slacks


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Related to slacks: khakis

slack 1

 (slăk)
adj. slack·er, slack·est
1. Not tense or taut; loose: a slack rope; slack muscles. See Synonyms at loose.
2.
a. Lacking in activity; not busy: a slack season for the travel business.
b. Moving slowly; sluggish: a slack pace.
3. Lacking in diligence or due care or concern; negligent: a slack worker. See Synonyms at negligent.
4. Flowing or blowing with little speed: a slack current; slack winds.
5. Linguistics Pronounced with the muscles of the tongue and jaw relatively relaxed; lax.
v. slacked, slack·ing, slacks
v.tr.
1.
a. To make looser or less taut: slacked the sail.
b. To make slower: slacked our pace.
2. To be careless or remiss in doing: slack one's duty.
3. To slake (lime).
v.intr.
1. To be or become slack.
2. To be inactive or avoid work: slacked around the house all day.
n.
1. A loose part, as of a rope or sail: hauled in the slack.
2. A period of little activity; a lull: a slack in business.
3.
a. A cessation of movement in a current of air or water.
b. An area of still water.
4. Unused capacity: still some slack in the economy.
5. slacks Casual pants that are not part of a suit.
adv.
In a slack manner: a banner hanging slack.
Phrasal Verb:
slack off
1. To decrease in activity or intensity.
2. To work less intensely than is required or expected: slacked off at work and started surfing the internet.
Idiom:
cut/give (someone) some slack
Slang To make an allowance for (someone), as in allowing more time to finish something.

[Middle English slak, from Old English slæc; see slēg- in Indo-European roots.]

slack′ly adv.
slack′ness n.

slack 2

 (slăk)
n.
A mixture of coal fragments, coal dust, and dirt that remains after screening coal.

[Middle English sleck.]

slack 3

 (slăk)
n. Chiefly British
1. A small dell or hollow.
2. A bog; a morass.

[Middle English slak, from Old Norse slakki.]

slacks

(slæks)
pl n
(Clothing & Fashion) informal trousers worn by both sexes

slacks

(slæks)

n. (used with a pl. v.)
trousers for informal or casual wear.
[1815–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.slacks - (usually in the plural) pants for casual wearslacks - (usually in the plural) pants for casual wear
trouser, pant - (usually in the plural) a garment extending from the waist to the knee or ankle, covering each leg separately; "he had a sharp crease in his trousers"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations
ألْبِسَه فَضْفاضَه مُتَراخِيَه
kalhoty
slacks
falzarpantalon
hosszúnadrág
buxur
bol tip pantolon

slacks

[slæks] NPLpantalones mpl

slacks

[ˈslæks] npl (old-fashioned) (= trousers) → pantalon m

slacks

plHose f

slacks

[slæks] nplpantaloni mpl casual inv

slack

(slӕk) adjective
1. loose; not firmly stretched. Leave the rope slack.
2. not firmly in position. He tightened a few slack screws.
3. not strict; careless. He is very slack about getting things done.
4. in industry etc, not busy; inactive. Business has been rather slack lately.
ˈslacken verb
(sometimes with off or up).
1. to make or become looser. She felt his grip on her arm slacken.
2. to make or become less busy, less active or less fast. The doctor told him to slacken up if he wanted to avoid a heart-attack.
ˈslackly adverb
ˈslackness noun
slacks noun plural
trousers, usually loose-fitting, worn informally by men or women. a pair of slacks.
References in classic literature ?
As for Clarence, how easy it would be to haul up one's slacks to practically an unlimited extent on the subject of his emotions at this time.
Work being slack at present at Devil's Ford, I reck'ned I'd take a pasear down to 'Frisco, and dip into the vortex o' fash'nable society and out again.
It was the holiday rush that was over, the girls said in answer to Marija's inquiries; after that there was always a slack.
Her clack was going all day, and you would think something would surely happen to her works, by and by; but no, they never got out of order; and she never had to slack up for words.
Well, when the dark shut down, in the rugged hills, that poor little chap had been tearing around in the saddle all day, and I noticed by the slack knee-pressure that she was tired and tottery, and I got dreadfully afraid; but every time I tried to slow down and let her go to sleep, so I could stop, she hurried me up again; and so, sure enough, at last over she went!
The connections of the several sections of the raft are slack and pliant, so that the raft may be readily bent into any sort of curve required by the shape of the river.
So, with the cunning of a madman, I backed into the far corner of my cell when next I heard him approaching and gathering a little slack of the great chain which held me in my hand I waited his coming, crouching like some beast of prey.
I call to mind a winter landscape in Amsterdam - a flat foreground of waste land, with here and there stacks of timber, like the huts of a camp of some very miserable tribe; the long stretch of the Handelskade; cold, stone-faced quays, with the snow-sprinkled ground and the hard, frozen water of the canal, in which were set ships one behind another with their frosty mooring-ropes hanging slack and their decks idle and deserted, because, as the master stevedore (a gentle, pale person, with a few golden hairs on his chin and a reddened nose) informed me, their cargoes were frozen-in up-country on barges and schuyts.
It was attached to a stout cross-timber above his head and the slack fell to the level of his knees.
He was one of those boys who are too slack to play games, and he exercised great ingenuity in making excuses to avoid such as were compulsory.
Denisov was angry with the Cossack because the saddle girths were too slack, reproved him, and mounted.
Discovering that his martingale had more slack in it than usual, he proceeded to give an exhibition of rearing and hind-leg walking.