif ship]

skiff

(skɪf)

n.
any of various types of boats small enough for sailing or rowing by one person.
[1565–75; (< Middle French esquif) < Italian schifo < Langobardic; compare Old High German scif ship]
skiff′less, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.skiff - any of various small boats propelled by oars or by sails or by a motorskiff - any of various small boats propelled by oars or by sails or by a motor
sampan - an Asian skiff usually propelled by two oars
small boat - a boat that is small
Translations

skiff

[skɪf] Nesquife m

skiff

[ˈskɪf] n (= boat) → skiff m

skiff

nSkiff nt; (Sport) → Einer m

skiff

[skɪf] n (boat) → skiff m inv
References in classic literature ?
In his slow and pondering way, Skiff Miller looked at him, then asked, with a nod of his head toward Madge:
When I was fourteen, my head filled with the tales of the old voyagers, my vision with tropic isles and far sea-rims, I was sailing a small centreboard skiff around San Francisco Bay and on the Oakland Estuary.
Concealing the child beneath the other articles of clothing he pushed off from the bank, and, rowing close to the shore, hastened down the Thames toward the old dock where, the previous night, he had concealed his skiff.
He crept down the bank, watching with all his eyes, slipped into the water, swam three or four strokes and climbed into the skiff that did "yawl" duty at the boat's stern.
I had covered some hundred yards from shore when it became evident that my pursuer must grasp the stern of the skiff within the next half-dozen strokes.
A mile below the village the black boy dipped his paddle into the water and forced his skiff toward the bank.
The remonstrance came too late; the canoe was already far from the skiff, and the two hunters were too much engaged in the pursuit to listen to his voice.
He was in a light skiff, and being well acquainted with the currents and eddies, had shifted his station, according to the shifting of the tide, from the Hen and Chickens to the Hog's Back, from the Hog's Back to the Pot, and from the Pot to the Frying Pan; but in the eagerness of his sport he did not see that the tide was rapidly ebbing, until the roaring of the whirlpools and eddies warned him of his danger, and he had some difficulty in shooting his skiff from among the rocks and breakers, and getting to the point of Blackwell's Island.
The vague disquietude which prevailed among the spectators had so much affected one of the crowd that he did not await the arrival of the vessel in harbor, but jumping into a small skiff, desired to be pulled alongside the Pharaon, which he reached as she rounded into La Reserve basin.
A grinning small boy, in a small, bright-painted and half-decked skiff, sailed close in to the wall and let go his sheet to spill the wind.
One glance, however, was sufficient; and it was only one glance that I durst take from that unsteady skiff.
So he watched out for me one day in the spring, and catched me, and took me up the river about three mile in a skiff, and crossed over to the Illinois shore where it was woody and there warn't no houses but an old log hut in a place where the timber was so thick you couldn't find it if you didn't know where it was.