slavishly


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Related to slavishly: take on, errand, indicated

slav·ish

 (slā′vĭsh)
adj.
1. Of or characteristic of a slave or slavery; servile: Her slavish devotion to her job ruled her life.
2. Showing no originality; blindly imitative: a slavish copy of the original.

slav′ish·ly adv.
slav′ish·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.slavishly - in a slavish manner; "his followers slavishly believed in his new diet"
Translations

slavishly

[ˈsleɪvɪʃlɪ] ADVservilmente

slavishly

[ˈsleɪvɪʃli] adv [copy] → servilement

slavishly

[ˈsleɪvɪʃlɪ] adv (see adj) → servilmente, pedissequamente
References in classic literature ?
or who, sitting calmly under his own vine, is to pass a judgment on the doings of a poor, hunted dog, slavishly afraid, slavishly rebellious, like John Nicholson on that particular Sunday?
This they will follow slavishly whether in hotels, on promenades, at meetings, or when on a journey.
Sensible despots have never confined that precaution to women: they have taken their whips with them when they have dealt with men, and been slavishly idealized by the men over whom they have flourished the whip much more than by women.
But looking at her carefully she came to the conclusion that the hospital nurse was only slavishly acquiescent, and that the look of satisfaction was produced by no splendid conception of God within her.
It is a great pity that the ardent youth should not be permitted and even encouraged to say this to himself, instead of falling slavishly before a great author and accepting him at all points as infallible.
But in the last resort he simply ceased to believe in himself, and doggedly, slavishly sought arguments in all directions, fumbling for them, as though someone were forcing and drawing him to it.
The quintet negotiate Zappa's music with panache, not attempting to slavishly imitate Frank's sound, and when Black comes on, he adds even more authority to the performance.
Paul Burrell was slavishly (some might say foolishly) devoted to the Princess.
Like it or not, they are role models - what they do on the pitch is aped slavishly by thousands of youngsters across the nation.
a tendency to reiterate entire phrases, like "alias Pasithee," slavishly appended to occurrences of Claude's name [IX, XXVIII, LVI, and passim]) and incongruous uses of certain terms (e.
A talk-show host once slavishly noted that Bernhard had conquered so many different media that she could legitimately categorize herself "simply as performer.
In these and other areas, excellent descriptions expose the dangers of exaggeration when Balanchine's teaching is followed slavishly but not fully understood.