skittish


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Related to skittish: shore up

skit·tish

 (skĭt′ĭsh)
adj.
1. Moving quickly and lightly; lively.
2. Restlessly active or nervous; restive.
3. Undependably variable; mercurial or fickle.
4. Shy; bashful.

[Middle English, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skjōta, to shoot; see shoot.]

skit′tish·ly adv.
skit′tish·ness n.

skittish

(ˈskɪtɪʃ)
adj
1. playful, lively, or frivolous
2. difficult to handle or predict
3. rare coy
[C15: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse skjōta to shoot; see -ish]
ˈskittishly adv
ˈskittishness n

skit•tish

(ˈskɪt ɪʃ)

adj.
1. apt to start or shy: a skittish horse.
2. restlessly or excessively lively: a skittish mood.
3. fickle; uncertain.
4. shy; coy.
[1400–50; late Middle English, perhaps derivative of the Scandinavian source of Scots skite (see skitter); see -ish1]
skit′tish•ly, adv.
skit′tish•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.skittish - unpredictably excitable (especially of horses)
excitable - easily excited

skittish

adjective
1. nervous, lively, excitable, jumpy, restive, fidgety, highly strung, antsy (informal) The declining dollar gave heart to skittish investors.
nervous relaxed, calm, steady, composed, laid-back, placid, unfazed (informal), unflappable, unruffled, unexcitable
2. offbeat, bizarre, weird, way-out (informal), eccentric, novel, strange, unusual, rum (Brit. slang), uncommon, Bohemian, unconventional, far-out (slang), idiosyncratic, kinky (informal), off-the-wall (slang), unorthodox, oddball (informal), left-field (informal), freaky (slang), wacko (slang), outré, out there (slang) a fertile talent at war with a skittish sense of humour

skittish

adjective
Feeling or exhibiting nervous tension:
Slang: uptight.
Idioms: a bundle of nerves, all wound up, on edge.
Translations

skittish

[ˈskɪtɪʃ] ADJ (= capricious) → caprichoso, delicado; (= nervous) [horse etc] → nervioso, asustadizo; (= playful) → juguetón

skittish

[ˈskɪtɪʃ] adj
(= nervous) [person] → nerveux/euse; [animal] → nerveux/euse
The declining dollar gave heart to skittish investors → La baisse du dollar a redonné du cœur à des investisseurs nerveux.
(= frivolous) → frivole

skittish

adj (= playful)übermütig, schelmisch; (= flirtatious) womanneckisch, kokett; (= nervous) horse, investorunruhig

skittish

[ˈskɪtɪʃ] adj (horse, person) → ombroso/a
References in classic literature ?
Spirited horses, when not enough exercised, are often called skittish, when it is only play; and some grooms will punish them, but our John did not; he knew it was only high spirits.
he had cheerfully taken up his familiar business, and- like a well-fed but not overfat horse that feels himself in harness and grows skittish between the shafts- he dressed up in clothes as variegated and expensive as possible, and gaily and contentedly galloped along the roads of Poland, without himself knowing why or whither.
My maid is to be a model of discretion--an elderly woman, not a skittish young person who will only encourage me.
Haley's horse, which was a skittish young colt, winced, and bounced, and pulled hard at his halter.
I was going to the Grange one evening - a dark evening, threatening thunder - and, just at the turn of the Heights, I encountered a little boy with a sheep and two lambs before him; he was crying terribly; and I supposed the lambs were skittish, and would not be guided.
For everybody's family doctor was remarkably clever, and was understood to have immeasurable skill in the management and training of the most skittish or vicious diseases.
She wur always as skittish and full o' tricks as a--'
It is noticed, by the bye, that these damsels become, within the limits of decorum, more skittish when thus intrusted with the concrete representation of their sex, than when dividing the representation with Miss Twinkleton's young ladies.
She was big, blonde, skittish, and exuberant; she wore a dress like the sunset of a fine summer evening, and she effervesced with spacious good will to all men.
Here, the Podsnaps await the happy party; Mr Podsnap, with his hair-brushes made the most of; that imperial rocking-horse, Mrs Podsnap, majestically skittish.
Minora thought the incident typical of German manners, and not only made notes about it, but joined heartily in the health-drinking, and afterward grew skittish.
All of you on shore look to me just a lot of skittish youngsters that have never known a care in the world.