skulk


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skulk

 (skŭlk)
intr.v. skulked, skulk·ing, skulks
1. To lie in hiding, as out of cowardice or bad conscience; lurk.
2. To move about stealthily.
3. To evade work or obligation; shirk.
n.
A group of foxes.

[Middle English skulken, of Scandinavian origin.]

skulk′er n.

skulk

(skʌlk)
vb (intr)
1. to move stealthily so as to avoid notice
2. to lie in hiding; lurk
3. to shirk duty or evade responsibilities; malinger
n
4. a person who skulks
5. (Zoology) obsolete a pack of foxes or other animals that creep about stealthily
[C13: of Scandinavian origin; compare Norwegian skulka to lurk, Swedish skolka, Danish skulke to shirk]
ˈskulker n

skulk

(skʌlk)

v.i.
1. to lie or keep in hiding, as for some evil reason.
2. to move stealthily; slink.
3. Brit. to shirk duty; malinger.
n.
4. one that skulks.
5. a pack or group of foxes.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Scandinavian; compare Dan, Norwegian skulke, Swedish skolka play hooky]
skulk′er, n.
skulk′ing•ly, adv.
syn: See lurk.

Skulk

 a furtive group; a gathering of persons or animals given to skulking, 1883.
Examples: skulk of poisoned adders, 1582; of foxes, 1450; of friars, 1450; of heretics, 1532; of thieves, 1450.

skulk


Past participle: skulked
Gerund: skulking

Imperative
skulk
skulk
Present
I skulk
you skulk
he/she/it skulks
we skulk
you skulk
they skulk
Preterite
I skulked
you skulked
he/she/it skulked
we skulked
you skulked
they skulked
Present Continuous
I am skulking
you are skulking
he/she/it is skulking
we are skulking
you are skulking
they are skulking
Present Perfect
I have skulked
you have skulked
he/she/it has skulked
we have skulked
you have skulked
they have skulked
Past Continuous
I was skulking
you were skulking
he/she/it was skulking
we were skulking
you were skulking
they were skulking
Past Perfect
I had skulked
you had skulked
he/she/it had skulked
we had skulked
you had skulked
they had skulked
Future
I will skulk
you will skulk
he/she/it will skulk
we will skulk
you will skulk
they will skulk
Future Perfect
I will have skulked
you will have skulked
he/she/it will have skulked
we will have skulked
you will have skulked
they will have skulked
Future Continuous
I will be skulking
you will be skulking
he/she/it will be skulking
we will be skulking
you will be skulking
they will be skulking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been skulking
you have been skulking
he/she/it has been skulking
we have been skulking
you have been skulking
they have been skulking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been skulking
you will have been skulking
he/she/it will have been skulking
we will have been skulking
you will have been skulking
they will have been skulking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been skulking
you had been skulking
he/she/it had been skulking
we had been skulking
you had been skulking
they had been skulking
Conditional
I would skulk
you would skulk
he/she/it would skulk
we would skulk
you would skulk
they would skulk
Past Conditional
I would have skulked
you would have skulked
he/she/it would have skulked
we would have skulked
you would have skulked
they would have skulked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.skulk - lie in wait, lie in ambush, behave in a sneaky and secretive manner
conceal, hide - prevent from being seen or discovered; "Muslim women hide their faces"; "hide the money"
2.skulk - avoid responsibilities and duties, e.g., by pretending to be illskulk - avoid responsibilities and duties, e.g., by pretending to be ill
fiddle, shirk, shrink from, goldbrick - avoid (one's assigned duties); "The derelict soldier shirked his duties"
3.skulk - move stealthily; "The lonely man skulks down the main street all day"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"

skulk

verb
1. creep, sneak, slink, pad, slope, prowl, sidle He skulked off.
2. lurk, hide, lie in wait, loiter skulking in the safety of the car

skulk

verb
To move silently and furtively:
Slang: gumshoe.
Translations
يَتَوارى عن الأنْظار
skrývat se
luske rundt
leynast, læîupokast
lindėti
slēptiesuzglūnētzagties
skrývať sa
gizlenmekpusuda beklemek

skulk

[skʌlk] VIesconderse
to skulk aboutesconderse

skulk

[ˈskʌlk] vise cacher
to skulk off → s'en aller en douce

skulk

vi (= move)schleichen, sich stehlen; (= lurk)sich herumdrücken

skulk

[skʌlk] vi (also skulk about) → aggirarsi furtivamente
to skulk into/out of → entrare/uscire furtivamente

skulk

(skalk) verb
to wait about or keep oneself hidden (often for a bad purpose). Someone was skulking in the bushes.
References in classic literature ?
We know this well, we who have passed into the Realm of Terror, who skulk in eternal dusk among the scenes of our former lives, invisible even to ourselves and one another, yet hiding forlorn in lonely places; yearning for speech with our loved ones, yet dumb, and as fearful of them as they of us.
Nae doubt it's a hard thing to skulk and starve in the Heather, but it's harder yet to lie shackled in a red-coat prison.
Charley, do nothing but skulk about, till you bring home some news of him
When on a war party, however, they go on foot, to enable them to skulk through the country with greater secrecy; to keep in thickets and ravines, and use more adroit subterfuges and stratagems.
He skulks about the wharves of Joppa, and seeks a ship that's bound for Tarshish.
He summons the rest of his skulk (gang) and they emerge from hidden tunnels.
But you have got to have that toughness to stay there and not to skulk off.
They skulk and scuttle around our living room every night and in the morning we find leftover bits of flies, beetles and other bugs the giant spider's been gorging on.
In other words, it remains to be explained why a motion verb like walk can participate in the resultative construction (example 2 below), while this is not the case with a different motion verb like skulk (example 3).
Would we like to see Rick Santorum skulk out of the U.
They skulk into the surgery to accept the drugs they protest against.
Perhaps I am the exception; perhaps all others who partake of these games are bloody, slavering things who, after an hour of joystick stimulus, go and skulk about in dark alleys, waiting to cudgel unsuspecting passers-by.