slangy


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slang

 (slăng)
n.
1. A kind of language occurring chiefly in casual and playful speech, made up typically of coinages and figures of speech that are deliberately used in place of standard terms for added raciness, humor, irreverence, or other effect.
2. Language peculiar to a group; argot or jargon: thieves' slang.
v. slanged, slang·ing, slangs
v.intr.
1. To use slang.
2. To use angry and abusive language: persuaded the parties to quit slanging and come to the bargaining table.
v.tr.
To attack with abusive language; vituperate: "They slanged each other with every foul name they had learned from the age of three" (Virginia Henley).

[Origin unknown.]

slang′i·ly adv.
slang′i·ness n.
slang′y adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.slangy - constituting or expressed in slang or given to the use of slang; "a slangy expression"; "slangy speech"
informal - used of spoken and written language
Translations

slangy

[ˈslæŋɪ] ADJ (slangier (compar) (slangiest (superl))) [person] → que usa mucho argot, que usa mucha jerga; [style etc] → argótico, jergal

slangy

[ˈslæŋi] adjargotique

slangy

adj (+er), slangily
advsalopp

slangy

[ˈslæŋɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (fam) → gergale
References in classic literature ?
They take with them a quantity of food, and when the commissary department fails they "skirmish," as Jack terms it in his sinful, slangy way.
And that night, coming out of the cannery, he was interviewed by his fellow workmen, who were very angry and incoherently slangy.
And there's nothing rude or slangy in what she does say.
Mr Pickering did not put it so to himself, for he was rarely slangy even in thought, but what he felt was that he had caught The Man and his confederate with the goods.
That, of course, also appears to be the chief influence on Mezzrow, whose slangy hipster prose at times sounds like Kerouac's--or vice versa.
26) Rhyme without meter will hardly suffice, not because it is formless, but because it provides so erratic a formal principle as to seem always sloppy, slangy, or cute.
Apparently a great many people did, because it was later that the slangy term "you guys'' began to be used, not only for mixed groups, but for groups that were entirely female.
The author also provides translations for very difficult, slangy passages but is not consistent in his translations--an omission that he explains but is really unsatisfactory.
Now, this question arises that what gender use the slangy and which one uses the formal or standard style?
That breadth is certainly in evidence in the poems alamun wrote over a few weeks in 1976 and which were published in Slovenia (then Yugoslavia) in 1979 as On the Tracks of Wild Game, and translated here into lively, slangy English by Sonja Kravanja.
None of it really rings true; and the concept isn't much helped by Christine Jones's neon-dazzling but spatially bewildering sets or, even more, by the slangy Met Tides, which over and over break Verdi's carefully set moods.
The film is a dead-end London thriller, although it's not quite as glib as the slangy title would suggests (Cert 15, 2012) **