skim


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skim

 (skĭm)
v. skimmed, skim·ming, skims
v.tr.
1.
a. To remove floating matter from (a liquid).
b. To remove (floating matter) from a liquid.
2.
a. To embezzle (money) by taking a small portion on each transaction: corrupt governments skimming money from foreign aid.
b. To fail to declare part of (certain income, such as winnings) to avoid tax payment.
c. To copy information from (a credit card) as part of a skimming fraud.
3. To coat or cover with a thin layer: "the still, shallow water solidly frozen and skimmed with white" (Barbara Hurd).
4.
a. To throw so as to bounce or slide: skimming stones on the pond.
b. To glide or pass quickly and lightly over or along (a surface). See Synonyms at brush1.
5.
a. To read or glance through (a book, for example) quickly or superficially.
b. To glance over quickly; scan: skimmed the crowd for a familiar face.
c. To touch lightly or superficially on: a survey course that barely skimmed the surface of Latin American history.
v.intr.
1. To move or pass swiftly and lightly over or near a surface; glide.
2. To fail to declare certain income to avoid tax payment.
3. To give a quick and superficial reading, scrutiny, or consideration; glance: skimmed through the newspaper.
4. To become coated with a thin layer.
n.
1. The act of skimming.
2. Something that has been skimmed.
3. A thin layer or film: a skim of ice on the pond.
4. The money stolen by skimming from an account or business operation.

[Middle English skimmen, perhaps from Old French escumer, to remove scum, from escume, scum, of Germanic origin; see (s)keu- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

skim

(skɪm)
vb, skims, skimming or skimmed
1. (tr) to remove floating material from the surface of (a liquid), as with a spoon: to skim milk.
2. to glide smoothly or lightly over (a surface)
3. (tr) to throw (something) in a path over a surface, so as to bounce or ricochet: to skim stones over water.
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (when: intr, usually foll by through) to read (a book) in a superficial or cursory manner
5. to cover (a liquid) with a thin layer or (of liquid) to become coated in this way, as with ice, scum, etc
n
6. the act or process of skimming
7. (Cookery) material skimmed off a liquid, esp off milk
8. the liquid left after skimming
9. any thin layer covering a surface
[C15 skimmen, probably from scumen to skim; see scum]

skim

(skɪm)

v. skimmed, skim•ming,
n. v.t.
1. to take up or remove (floating matter) from the surface of a liquid, as with a spoon or ladle.
2. to clear (liquid) thus: to skim milk.
3. to move or glide lightly over or along (a surface, as of water).
4. to throw in a smooth, gliding path over or near a surface, or so as to bounce or ricochet along a surface: skimmed a stone across the lake.
5. to read, study, consider, treat, etc., in a superficial or cursory manner.
6. to cover with a thin film or layer: Ice skimmed the lake at night.
7. to take the best or most available parts or items from: bargain hunters skimming the flea markets at sunrise.
8. to take (the best parts or items) from something.
9. to conceal a portion of (winnings, earnings, etc.) in order to avoid paying taxes, fees, or the like on the full amount (sometimes fol. by off).
v.i.
10. to pass or glide lightly over or near a surface.
11. to read, study, consider, etc., something in a superficial or cursory way.
12. to become covered with a thin film or layer.
13. to conceal some part of income or profits; practice skimming.
n.
14. an act or instance of skimming.
15. something that is skimmed off.
16. a thin layer or film formed on the surface of something, esp. a liquid.
17. the amount taken or concealed by skimming.
[1375–1425; Middle English skymen, skemen < Old French escumer, derivative of escume impurities, scum < Vulgar Latin *scūma « West Germanic; see scum]

skim


Past participle: skimmed
Gerund: skimming

Imperative
skim
skim
Present
I skim
you skim
he/she/it skims
we skim
you skim
they skim
Preterite
I skimmed
you skimmed
he/she/it skimmed
we skimmed
you skimmed
they skimmed
Present Continuous
I am skimming
you are skimming
he/she/it is skimming
we are skimming
you are skimming
they are skimming
Present Perfect
I have skimmed
you have skimmed
he/she/it has skimmed
we have skimmed
you have skimmed
they have skimmed
Past Continuous
I was skimming
you were skimming
he/she/it was skimming
we were skimming
you were skimming
they were skimming
Past Perfect
I had skimmed
you had skimmed
he/she/it had skimmed
we had skimmed
you had skimmed
they had skimmed
Future
I will skim
you will skim
he/she/it will skim
we will skim
you will skim
they will skim
Future Perfect
I will have skimmed
you will have skimmed
he/she/it will have skimmed
we will have skimmed
you will have skimmed
they will have skimmed
Future Continuous
I will be skimming
you will be skimming
he/she/it will be skimming
we will be skimming
you will be skimming
they will be skimming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been skimming
you have been skimming
he/she/it has been skimming
we have been skimming
you have been skimming
they have been skimming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been skimming
you will have been skimming
he/she/it will have been skimming
we will have been skimming
you will have been skimming
they will have been skimming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been skimming
you had been skimming
he/she/it had been skimming
we had been skimming
you had been skimming
they had been skimming
Conditional
I would skim
you would skim
he/she/it would skim
we would skim
you would skim
they would skim
Past Conditional
I would have skimmed
you would have skimmed
he/she/it would have skimmed
we would have skimmed
you would have skimmed
they would have skimmed

skim


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To remove fat or scum from the surface of a liquid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.skim - a thin layer covering the surface of a liquidskim - a thin layer covering the surface of a liquid; "there was a thin skim of oil on the water"
covering, natural covering, cover - a natural object that covers or envelops; "under a covering of dust"; "the fox was flushed from its cover"
2.skim - reading or glancing through quickly
reading - the cognitive process of understanding a written linguistic message; "his main reading was detective stories"; "suggestions for further reading"
Verb1.skim - travel on the surface of water
glide - move smoothly and effortlessly
aquaplane - ride on an aquaplane
aquaplane - rise up onto a thin film of water between the tires and road so that there is no more contact with the road; "the car aquaplaned"
2.skim - move or pass swiftly and lightly over the surface of
touch - make physical contact with, come in contact with; "Touch the stone for good luck"; "She never touched her husband"
3.skim - examine hastily; "She scanned the newspaper headlines while waiting for the taxi"
examine, see - observe, check out, and look over carefully or inspect; "The customs agent examined the baggage"; "I must see your passport before you can enter the country"
4.skim - cause to skip over a surface; "Skip a stone across the pond"
throw - propel through the air; "throw a frisbee"
5.skim - coat (a liquid) with a layer
coat, surface - put a coat on; cover the surface of; furnish with a surface; "coat the cake with chocolate"
6.skim - remove from the surfaceskim - remove from the surface; "skim cream from the surface of milk"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
cream off, skim off - pick the best
7.skim - read superficially
read - interpret something that is written or printed; "read the advertisement"; "Have you read Salman Rushdie?"
Adj.1.skim - used of milk and milk products from which the cream has been removed; "yogurt made with skim milk"; "she can drink skimmed milk but should avoid butter"
fat-free, fatless, nonfat - without fat or fat solids; "nonfat or fat-free milk"

skim

verb
1. remove, separate, cream, take off, spoon off, ladle off Skim off the fat.
2. glide, fly, coast, plane, sail, float, brush, dart, scud seagulls skimming over the waves
3. (usually with over or through) scan, glance, run your eye over, thumb or leaf through I only had time to skim over the script before I came here.
skim something off embezzle, steal, misappropriate, trouser (slang), defraud, knock off (slang), spirit away If I read this right, he skimmed off about thirty million.

skim

verb
1. To strike a surface at such an angle as to be deflected:
2. To make light and momentary contact with, as in passing:
3. To pass quickly and lightly through the air:
4. To look through reading matter casually:
browse, dip into, flip through, glance at (or over) (or through), leaf (through), riffle (through), run through, scan, thumb (through).
noun
Light and momentary contact with another person or thing:
Translations
يَتَصَفَّح، يَقْرأ بِسُرْعَهيَقْشُديَمُر مُرورا سَطْحِيّا
listovatsbíratklouzat
skimmeskumme
kimmotakuoria
felületesen átfutsúrol
fleyta ofan afhlaupa yfirrenna yfir
nugriebtas pienasnugriebtiperbėgti akimisperversti
izšķirstītnokrejotnoņemtnosmeltpārslīdēt acīm
răsfoi
ögna igenomskumma
çabucak gözden geçirmeksekmeksıyırıp almaküzerinden kaymak

skim

[skɪm]
A. VT
1. [+ milk] → desnatar, descremar; [+ soup, liquid] → espumar
to skim the cream off the milkquitar la nata a la leche, desnatar la leche
skimmed milkleche f descremada or desnatada
2. (= graze) [+ surface] → rozar
to skim the ground [plane, bird etc] → volar a ras de la tierra
3. [+ stone] → hacer cabrillas con, hacer el salto de la rana con
4. (fig) [+ subject] → tratar superficialmente
B. VI to skim across/along the groundpasar rozando la tierra
to skim through a book (fig) → echar una ojeada or hojear a un libro
skim off VT + ADV [+ cream, grease] → desnatar
they skimmed off the brightest pupilssepararon a la flor y nata de los alumnos

skim

[ˈskɪm]
vt
[+ milk] → écrémer; [+ soup] → écumer
(= glide over) → raser, effleurer
(= read quickly) [+ notes, letter, article] → parcourir
skim across
vt fus (= glide over) → glisser sur
skim through
vt fus (= read quickly) → parcourirskimmed milk nlait m écrémé

skim

vt
(= remove floating matter)abschöpfen; milkentrahmen; (fig) profitsabsahnen (inf)
(= pass low over)streifen or streichen über (+acc); (fig: = touch on) → berühren; he skimmed stones across the waterer ließ Steine übers Wasser hüpfen or springen; he skimmed his hat across the roomer schleuderte seinen Hut quer durchs Zimmer; the book merely skims the surface of the problemdas Buch berührt das Problem nur an der Oberfläche
(= read quickly)überfliegen
vi (→ über +acc) (= move quickly)fliegen; (aircraft also)rasch gleiten; (stones)springen, hüpfen

skim

[skɪm]
1. vt
a. (soup) → schiumare; (milk) → scremare
to skim the fat off the soup → schiumare il brodo
to skim the cream off the milk → scremare il latte
b. (stone) → far rimbalzare; (subj, bird, plane) to skim the water/groundsfiorare or rasentare l'acqua/il suolo
2. vi to skim across or alongsfiorare
the stone skimmed across the ice → il sasso rimbalzò sul ghiaccio
to skim through a book (fig) → scorrere or dare una scorsa a un libro

skim

(skim) past tense, past participle skimmed verb
1. to remove (floating matter, eg cream) from the surface of (a liquid). Skim the fat off the gravy.
2. to move lightly and quickly over (a surface). The skier skimmed across the snow.
3. to read (something) quickly, missing out parts. She skimmed (through) the book.
skim milk, skimmed milk
milk from which the cream has been skimmed.
References in classic literature ?
Amy's face was a study when she saw her sister skim into the next drawing room, kiss all the young ladies with effusion, beam graciously upon the young gentlemen, and join in the chat with a spirit which amazed the beholder.
Anybody who could invent a new imitation had been sure of a fortune from old Durham, said Jurgis' informant; but it was hard to think of anything new in a place where so many sharp wits had been at work for so long; where men welcomed tuberculosis in the cattle they were feeding, because it made them fatten more quickly; and where they bought up all the old rancid butter left over in the grocery stores of a continent, and "oxidized" it by a forced-air process, to take away the odor, rechurned it with skim milk, and sold it in bricks in the cities
On the 17th of February, 1835, he sold the old carriage and bought a cheap second-hand buggy--said a buggy was just the trick to skim along mushy, slushy early spring roads with, and he had always wanted to try a buggy on those mountain roads, anyway.
I felt the words of my lessons slipping off, not one by one, or line by line, but by the entire page; I tried to lay hold of them; but they seemed, if I may so express it, to have put skates on, and to skim away from me with a smoothness there was no checking.
The first to captivate and take his fancy were the pots, out of which he would have very gladly helped himself to a moderate pipkinful; then the wine skins secured his affections; and lastly, the produce of the frying-pans, if, indeed, such imposing cauldrons may be called frying-pans; and unable to control himself or bear it any longer, he approached one of the busy cooks and civilly but hungrily begged permission to soak a scrap of bread in one of the pots; to which the cook made answer, "Brother, this is not a day on which hunger is to have any sway, thanks to the rich Camacho; get down and look about for a ladle and skim off a hen or two, and much good may they do you.
SHE's the one that knows her own mind," said Pinky, brother to Skim Winsh, and a Napoleon among carters who had helped to bring the grand piano across the fields in the autumn rains.
Even as they looked, the sea began to skim over between the floating cakes of ice, so intense was the cold; but on the horizon there was a vast red glare, and that was the light of the sunken sun.
They don't exhaust the subject, no doubt," he admitted; "but we don't touch it, don't even skim it.
As he did so we saw, at the distance of a mile or so, something which appeared to be a huge gray bird flap slowly up from the ground and skim smoothly off, flying very low and straight, until it was lost among the tree-ferns.
In these early days of her residence here Tess did not skim, but went out of doors at once after rising, where he was generally awaiting her.
Snagsby standing at his shop-door looking up at the clouds sees a crow who is out late skim westward over the slice of sky belonging to Cook's Court.
I know of no more delightful sensation than that of riding in one of these luxuriously appointed cars which skim, light and airy as feathers, along the soft, mossy avenues of Marentina.