skip town


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.skip town - disappear without notifying anyone (idiom)
disappear, vanish, go away - get lost, as without warning or explanation; "He disappeared without a trace"
References in periodicals archive ?
After leaving the cafe and an unconscious Sharon behind, she will quickly begin to pack some suitcases and prepare to skip town.
Thomas has plans to skip town instead, but when Mallory jumps in his car, the night and his future become a lot less certain.
The book Jitterbug Perfume by Tom Robbins, which tells of the "iron and fuzz" required to steer one's own destiny, was the catalyst that eventually encouraged her to skip town.
So will they skip town with the secret like everyone else seems to have done, or head to the police station and come clean about all the details?
May 15, 1969: It's Bloody Thursday at People's Park in Berkeley, California, and street theater activist Gus Bessemer returns from his confrontation with the "pigs" with a butt full of birdshot and the need to skip town for a construction job a thousand miles away.
It was quite a change from the tone of the remarks he made before last year's vacation to Hawaii, when he told reporters he was "eager to skip town.
Lord Keynes said in the long run we are dead, he forgot to mention that in the short run we get a margin call and must then skip town.
Those of us who haven't since vanished in a puff of credit card debt must remember those days, when many companies had a sweepstake on which member of staff would next have to skip town leaving a trail of debt carnage in their wake, while taking endless calls from banks begging customers to borrow more money.
NEW SERIES New York Mobster Frank (The Sopranos' Steven Van Zandt, above) has to skip town after angering his new boss.
But as we catch up with her this week, it seems more likely that she's going to skip town with - you guessed it - David Wicks.
When temperatures rise in New York City, apartment buyers skip town -- or so goes the conventional wisdom.